One Potato, Two Potato: 300 Recipes from Simple to Elegant - Appetizers, Main Dishes, Side Dishes, and More

Overview


Everyone loves potatoes. This book transports cooks beyond the usual side dishes and introduces them to the secrets and specialties of great chefs and cooks the world over. Finamore shows how to prepare spectacularly simple appetizers, including dips, chips, and showstopping cocktail potatoes made from a few ordinary ingredients. He presents dozens of soups and salads, including rich Summer Vichyssoise and Herb Garden Potato Salad. There are more than fifty main-dish possibilities, such as Sunday Lamb with ...
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Boston 2001 New 0618007148. BRAND NEW, FLAWLESS, NEVER OPENED, PRISTINE--AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY--590 pages. From the inside front flap: " With this book, you'll learn the best ... methods for making the silkiest mashed potatoes, the crispiest fries, the fluffiest baked potatoes, and the most sumptuous gratins...Included as well is the potato's culinary cousin, the sweet potato, in dishes ranging from delightfully nostalgic baked sweet potatoes with marshmallows to spicy Vietnamese fritters served with a fiery dipping sauce. "; Read more Show Less

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Overview


Everyone loves potatoes. This book transports cooks beyond the usual side dishes and introduces them to the secrets and specialties of great chefs and cooks the world over. Finamore shows how to prepare spectacularly simple appetizers, including dips, chips, and showstopping cocktail potatoes made from a few ordinary ingredients. He presents dozens of soups and salads, including rich Summer Vichyssoise and Herb Garden Potato Salad. There are more than fifty main-dish possibilities, such as Sunday Lamb with Proper Roast Potatoes and Chicken Stuffed with Potatoes and Shiitake Mushrooms — not to mention a sophisticated rendition of Shepherd’s Pie. The potato turns up as the hidden ingredient in such breads as Potato Cheddar Bread with Chives and in such desserts as moist Farmhouse Chocolate Cake. Finamore shows how to master crisp steak fries, silky mashes, and sumptuous gratins. A bonus feature of the book is the sweet potato, in dishes from a delightfully nostalgic Baked Sweet Potatoes with Marshmallow to an urbane Semifreddo with Chocolate Sauce.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
The last few times I've made potatoes for guests, they fell on the dish as if it were chocolate, going for seconds and thirds and finally scraping out the little crusty bits from the baking dish with their forks. I have to conclude that people are potato-starved, which makes this all-spud cookbook all the more valuable.

Roy Finamore and Molly Stevens went through 1,500 pounds of potatoes (more than 20 varieties) on the way to testing and developing 300 potato recipes. There are recipes for dips, chips, soups, salads, main dishes, breads, and desserts. There are recipes for potatoes in their stand-alone glory -- baked and roasted, gratinéed and scalloped, mashed, fried, braised, and boiled. There are 31 (count 'em, 31!) recipes for potato salad alone, and the chapter on fried potatoes just may convince me that it's finally time to buy a mandoline.

Finamore has also done some excellent archival work, digging up great potato recipes from the files of such great cooks as Richard Olney, Diana Kennedy, Paula Wolfert, Tom Colicchio, Martha Stewart, and Jean Anderson. (Olney's Potatoes in Beer sounds particularly interesting.) He's drawn on the various ethnic classics -- potato kugel, potato gnocci, Swedish hasslebacks, potato pancakes, colcannon, Tunisian potato turnovers, and the Alasatian fluetters, or potato dumpling. (Take away the potato and it's clear that most of the world's cuisines, excepting Asian, would be severely damaged.) He also pays proper respect to the sweet potato, not a relative, botanically speaking, but certainly a kitchen cousin when it comes to gratins, mashes, and such.

One Potato, Two Potato also does a good job as a potato primer, explaining all the varieties, herbal soul mates, and storage principles. At last, I can figure out the difference between low-starch and high-starch potatoes, thanks to this tip from the book: "A simple test is to cut a raw potato in half with a large chef's knife; if there is a lot of white residue on the blade and if the potato seems to cling to the knife, it's starchy. If the potato leaves little residue without clinging, it's most likely waxy." Couldn't be simpler. (Ginger Curwen)

