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One or Two Things I Learned About Love
     

One or Two Things I Learned About Love

5.0 1
by Dyan Sheldon
 

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If this first love is true love, why can’t Hildy hang out with her friends without feeling guilty? Dyan Sheldon takes on the possessive side of summer romance with humor and insight.

Hildy has only had two-and-a-half dates in her whole life, and she isn’t counting the half. It’s starting to look as if she’s never going to have a third

Overview

If this first love is true love, why can’t Hildy hang out with her friends without feeling guilty? Dyan Sheldon takes on the possessive side of summer romance with humor and insight.

Hildy has only had two-and-a-half dates in her whole life, and she isn’t counting the half. It’s starting to look as if she’s never going to have a third date, or be kissed, or know a boy who is more than just a friend. Then, on an ordinary day, she meets Connor of the melt-that-ice-cap smile — and a summer that was going to be ordinary as toast turns into Hildy’s summer of love. But love for Hildy is a little more complicated than the songs and movies have led her to believe. It’s not so much girl-meets-boy-and loses-her-heart as boy-meets-girl-and-loses-his-mind. Part cautionary tale and part romantic comedy, Dyan Sheldon’s wry, diary-style novel weighs in on all ends of the relationship scale in a story of first love.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
01/27/2014
Hildy has always wanted a boyfriend, and at 17 she finally meets Connor. "Just being near him made me feel fizzy," she writes in her diary. The mellow middle daughter in a highly dramatic family, Hildy often feels overlooked, and Connor gives her the attention she craves. He texts and calls all the time, but he's also moody, passive-aggressive, and deeply jealous. Hildy's refusal to recognize the seeds of dysfunction in their relationship is often painful, yet Sheldon avoids demonizing Connor. Despite the differing degrees of concern that Hildy's friends express, she's head over heels and is forming her own opinions about love and relationships. Her thankless job at a farm stand, an oppressive summer heat wave, and an array of quirky friends contribute verisimilitude. Sheldon's (The Crazy Things Girls Do for Love) use of the diary form establishes a strong reader-writer bond, resulting in an amusing, empathetic, and intimate story. An honest exploration of the tumultuous emotions that can accompany early romances. Ages 12–up. Agent: Caroline Sheldon Literary Agency. (Dec.)
Children's Literature - Elisabeth Greenberg
Hildy D'Angelo, a middle daughter trapped between a cute college sister and a screaming demanding younger sis, has a whole crowd of good friends, but, my, she wants to fall in love! The summer is hot and sticky, she is working at the vegetable stand and taking pottery classes, and, face it, life is sort of boring for a girl who has had only two and one-half dates in her whole life. Her summer picks up when she meets Connor, good-looking, funny, smart, and looking at her. He is so sweet and so romantic, what's not to like? But as Hildy falls into his arms again and again and tastes those sensational kisses, she loses her own sense of self and her wide range of friends. Connor bounces between treating her like the queen of his heart and accusing her of flirting and cheating. He begins reading her email, changing her Facebook page, and even showing up at pottery class and her grandmother's to make sure she is where she says she is. And, he never stops texting. As the reader is imploring, "don't do it, Hildy," Hildy just keeps prancing down a lonely primrose path until, finally, Connor oversteps the bounds and breaks and enters her best friend's house. Even after Hildy realizes how possessive Connor is, she still goes back for one more round! She wants to believe in love! This cautionary tale defines one kind of "bad" love while introducing a lively group of friends with hilarious teenage lives. Reviewer: Elisabeth Greenberg
School Library Journal
02/01/2014
Gr 7 Up—Seventeen-year-old Hildy D'Angelo has never been kissed. In fact, she's only ever had two and a half dates and the way the summer has started, she's not sure that she'll see date number three. However, her luck changes when a trip to the mall with her friends ends with the cute barista asking for her number. Hildy's summer becomes a rush of kisses and romantic dates with the seemingly perfect Connor. The teen finds herself blowing off her friends and trying to justify her actions by telling herself (and her friends) that it's normal to want to spend all your time with your boyfriend. But then Connor starts acting jealous of any time Hildy spends without him and accuses her of flirting with other guys. As his behavior becomes more possessive and unpredictable, Hildy wonders if this is what love is really all about. Sheldon captures the giddiness of a first relationship. Hildy has no real experience with guys, so her willingness to accept Connor's excuses and explain away his behavior is not as far-fetched as some readers might feel. More experienced teens may find her completely clueless, but those who are still dreaming of their first kiss will be wrapped up this cautionary teen romance. A solid addition to most collections.—Heather Webb, Worthington Libraries, OH
From the Publisher
Sheldon captures the giddiness of a first relationship. ... [Teens] who are still dreaming of their first kiss will be wrapped up this cautionary teen romance.
—School Library Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763666651
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
12/10/2013
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
5.94(w) x 8.38(h) x 1.02(d)
Lexile:
HL710L (what's this?)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Dyan Sheldon is the author of many books for young people, including Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen, The Crazy Things Girls Do for Love, and My Worst Best Friend. About this latest novel, she says, "I think it takes all of us a while to figure out that the word love, like the word freedom, means different things to different people." American by birth, Dyan Sheldon lives in London.

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One or Two Things I Learned about Love 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
PHILLIP IS SO CUTE