One-Pot Cakes: 60 Recipes for Cakes from Scratch Using a Pot, a Spoon, and a Pan

One-Pot Cakes: 60 Recipes for Cakes from Scratch Using a Pot, a Spoon, and a Pan

by Andrew Schloss, Ken Bookman
     
 

Leave it to Andrew Schloss and Ken Bookman, culinary problem solvers extraordinaire, to find a revolutionary way to make cakes from scratch without all the beating, sifting, and cleanup of traditional cake recipes. All you need is a pot, a spoon, and a pan.

Gone is the electric mixer. Gone is the arsenal of bowls and utentsils. Gone are the sifting of dry

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Overview

Leave it to Andrew Schloss and Ken Bookman, culinary problem solvers extraordinaire, to find a revolutionary way to make cakes from scratch without all the beating, sifting, and cleanup of traditional cake recipes. All you need is a pot, a spoon, and a pan.

Gone is the electric mixer. Gone is the arsenal of bowls and utentsils. Gone are the sifting of dry ingredients, the separating of eggs, the alternate adding of wet and dry ingredients. Instead, put all the ingredients in one pot, use one utensil to mix them, and pour the batter into a cake pan. That's it. Every cake is ready to pop into the oven in less than ten minutes.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
``I've done the impossible,'' announces Schloss, former director of the Restaurant School in Philadelphia. He may be right. New to the culinary curriculum, this is Cakes 101, more a celebration of cooking from scratch than a course in elaborate, dazzle-the-guests desserts. The one-pot method streamlines the baking process to its least complicated, something possible with just a wooden spoon, a heavy-bottomed, three-quart saucepan and the baking pan. The method includes such steps as half-melting the butter and bypassing sifting (baking power and soda are added in pinches). Recipes begin with a selection of 10 chocolate cakes (among them Devil's Food); other chapters embrace coffee cakes (Traditional Sour Cream Coffee Cake), cupcakes, flourless cakes (the Chocolate Almond Torte is worth the price of admission); fruit and vegetable cakes and sheet cakes all follow. The finishing touch is icing. Prepared with food editor Bookman, this selection isn't for the baker looking for a challenge but for the time-short cook seeking to please with a fresh-baked cake cooling on the counter. (Sept.)
Library Journal
Here are two baking books offering easy dessertsone of them, really easy desserts. Schloss and Bookman are the authors of Dinner's Ready (LJ 2/15/95), a good weekly menu-planning cookbook. Inspired by a friend's chocolate cake recipe, Schloss discovered how to put together a cake using just one pot or bowl and a wooden spoon, and he's come up with lots more chocolate cakes, cupcakes, coffee cakes, even bar cookies. Most take only minutes to prepare, but they are indeed cakes made from scratch, and most seem delicious. Haedrich is the author of several other cookbooks, including Country Breakfasts (LJ 11/15/94), but baking is his first love. His desserts range from homey to elegant, from Brownie Pudding Cake to Coffee Shortbread Cookies to Maple Mousse with Toasted Hazelnuts. They are simple to make but not always quick to prepare; usually, however, the different components for more complicated desserts can be made in advance. Haedrich writes well, and his recipes are so good and varied that most bakers will want to plunge right in. Both titles are recommended for most collections.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688141387
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/11/1995
Pages:
102
Product dimensions:
8.24(w) x 8.37(h) x 0.57(d)

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