One Nation, Uninsured: Why the U.S. Has No National Health Insurance

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Overview

Every industrial nation in the world guarantees its citizens access to essential health care services—every country, that is, except the United States. In fact, one in eight Americans—a shocking 43 million people—do not have any health care insurance at all.
One Nation, Uninsured offers a vividly written history of America's failed efforts to address the health care needs of its citizens. Covering the entire twentieth century, Jill Quadagno shows how each attempt to enact national health insurance was met with fierce attacks by powerful stakeholders, who mobilized their considerable resources to keep the financing of health care out of the government's hands. Quadagno describes how at first physicians led the anti-reform coalition, fearful that government entry would mean government control of the lucrative private health care market. Doctors lobbied legislators, influenced elections by giving large campaign contributions to sympathetic candidates, and organized "grassroots" protests, conspiring with other like-minded groups to defeat reform efforts. As the success of Medicare and Medicaid in the mid-century led physicians and the AMA to start scaling back their attacks, the insurance industry began assuming a leading role against reform that continues to this day.
One Nation, Uninsured offers a sweeping history of the battles over health care. It is an invaluable read for anyone who has a stake in the future of America's health care system.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Briskly written...an excellent primer for anybody interested in picking up the reform banner today.... Fresh, engaging."—Jonathan Cohn, Washington Post Book World

"A strongly argued account that provides useful ammunition for anyone seeking to effect change in a medical system that willfully excludes so many who need it."—Kirkus Reviews

"An important book. Jill Quadagno provides an impressive array of historical evidence to advance original arguments for why the United States lacks a comprehensive health care system and why health insurance should be viewed as a social right. This book is must reading for those concerned about health care reform in the United States."—William Julius Wilson, author of When Work Disappears

"Readable and engaging.... Some of the most interesting portions come from Quadagno's own archival searches and her interviews with people who lived the history that she describes.... Quadagno's sustained focus on interest-group politics seems right on target."—New England Journal of Medicine

"The most comprehensive and up-to-date account of the power and effectiveness of interest groups in defeating a century of national health insurance reform campaigns. An impressive combination of theory and historical research...sets the parameters for the next round of debate."—Lawrence R. Jacobs, University of Minnesota

"A chilling historical account of how powerful groups with self-serving financial interests have successfully blocked attempts to enact national health insurance for seven decades.... Anyone eager to seek reform of our badly fragmented health care system must study its lessons and its blueprint for action; a task that will require nearly unprecedented political skills and monumental organizational prowess." —Jerome P. Kassirer, M.D., author of On The Take: How Medicine's Complicity With Big Business Can Endanger Your Health

"Quadagno, a distinguished sociologist with a long-standing interest in policy, explores a century of government attempts to create universal health care and the powerful forces that have defeated those attempts.... Her sociological insights illuminate a path to reform."—Judy Goldstein Botello, The San Diego Union-Tribune

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195312034
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication date: 10/9/2006
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 933,452
  • Product dimensions: 9.20 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Jill Quadagno is the Mildred and Claude Pepper Eminent Scholar in Social Gerontology and Professor of Sociology at Florida State University. A past president of the American Sociological Association, she served as Senior Policy Advisor on the President's Bipartisan Commission on Entitlement and Tax Reform in 1994.

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Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction
1. Doctors' Politics and the Red Menace
2. Organized Labor's Health Benefits
3. Provider Sovereignty and Civil Rights
4. Don't Rock the Boat
5. Cost Containment versus National Health Insurance
6. The Revolt of the Corporate Purchaser
7. The Insurers Triumphant
8. Why the United States Has No National Health Insurance and What Can Be Done About It
Notes
Index

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 20, 2011

    Recommended

    One Nation Uninsured is an excellent book for anyone who wants to learn why the Unites States is the only industrialized nation in the world that is not able to provide health insurance for all of its citizens. In addition, this book is simple and easy to read because each of the explanations for why the United States does not have universal health care is split into one reason per chapter, with eight chapters overall.
    First of all, the format of the book allows Quadagno to provide evidence for her evidence while still giving a summary of the events of the time period she is examining, which lends itself well to appealing to those who are not familiar with the specific points in history that support the author's argument. However, while the majority of the book leads to a compelling argument, the introduction, which is mostly made up of anecdotes, does make a very compelling argument. While these stories do pull one's heartstrings, they do not make a significant contribution compared to evidence shown in the rest of the book.
    Secondly, while Quadagno makes an excellent argument for universal healthcare, and why the United States should implement universal healthcare, she does seem to center her argument on the fact that the current system is unfair, which it is, but the question to this is: So what? The Constitution has no prohibition against unfairness, just as it does not mandate fairness. Just because everyone is not treated fairly does not mean that everyone should be brought to a lower level.
    In short, A Nation Uninsured is a book that, despite some flaws in the author's argument and introduction, is very interesting to anyone who wants to find out why and how universal health care was shot down throughout the 20th century.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2005

    A wonderfully written account of why the US is the only nation without universal coverage

    Now I understand why I got turned down by one insurer after another even though I am only 28, just because of an abnormal pap smear. This great book explains why Americans don't have the right to health care. Love this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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