One Whole and Perfect Day

One Whole and Perfect Day

4.3 6
by Judith Clarke
     
 

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This wholly satisfying Michael L. Printz Honor Book is told from multiple points of view. Lily Samson both loves and is embarrassed by her eccentric family. Her grandmother has an invisible friend; her grandfather is a racist (she believes); her mother brings elderly clients home from work for dinner; and her older brother keeps dropping in and out of school. Lily

Overview

This wholly satisfying Michael L. Printz Honor Book is told from multiple points of view. Lily Samson both loves and is embarrassed by her eccentric family. Her grandmother has an invisible friend; her grandfather is a racist (she believes); her mother brings elderly clients home from work for dinner; and her older brother keeps dropping in and out of school. Lily wishes her family could be “normal” for just one day. Then serendipity strikes. Through a series of surprising encounters, Lily’s family members all reach new understanding about themselves and make changes for the better—and Lily gets her dream of one whole and perfect day.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Writing with the same warmth and humor that characterized her earliest novels (the Al Capsella series), Clarke introduces a new cast of endearingly eccentric characters who are drawn together to enjoy "one whole and perfect day." Seventeen-year-old Lily, the youngest, most "sensible" member of the Samson clan, has well-founded misgivings about the upcoming 80th birthday party for Pop, her grandfather. She is sure something will go wrong (as it always does) when her unpredictable relatives unite, still she hopes for the "perfect day" of the book's title. Pop himself is having a feud with Lily's shiftless brother Lonnie, and has even threatened him with an ax, causing Lonnie to leave home and move into an apartment. Pop's wife, Nan, who is as soft as Pop is gruff, might be considered normal were it not for her invisible best friend, Sef. Then there's Lily's psychologist mother, who works in an adult day-care center and is always bringing home "old people whose care-giver children were quite desperate for a little break." While the novel mainly focuses on Lily's exasperation with her family's peculiarities, the third-person narrative shifts among other characters' points of view, which reveal old resentments as well as their mutual affections, affections that prove to be more deep-rooted than grudges. Filled with surprising turns of events and serendipitous encounters with strangers (who ultimately take on significance in the story), this book celebrates rekindled friendship and blossoming romance. Ages 12-up. (Mar.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
VOYA - Stephanie Petruso
Lily's small family is falling apart. Her father disappeared long ago, and her mother puts taking care of her neglected elderly patients ahead of Lily and their house. Her only brother, Lonnie, moved away after being disowned by their grandfather for being unable to commit to a career, and her grandmother talks to an imaginary friend named Sef. As her grandfather's eightieth birthday approaches, Lily wants nothing more than for her family to forget their problems and grudges, and for once, have a perfect day together. Australian Clarke takes readers into the minds of each member of a very large cast of characters as they learn to be less judgmental and more forgiving. Unfortunately this lack of focus detracts from the story. Subplots about Lonnie's girlfriend and her parents, who also are not speaking; his girlfriend's roommate; and a homeless girl on the train keep readers from becoming attached to any one character. In addition, the reasons behind the family rifts seem insubstantial, and some major issues, such as the grandfather's racism, are solved too quickly and simply. It leads, through a number of improbable coincidences, to a large extended family reunion at Pop's birthday party. The novel can be suggested to younger teens or those looking for books with no objectionable content. Even with that criteria, though, there are more engrossing choices dealing with family relationships, such as books by Joan Bauer.
From the Publisher

* "Filled with surprising turns of events and serendipitous encounters with strangers (who ultimately take on significance in the story), this book celebrates rekindled friendship and blossoming romance." --Publishers Weekly, starred review

* --Horn Book

"Reminiscent of Perkins' Criss Cross (BCCB 9/05), this Australian import will appeal especially to fans of strong character development and alternating points of view." --Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781620910252
Publisher:
Highlights Press
Publication date:
04/01/2013
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
248
Sales rank:
775,230
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.70(d)
Lexile:
840L (what's this?)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Judith Clarke has written many award-winning young adult novels including Night Train, The Lost Day, and Al Capsella and the Watchdogs. She lives in Melbourne, Australia.

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One Whole and Perfect Day 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Puddles More than 1 year ago
My family received an advance copy of the audio CD version of this book. We listened to it traveling up the California coast a few weeks ago. The car has never been so captivated (or quiet) during a road trip as it was when we listened to this audio book. Truly a pleasure! Judith Clarke and Gretal Montgomery are a winning combination. The writing is clever, fun, and appropriate for all ages. The narration skillfully conveys the sense of the text to the listener at all times (the Australian accent is pleasant and subtle- just enough and not overpowering for my daughters' understanding). Hope to see more books/audio from this combination.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
i really enjoyed this book! i thought the plot was laid out well and the amount of coincidences made the story interesting! i love the eccentricity added to all the characters and their individuality. definitely worth reading!
Guest More than 1 year ago
the whole book is basically built on Lily having her 'perfect day that's whole' but in the book lily doesn't even have the party, and there's no action with that daniel steadman guy. The ending was too abrupt and the book is basically about her family and their problems.. not much about there with lily just that she was so looking forward to the party but the book ended without there even being a party... just the before celebration and how it 'is' going to be a perfect day with everybody there to celebrate pop's birthday.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book started out slow, and I had my doubts. As I kept reading though, I learned more about the characters and found something to like about each of them. The book switches nararators, which keeps it interesting. The story is great and revolves around all the characters in different ways, making it a very good book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Samsons are no ordinary family. There's the endearing grandmother May, the stout and stubborn Pop, and their daughter Marigold. Then there is the dreamy and 'poetic' Lonnie, and Lily, the only 'sensible' one in in the clan. As May plans Pop's eighieth birthday party, Lily desperately tries to reconcile Lonnie and Pop from a falling out over college majors and Lonnie's shiftlessness...All she hopes for is that 'one whole and perfect day'-the day her family can never seem to have. A novel filled with unexpected twists and turns, each hilarious character makes the book worth reading, and the sharp and often humorous prose becomes a surprising ending, one riddled with serendipity.