From the Publisher

If there were any doubt an ingredient as basic as the potato could result in exciting cooking, this tribute to the humble spud should dispel it. Cookbook editor Finamore and Fine Cooking magazine's Stevens have paired up to produce an impressive, wide-ranging potato Bible which covers everything one could hope to know about Solanum Tuberosum. The authors do a heroic job of categorizing the thousands of potato varieties, from waxy vs. starchy to news, blues, yellows and sweets.The 300-plus recipes are organized by different cooking techniques - soups, gratins, baked, roasted, fried (29 recipes for mashed alone!); each begins with a brisk run-through of potato science and chemistry. Ambitious home cooks will delight in fussy offerings like "Venison and Potato Stew Cooked in a Pumpkin" and the infamously tricky Pommes Souffles (aptly subtitled "Heartbreak Disguised as a Potato"). But even simple recipes (Basic Mashed Potatoes, Classic French Fries)have been carefully tested and scaled to yield consistent results. Traditional potato recipes from around the world - Vichyssoise, pierogi, samosas, shepherd's pie, red flannel hash, gnocchi, and latkes - all make an appearance. The authors have also secured recipesfor signature dishes by such celebrities as Martha Stewart, Tom Colicchio, Julie Sahni and Diana Kennedy. Although this is not the first potato cookbook on the market, it is certainly the most comprehensive; written with heart and humor and as versatile as the potato itself, this delightful volume should be at home on almost any cook's bookshelf. (9/10/01) Publishers Weekly, Starred

"In this encyclopedic tribute to the glories of the lowly tuber, celebrated cookbook editor Roy Finamore deploys potatoes in an astonishing 300 recipes... french fries, mashed potatoes, shepherd's pie - make this a sort of all-potato 'Joy of Cooking"...it's destined to be manhandled for years to come, until it turns into a spattered relic with a torn cover and crumbs between the pages. Such an inglorious but affectionate end will be fitting enough for this loving tribute." Boston Globe

Publishers Weekly
If there were any doubt an ingredient as basic as the potato could result in exciting cooking, this tribute to the humble spud should dispel it. Cookbook editor Finamore and Fine Cooking magazine's Stevens have paired up to produce an impressive, wide-ranging potato Bible which covers everything one could hope to know about Solanum Tuberosum. The authors do a heroic job of categorizing the thousands of potato varieties, from waxy vs. starchy to news, blues, yellows and sweets. The 300-plus recipes are organized by different cooking techniques soups, gratins, baked, roasted, fried (29 recipes for mashed alone!); each begins with a brisk run-through of potato science and chemistry. Ambitious home cooks will delight in fussy offerings like "Venison and Potato Stew Cooked in a Pumpkin" and the infamously tricky Pommes Souffl s (aptly subtitled "Heartbreak Disguised as a Potato"). But even simple recipes (Basic Mashed Potatoes, Classic French Fries) have been carefully tested and scaled to yield consistent results. Traditional potato recipes from around the world Vichyssoise, pierogi, samosas, shepherd's pie, red flannel hash, gnocchi, and latkes all make an appearance. The authors have also secured recipes for signature dishes by such celebrities as Martha Stewart, Tom Colicchio, Julie Sahni and Diana Kennedy. Although this is not the first potato cookbook on the market, it is certainly the most comprehensive; written with heart and humor and as versatile as the potato itself, this delightful volume should be at home on almost any cook's bookshelf. (Oct.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780618007141
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 10/28/2001
  • Pages: 592
  • Product dimensions: 9.30 (w) x 10.88 (h) x 1.77 (d)

Meet the Author


ROY FINAMORE has worked as a cookbook editor for thirty years, most recently at Clarkson Potter. Among the authors he has published are Martha Stewart, Ina Garten, Tom Colicchio, Diana Kennedy, Anne Willan, Gale Gand, and Lee Bailey. A cooking teacher, as well as a sought-after cookbook collaborator and food and prop stylist, his books include Tasty, which won a James Beard Award, and One Potato, Two Potato.
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Read an Excerpt


Classic French Fries Serves 4 to 6 This is as much a technique as it is a recipe. Two pounds of russets will give you enough fries for 4 to 6 people, but you can just cut up as many fries as you feel like eating. We do. Remember: this isn’t a last-minute side dish.
While we don’t say no to ketchup, we also like dipping our fries in mayonnaise.

2 pounds russet potatoes, peeled Oil for frying (peanut or a neutral vegetable oil) Coarse salt

Cut the potatoes lengthwise into 1/4-inch sticks. A mandoline is the tool you want to be using here, but if you don’t have one, here’s a good system: trim off a slice so the potato will lie tat on the cutting surface. Cut the potato into 1/4-inch-thick slices, then make manageable stacks of the slices and cut again, this time into sticks. Drop the potatoes into a big bowl of cold water as you cut them. Leave the potatoes to soak for at least 2 hours. If you’ve got room, pop the bowl into the refrigerator; if not, and you’ve got the bowl out on the counter, add ice cubes to keep it cold.
Pour at least 3 inches of oil into a large pot; do not Tll the pot more than half full. Heat the oil to 325 degrees. While the oil heats, drain the potatoes, lay them out on clean towels, and blot them completely dry with paper towels. Heat up a skimmer or slotted spoon for the stirring and retrieval of the fries (just put it in with the oil).
Grab a handful of potatoes and drop them into the oil. Not too many, so you don’t lower the temperature. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, stirring once in a while for even frying. The spuds will be beginning to go limp and will show just the slightest hint of gold. Lift them out with your handy heated skimmer and drain them on paper towels.
Once you’ve prefried all the fries, spread them on trays and refrigerate for 2 hours.
Come dinnertime, heat the oil to 375 degrees and heat up that skimmer. Drop in the fries, again by handfuls and again not crowding them, and fry, stirring for even browning, until they are perfectly golden and crisp, 3 to 4 minutes. Drain on paper towels, sprinkle with salt, and serve hot.

Variations

Steak Fries These sturdy hand-cut fries sit so nicely next to a juicy, thick steak. They’ll never be as crisp as classic fries, but we love their creamier, potato-ier tavor. Leave the peels on for these, but scrub the spuds well.

Follow the method above, cutting the potatoes by hand into 1/2-inch sticks. The prefrying will take longer, 5 to 7 minutes. The second fry should be about the same, 3 to 4 minutes.

Herbed French Fries Follow the method above, but while the potatoes chill, prepare 1 cup mixed herb leaves (a combination of parsley, thyme, basil, and oregano is nice). Wash and dry the leaves thoroughly. After you’ve fried the last handful of potatoes, drop the herbs into the oil. Attention: they will spatter wildly, so stand back. Scoop out the herbs with the skimmer as soon as they crisp, which will take a mere 30 to 45 seconds. Scatter the herbs over the fries and serve.

Copyright © 2001 Roy Finamore. Reprinted by permission of Houghton Mifflin Company.

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Table of Contents


Introduction Potato Principles Notes for the Cook

Appetizers and First Courses Soups Salads Main Dishes Mashed Potatoes Fried Potatoes Baked and Roasted Potatoes Gratins and Scalloped Potatoes Braised Potatoes Boiled Potatoes Breads and Rolls Desserts

Bibliography Index

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Recipe

POTATOES ROASTED IN SALT

No proportions here, just a method. The potatoes come out of the salt all wrinkly and with an amazingly tender texture. Once the salt has cooled down, you can pack it into a jar and reuse it for roasting several times. Just add more salt when you need it.

There is no more elegant way of serving these potatoes than slicing them in half and topping with a dollop of sour cream and as much caviar as you dare. If this isn't going to be a Beluga evening, go for salmon roe. Or try any of the dips and sauces [in this book]. You can even, should you care to, use any of the butters in the chapter of boiled potatoes.

Coarse salt
Small red-skinned or heirloom potatoes, scrubbed

Heat the oven to 400° F.

Spread a layer of salt in a deep baking dish or casserole large enough to hold the potatoes in a single layer. Put them in the dish and cover completely with more salt.

Roast the potatoes for 50 to 60 minutes, or until tender. Poke them with a skewer or the tip of a small knife to check. Dump the potatoes out onto a tray and knock off the salt.

Slice the potatoes in half and move them to a serving dish (placing them on a bed of salt is pretty). Top them in the kitchen if you want, or pass with a dipping sauce.

Variation: Paula Wolfert's Potatoes Baked in Sea Salt
An enameled cast-iron cocotte (Dutch oven) with a tight-fitting lid is essential for this dish. Paula's salt of choice is sea salt from the Ile de ré in France, but a combination of any coarse sea salt and kosher salt will be fine.

Wash and dry 1 1/2 pounds small red-skinned potatoes. Spread 1 1/2 cups sea salt in the bottom of the cocotte and sit the potatoes on top in a single layer. Take off the cover and let the potatoes sit for 5 minutes. Brush off the salt and serve. This is enough for 6 to 8 for cocktails.

