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One of the Problems of Everett Anderson
     

One of the Problems of Everett Anderson

by Lucille Clifton, Ann Grifalconi (Illustrator)
 

A sensitive exploration of a difficult problem by an award winning author/illustrator team.

"One day in school, just out of the blue,"

Everett whispers, "Greg started to cry,

and I went over to ask him why

and he looked up and sighed,

'I can't tell you.'

And he had the saddest, saddest face

like he was lost

Overview

A sensitive exploration of a difficult problem by an award winning author/illustrator team.

"One day in school, just out of the blue,"

Everett whispers, "Greg started to cry,

and I went over to ask him why

and he looked up and sighed,

'I can't tell you.'

And he had the saddest, saddest face

like he was lost in the loneliest place."

Everett Anderson doesn't know what to do when his friend Greg comes to school with bruises, or when Greg cries and can't explain what's wrong. Should Everett tell the teacher, or would that only make things worse for Greg? Everett's sister thinks maybe it's none of their business, but he can't stop worrying about his friend. Then, when Everett Anderson tells his mother, he opens a window of possibility.

This tender story perfectly evokes the confusion, concern—and eventual hope—one little boy feels in the face of a very difficult problem.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
One of the Problems of Everett Anderson, the eighth by Lucille Clifton, illus. by Ann Grifalconi, gently and sensitively addresses the issue of child abuse. After Everett notices bruises and scars on his new friend, Greg, he doesn't know what to do. "I could tell the teacher," he says. "[But] I don't want to make it bad for Greg or for his mom and dad." Finally, Everett tells his mother, who helps Everett "to understand that one of the things he can do right now is listen to Greg and hug and hold his friend." Grifalconi's muted illustrations poignantly evoke the fear and uncertainty of the situation. An excellent choice for opening up a challenging conversation. (Sept.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children may be confused and upset when their friends experience physical abuse, but they often don't know what to do with their knowledge. In this story, a young boy suspects that his best friend is being hurt by his mother. He notices bruises and sees how sad his friend appears. When he finally tells his own mother about his concerns, she advises him to be supportive and to tell her if something else happens to his friend. The illustrations in this book are soft, warm chalk drawings that add a comforting visual texture to the story. Teachers and counselors might want to include this book in instructional units about personal safety. 2001, Henry Holt and Company, $16.95. Ages 5 to 8. Reviewer: S. Latson SOURCE: Parent Council, September 2001 (Vol. 9, No. 1)
Children's Literature
Everett worries about his friend Greg, who seems to have scars and bruises, and to cry without being able to tell why. Everett wonders whether it is any of his business, but finally tells his mother, hoping she can help, and that he can make a difference. This simple, rhyming story ends with Everett's caring concern, an informative reassurance for other worried and caring kids. Grifalconi reinforces the low-key moodiness of the text by filling ten double pages with softly toned pastel scenes which focus on the friends. The barest of solid-colored, ambiguous backgrounds emphasize the expressive faces and gestures, which tell more than the words. 2001, Henry Holt, $16.95. Ages 4 to 8. Reviewer:Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Everett's new friend Greg comes to school every day with fresh bruises and a sad, sad face, "like he was lost in the loneliest place." Everett wants desperately to help him but has no idea what he can do or say. When he shares his concern with his mother, she explains that sometimes just being there for his friend and listening to him are what he can do best. The text, written in rhyme, is enhanced by sensitive, full-page color illustrations that express the emotions dealt with, ranging from confusion, worry, and sadness to eventual hope. This is a gentle depiction of a troubled young victim of child abuse and his understanding friend. Useful as bibliotherapy and for opening class discussion about this topic.-Sally R. Dow, Ossining Public Library, NY Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780805052015
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
Publication date:
09/28/2001
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.48(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Lucille Clifton, poet, storyteller, college professor, mother of six and grandmother of four, is the author of many books for young readers. She has written eight books featuring the character Everett Anderson. Everett Anderson's Goodbye is a Coretta Scott King Award winner. Ms. Clifton lives in Maryland.

Ann Grifalconi has created more than 50 books for children. She is well known for her Caldecott Honor book, The Village of Round and Square Houses, as well as The Jazz Man, a Newbery Honor book written by her mother, Mary Weik. Ms. Grifalconi lives in New York.

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