One Perfect Day: The Selling of the American Wedding [NOOK Book]

Overview

Astutely observed and deftly witty, One Perfect Day masterfully mixes investigative journalism and social commentary to explore the workings of the wedding industry?an industry that claims to be worth $160 billion to the U.S. economy and which has every interest in ensuring that the American wedding becomes ever more lavish and complex. Taking us inside the workings of the wedding industry?including the swelling ranks of professional event planners, department stores with their online registries, the retailers ...
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One Perfect Day: The Selling of the American Wedding

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Overview

Astutely observed and deftly witty, One Perfect Day masterfully mixes investigative journalism and social commentary to explore the workings of the wedding industry?an industry that claims to be worth $160 billion to the U.S. economy and which has every interest in ensuring that the American wedding becomes ever more lavish and complex. Taking us inside the workings of the wedding industry?including the swelling ranks of professional event planners, department stores with their online registries, the retailers and manufacturers of bridal gowns, and the Walt Disney Company and its Fairy Tale Weddings program?New Yorker writer Rebecca Mead skillfully holds the mirror up to the bride's deepest hopes and fears about her wedding day, revealing that for better or worse, the way we marry is who we are.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
You could run a small country on what Americans spend each year on weddings. The statistics are staggering: The estimates run from $40 billion ($50 billion if you count honeymoons and gift registry) to $160 billion. One Perfect Day immerses you in the day-to-day workings of a vast industry that caters (sometimes literally) to brides' smallest needs. New Yorker writer Rebecca Mead registers the seismic shift that has reshaped our concept of weddings. She takes us from the squalid rooms of underpaid Chinese bridal gown factory workers to the elegant digs of elite wedding planners. Anybody contemplating that "one perfect day" or regretting what they spent on it should read this witty, alarming book.
Jonathan Yardley
How all of this came to pass -- how the American wedding escalated into an "out of control" business that pumps an astonishing $161 billion dollars a year into the economy -- and what forms it takes are the subjects of One Perfect Day, a revealing and intermittently amusing piece of journalism… It is a convincing picture of one of those strange parts of the American economy that make a great deal of money for a few people while going largely unnoticed by the rest of us.
— The Washington Post
Los Angeles Times
A sobering and sorely needed examination of how and why contemporary nuptials have turned into bank-breaking three-ring circuses.
USA Today
Bound to inspire more than a few couples to elope.
Publishers Weekly
In its nascence in the American lexicon, the term "Bridezilla" has inspired articles, reality television and watercooler tales of brides gone mad. This phenomenon piqued New Yorker staff writer Mead's interest, sending her on a three-year investigation of the current American wedding and the $161-billion industry that spawned it. "Blaming the bride," she writes, "wasn't an adequate explanation for what seemed to be underlying the concept of the Bridezilla: that weddings themselves were out of control." Interviewing wedding industry professionals and attending weddings in Las Vegas, Disney World, Aruba and a wedding town in Tennessee, Mead ventures beyond the tulle curtain to reveal moneymaking ploys designed around our most profound fears as well as our headiest happily-ever-after fantasies. Goods and services providers alter marital traditions-and even invent new ones-to feed their bottom line. Stores vie for bridal registry business in hopes of gaining lifelong customers. Women swoon for what retailers call "the "Oh, Mommy' moment" in boutique fitting rooms-an unsettling contrast to the Chinese bridal gown factory workers who make them possible, sleeping eight to a room and scraping by on 30 cents an hour. Part investigative journalism, part social commentary, Mead's wry, insightful work offers an illuminating glimpse at the ugly underbelly of our Bridezilla culture. (May) Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781440634024
  • Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 7/29/2008
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 1,118,134
  • File size: 276 KB

Meet the Author

Rebecca Mead has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1997. Before that, she was a contributing editor at New York magazine and a writer for the Sunday Times of London. She received her B.A. from Oxford University and her M.A. from N.Y.U.

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Table of Contents


Preface     1
Weddings 101     13
The Business of Brides     33
Inventing the Traditionalesque     55
"The 'Oh, Mommy' Moment"     75
"Your New {dollar}100 Billion Customer"     107
God and the Details     125
Love Me Tender     157
Manufacturing Memories     175
The New Elopement     197
Epilogue     219
Acknowledgments     231
Index     235
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 4, 2009

    Weddings gone amok

    Want a beautiful wedding you will remember? Read this book. It will tell you what NOT to do!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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