One Soul Now

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Twenty years into their career, these Canadians have, in some ways, settled into a groove that's comfortable to both them and their cadre of fans. One Soul Now, however, is more a conglomeration of -- as that old wedding tradition would have it -- something old and something new than a rehashing of Junkie-dom past. The band's first studio outing in more than three years, the disc is certainly peppered with the languor that characterizes the Junkies' best-known material -- singer Margo Timmins is at her most ethereal on the appropriately titled "Notes Falling Slow." Yet One Soul Now is palpably more dynamic than might be expected. Michael Timmins's angular guitar ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Twenty years into their career, these Canadians have, in some ways, settled into a groove that's comfortable to both them and their cadre of fans. One Soul Now, however, is more a conglomeration of -- as that old wedding tradition would have it -- something old and something new than a rehashing of Junkie-dom past. The band's first studio outing in more than three years, the disc is certainly peppered with the languor that characterizes the Junkies' best-known material -- singer Margo Timmins is at her most ethereal on the appropriately titled "Notes Falling Slow." Yet One Soul Now is palpably more dynamic than might be expected. Michael Timmins's angular guitar riffing lends a post-punk tension to "Why This One," while the whole combo pitches in to buoy the unreconstructed optimism of "Stars of Our Stars." The overall vibe of the disc is -- not surprisingly -- rather introspective, with many songs (most notably "My Wild Child" and "No Long Journey Home") mulling over the puzzlement of encroaching middle age. That's an unusual move in a realm where perpetual adolescence is the order of the day, but the Cowboy Junkies have always been prone to unusual moves.
All Music Guide - Ronnie D. Lankford
While it seems more common in the '80s, '90s, and beyond for a good band to remain intact for ten-plus years, they all face the same challenge: how does one continue to keep the music fresh and remain relevant? The Cowboy Junkies faced an uphill battle from the get-go, always living in the shadow of The Trinity Session 1988, and moving from the mainstream including major labels, radio play, and a gig on Saturday Night Live to just under the radar. Despite these changes, the Junkies have still been able to make great albums, like 1992's Black Eyed Man and 2001's Open. Both of these albums also showed a band willing to delve into new sounds country and classic rock, respectively and come up winners. One Soul Now seems to pick up where Open left off, retaining the tougher sound highlighted by edgy guitar work and a more rhythmic pulse. The title cut opens with acoustic guitar before transforming into a sleepy rocker that manages to be seductive and sinister at the same time. Margo Timmins' vocals are hypnotically lovely as usual, merging with bluesy guitar riffs and emerging above the morass as the chorus kicks in. Here, and on the following cut, "Why This One," it's easy to believe that the Junkies are going to pull off another coup. The arrangements and production of both cuts seem to bring a perfect balance to these songs, and the execution is handled with confidence. On second listen, however, Michael Timmins' songs tend to float more than move, and by the time the listener reaches the third cut, "My Wild Child," a familiar complaint against the Junkies emerges: the songs begin to fade into one another, more somnolent than hypnotic. Perhaps that's why a number of the later cuts choose different approaches by adding everything from organ to accordion to handclaps. Unfortunately, the guitar work on "Hunting Grounds" sounds like an outtake from "Dark Hole Again" on Open, while "Stars of Our Stars" seems cheerfully dissident from the surrounding material. Similar complaints can be made against the remainder of the album, with the Junkies veering between lethargic rockers like "Call You Baby" to atypically upbeat pieces like "No Long Journey Home." Longtime fans, wondering what the Cowboy Junkies have been up to for the last three years, will probably find several songs to like on One Soul Now. Newcomers will be much happier by picking up Open.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 6/8/2004
  • Label: Zoe Records
  • UPC: 601143103629
  • Catalog Number: 431036
  • Sales rank: 267,327

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Cowboy Junkies Primary Artist
Alan Anton Bass, Group Member
Jeff Bird Percussion, Melodica, Electric Mando Cello
Jaro Czerwinec Accordion
Linford Detweiler Organ
Margo Timmins Vocals, Group Member
Michael Timmins Guitar, Group Member
Peter Timmins Drums, Group Member
Technical Credits
Dave Houghton Art Direction
Michael Timmins Composer, Producer, Engineer, Audio Production
Daryl Smith Engineer
Peter J. Moore Mastering
James Reeder Images, Cover Image
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    Posted November 22, 2009

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