CHEZ LOUIS POTATO CAKE
Serves 6 to 8

Since the 1930s, hungry Parisians and visitors have paid homage to the famous potato cake at the legendary L'Ami Louis bistro. But there's a debate about it: Are the potatoes pre-cooked or not? Now, literary agent Susan Lescher is an ardent admirer of both the restaurant and the dish, and she led me to this version by David Liederman. This, she assures me, has the goods. Whether she's right or not isn't the point. For me, this is an amazingly beautiful and completely delicious dish. It's a perfect rustic cake meant to be served with roast chicken.

The quantities will sound impressive for the number of servings, but try it. You probably won't be able to stop eating it either.

Read this through once or twice before you start, and be prepared to dirty a lot of pots. It's worth it. And one more thing: a 12-inch cast-iron skillet is key. It won't work in a smaller or lighter pan. But that's not saying you can't halve the quantities and bake the cake in a 9-inch cast-iron pan.

5 pounds russet potatoes, peeled
Coarse salt
3/4 pound (3 sticks) unsalted butter
Freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic
2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley

Place the potatoes in a large pot with water to cover them by at least an inch. Add a good pinch of salt, bring to a boil, and cook for 15 to 20 minutes. The potatoes should be slightly underdone, so you'll feel resistance when you test them with a skewer or larding needle. (They will finish cooking when you brown and bake them.)

While the potatoes are cooking, put a 12-inch-cast-iron skillet into the oven and turn on the heat to 450° F.

Drain the potatoes and place them in a second large skillet over medium-high heat. Season liberally with salt and pepper, cut in 2 sticks of the butter, and start chopping the potatoes into uneven hunks (about 2 inches) with the side of a large metal spoon. Keep turning the pieces over in the butter so they brown evenly. This should take about 1 minute.

Meanwhile, melt the remaining stick of butter in a small saucepan. When the potatoes have browned, take the iron skillet out of the oven, pour in the butter, and immediately add the potatoes. (The skillet needs to be smoking hot -- and if you tried to melt the butter in it, it would burn.) Press down with the back of your metal spoon or a spatula to flatten the cake in the skillet. Cook it over medium-high heat for 3 minutes, then pop it in the oven and bake for 15 minutes.

Take the skillet from the oven and carefully pour off any butter (you can save this butter and recycle it if you want). Cover the skillet with a heavy flat baking sheet and invert it so the pie falls out onto the sheet. Put the pie back in the oven and bake for 15 minutes. Remove it from the oven and pour off any of the butter in the pan. Carefully slide the pie onto a flat serving dish.

The garnish is a circle of chopped garlic around the center of the pie, surrounded by a larger circle of parsley. But you might just want to combine the garlic and parsley and scatter it evenly over the top. Serve this hot, cut into wedges.

MARTHA STEWART'S MASHED POTATOES
Serves 6 to 8

This is vintage Martha. Rich, luxurious, and creamy mashed potatoes. They are indeed, as Martha says, "infinitely edible."

The potatoes here are yellow-fleshed [Yukon Gold or Yellow Finn], and their color adds to the impression that these are the richest potatoes you've ever eaten. Russets are thirstier; you'll need to add more cream if you use them for this dish.

Take the cream cheese out of the refrigerator well in advance; it needs to be squishy soft. If not, it thickens the potatoes too much and they're hell to beat.

2-1/2 pounds yellow-fleshed potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
Coarse salt
8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened
8 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
1/4 cup heavy cream, warmed
Freshly ground black pepper

Put the potatoes in a large saucepan, cover with cold water by at least an inch, add a good pinch of salt, and bring to a boil. Cover partway, reduce the heat to medium, and cook until the potatoes are tender. Drain the potatoes, return them to the pot, and put them back over the heat to dry them. Shake the pan and stir until the potatoes are floury and have made and have made a film on the bottom of the pan.

Put the potatoes through a ricer and return them to the pan, over very low heat, or mash them until perfectly smooth with a hand masher. Beat in the butter, about one-third at a time, with a wooden spoon. Cut the cream cheese into bits and beat that in thirds. Pour in the cream, stir until it's absorbed, and then beat the potatoes vigorously with a wooden spoon. Season to taste with salt and pepper and serve right away, so they're good and hot.

Copyright © 2001 by Roy Finamore.

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