×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

One Quiet Morning
     

One Quiet Morning

by Helena Clare Pittman
 
Gerald's concentration is broken by a variety of noisy interruptions as he tries to write a poem for school. Finally, early one morning, it's quiet, and, describing the morning, the poem comes to him. Written by the author of Counting Jennie ( C. 1994), this sensitive portrayal offers an insightful look at the creative process.

Overview

Gerald's concentration is broken by a variety of noisy interruptions as he tries to write a poem for school. Finally, early one morning, it's quiet, and, describing the morning, the poem comes to him. Written by the author of Counting Jennie ( C. 1994), this sensitive portrayal offers an insightful look at the creative process.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Trying to write a poem for school, Gerald is distracted by a sequence of noises: hair dryer, helicopter, backfiring car, chainsaw, boom box. "It's too noisy to think," sighs his apple-pie-baking Gram, who misses the tranquility of her youth ("There were all the sounds of life, but not so muchnoise"). The next morning, the boy finds inspiration in the "wisps of pink streak[ing] the sky" and the "dew sparkl[ing] on a spider's web," etc., and he finally gets his poem on paper. Presented largely as a pastiche of sounds, thoughts and dialogue, Pittman's (Counting Jennie) subdued text never quite coalesces, and readers may easily lose interest, especially as Gerald's paean to nature reinforces tiresome clichs about poetry and what constitutes a proper subject for a poem. Illustrations in the first part of the book, presumably reflecting the protagonist's jumbled thoughts, portray the noise-making objects and scraps of pages from Gerald's notebook. Gerald's nature poem, by contrast, is accompanied by peaceful, traditional watercolors of birds, flowers and insects. Gram's nostalgic aesthetic has triumphed. Ages 5-8. (July)
Children's Literature - Deborah Zink Roffino
Gram helps her grandson Gerald with a poem he must write as schoolwork. In the process, she does some inspiring reminiscing about the way things used to be-quieter, simpler. As Gerald searches for that world, he and Gram manage to find bits of it together and discover the bonds between the generations that link the past with the present.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4Gerald can't complete a poetry assignment because of noisy interference from hair dryers, chain saws, cars, and radios. Gram tells him about the quieter days of her childhood, and he longs for a life with fewer interruptions. However, an early morning quiet time gives him the serenity he needs to complete his poem, and he and Gram decide that the world hasn't changed so drastically after all. The watercolor and cut-paper collage art tries to reflect the text, with jarring hues and jagged edges interrupting complete images on the "noisy" pages and peaceful scenes of nature accompanying Gerald's poem. But Pittman is better with words than with pictures. Her people look slightly green, their postures are stiff, and the illustrations on the whole have an amateurish quality.Kathy Piehl, Mankato State University, MN

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780876148389
Publisher:
Lerner Publishing Group
Publication date:
02/01/1995
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.22(w) x 10.25(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews