One of a Kind: with audio recording

One of a Kind: with audio recording

by Ariel S. Winter, David Hitch
     
 

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In this wry and witty picture book, an only child learns that in a classroom of multiples, individuality can be awesome.

All the kids in Lysander Singleton’s class are either twins or triplets, which means Lysander Singleton is the only “only child” at Twin Oaks Elementary. He tries to do what he can to fit in—making

Overview

In this wry and witty picture book, an only child learns that in a classroom of multiples, individuality can be awesome.

All the kids in Lysander Singleton’s class are either twins or triplets, which means Lysander Singleton is the only “only child” at Twin Oaks Elementary. He tries to do what he can to fit in—making photocopies of himself, or attempting to play games with the other kids—though his efforts are usually met with unfortunate results.
     But when it comes time for the schoolwide Twindividuation competition, a series of events meant to encourage individuality, Lysander quickly realizes that being the only “only child” does have its advantages—and that being unique isn’t such a bad thing after all.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The oft-seen theme of fitting in versus individuality is given an odd twist in this book about a boy who feels unimportant. “Lysander Singleton was the only only child at Twin Oaks Elementary. Everyone else was a twin.” While some of first-time author Winter’s tongue-in-cheek humor is clever, Lysander’s definition of being “important” is shallow (“The only classmates who would be his friends were also unpopular. This left Lysander feeling rather unimportant”), and the prim narration almost defies young readers to understand what’s being said (“The children met with mixed results, but Lysander, practiced at distrust and uncertainty, wasn’t falling for anything.” Hitch’s (Doctor Squash the Doll Doctor) rough-edged digital cartoons add welcome humor as the school’s Twindividuation contest, in which being an only child gives Lysander a chance to shine, allows him to achieve the attention he desires. After Lysander wins every single event, he receives “the individual award for individuality” and is accepted by his peers, but the story’s matter-of-fact prose mutes any real sense of triumph. Ages 4–7. Agent: Chelsea Lindman, the Nicholas Ellison Agency. Illustrator’s agent: Arena Illustration. (June)
School Library Journal
Gr 1–3—Appropriately named, Lysander Singleton is the "only only child" at his elementary school. As every other student is a twin, his challenges are unique, making it tough to play games or have friends. Brush-marked cartoon images with paint and graphic prints highlight the boy in his very formal school clothes as he duplicates his body parts on a copier and pieces them together to form his own twin. He feels unimportant and left out—it shows in his worried, down-turn expression, but his school's annual celebration called Twindividuation suddenly spotlights Lysander's strengths: as a member of both twin teams, his teammates find him to be independently strong and unhampered by dependence on others in his actions and choices. To his surprise, top scores and good sportsmanship win him both the admiration of his peers and self-confidence. Younger readers may relate to the narrative of Lysander's efforts to face his school's challenges, and they will certainly enrich their personal vocabulary list with his "uncertainty" as he "alternately" plays for each team, enters the "Isolated Ice Cream Inquiry," and displays his "self-assurance." With appealing art and praise for individual effort, this title is recommended as a general purchase for all libraries.—Mary Elam, Learning Media Services, Plano ISD, TX
Kirkus Reviews
For one lonesome boy, fitting in means standing out. Lysander Singleton is the only only child at Twin Oaks Elementary. He tries his best to connect with the built-in pairs of twin classmates at his school but often finds himself friendless and feeling unimportant. The bright, digital artwork, blending a '60s retro style with an Edwardian fashion aesthetic, highlights Lysander's ongoing frustration. His situation just may change when the school hosts its annual Twindividuation, a daylong series of events meant to encourage individuality. With twins divided into two separate teams and given mismatched uniforms, Lysander expects to be left out once again. But he aces the solo singing competition, the one-man relay and a wickedly spot-on twin dilemma, the Isolated Ice Cream Inquiry. In this last, he chooses an ice-cream flavor without the benefit of sibling consultation in a record-setting 15 seconds, finally gaining confidence and the recognition he deserves. Winning the Simondon-Stiegler Cup, the individual award for individuality, proves it. While not unique, this lighthearted story helps children appreciate their own special qualities and build the courage to express them. (Picture book. 4-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781442453081
Publisher:
Aladdin
Publication date:
06/05/2012
Sold by:
SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
Lexile:
AD850L (what's this?)
File size:
11 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Ariel S. Winter was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the Shamus Award, and the Macavity Award for his novel The Twenty-Year Death. He is also the author of the children’s picture book One of a Kind, illustrated by David Hitch, and the blog We Too Were Children, Mr. Barrie. He lives in Baltimore.

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