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Oneness: Great Principles Shared by All Religions [NOOK Book]

Overview

"An impressive array of selections. They show common ethics that transcend the narrow confines of sectarianism."
ATLANTA JOURNAL & CONSTITUTION
Beneath the seeming differences of all the world's great religions, lies a pool of universal truth. ONENESS collects these beliefs together for the first time, in the actual words of each religion's scriptures. These universal principles act as a guide to inner ...
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Oneness: Great Principles Shared by All Religions

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Overview

"An impressive array of selections. They show common ethics that transcend the narrow confines of sectarianism."
ATLANTA JOURNAL & CONSTITUTION
Beneath the seeming differences of all the world's great religions, lies a pool of universal truth. ONENESS collects these beliefs together for the first time, in the actual words of each religion's scriptures. These universal principles act as a guide to inner development, and allow each individual to achieve spiritual richness.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Moses, a freelance writer and advertising executive with a special interest in meditation and stress reduction techniques, draws on his studies of world scriptures to offer this interfaith compilation of assorted verses affirming similar principles, e.g., the Golden Rule. For each of the 28 principles included, Moses begins with brief thoughts of his own about half a page, then offers a two-page spread of five or six relevant scriptural passages. This is an interesting idea, but the book would be more useful if the passages were identified explicitly as to source, rather than just being designated ``Islam,'' ``Christianity,'' ``Buddhism,'' etc.
From the Publisher
“As this book shows . . . every major religion of the world has similar ideas of love [and] the same goal of benefiting humanity through spiritual practice.”
—The Dalai Lama

“An impressive array of selections. They show common ethics that transcend the narrow confines of sectarianism.”
—Atlanta Journal-Constitution

“Brilliant . . . [A] very important book.”
—Jewish Civic Press

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307416339
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 12/18/2007
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 909,468
  • File size: 678 KB

Read an Excerpt

The Golden Rule

The Golden Rule is the cornerstone of religious understanding. It is the most complete expression of the Oneness of all people, serving as the foundation for peace and universal goodwill on earth.

The Golden Rule is expressed almost word for word in every religion. So fundamental is it to all religious thought that the founders and enlightened teachers of every religion have commented on it directly.

Jesus referred to the Golden Rule as "the law and the prophets." Mohammed described it as "the noblest expression of religion." Rabbi Hillel stated in the Jewish Talmud that the Golden Rule is "the whole of the Torah and the remainder is but commentary." Vyasa, the enlightened Hindu sage, called it "the sum of all true righteousness." Similarly, Buddha referred to it as "the sum total of all righteousness." And Confucius, the great Chinese master, deemed it "the one principle upon which one's whole life may proceed."

Many people are taught from childhood that living the Golden Rule is an ideal, without emphasizing the practical benefits. When people look upon others as extensions of themselves, all obstacles to fulfillment are removed-both for individuals and society. When the goals of every individual are supported by the activities of every other person, the world has the possibility to flourish in peace and prosperity. For this reason, the Golden Rule should not be thought of as a vague ideal. It is a practical principle that embodies the deepest aspirations of humanity. It serves as the basis for all that is positive and lasting in human life.

Y

The Golden Rule

Do unto others as you would have them do unto you, for this is the law and the prophets.

Christianity

What is hurtful to yourself do not to your fellow man. That is the whole of the Torah and the remainder is but commentary.

Judaism

Do unto all men as you would they should unto you, and reject for others what you would reject for yourself.

Islam

Hurt not others with that which pains yourself.

Buddhism

The Golden Rule

Tzu Kung asked: "Is there any one principle upon which one's whole life may proceed?" Confucius replied: "Is not Reciprocity such a principle?-what you do not yourself desire, do not put before others."

Confucianism

This is the sum of all true righteousness-

Treat others, as thou wouldst thyself be treated.

Do nothing to thy neighbor, which hereafter

Thou wouldst not have thy neighbor do to thee.

Hinduism

Treat others as thou wouldst be treated thyself.

Sikhism

A man should wander about treating all creatures as he himself would be treated.

Jainism

Regard your neighbor's gain as your own gain; and regard your neighbor's loss as your own loss, even as though you were in their place.

Taoism

Ascribe not to any soul that which thou wouldst not have ascribed to thee.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

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First Chapter

The Golden Rule

The Golden Rule is the cornerstone of religious understanding. It is the most complete expression of the Oneness of all people, serving as the foundation for peace and universal goodwill on earth.

The Golden Rule is expressed almost word for word in every religion. So fundamental is it to all religious thought that the founders and enlightened teachers of every religion have commented on it directly.

Jesus referred to the Golden Rule as "the law and the prophets." Mohammed described it as "the noblest expression of religion." Rabbi Hillel stated in the Jewish Talmud that the Golden Rule is "the whole of the Torah and the remainder is but commentary." Vyasa, the enlightened Hindu sage, called it "the sum of all true righteousness." Similarly, Buddha referred to it as "the sum total of all righteousness." And Confucius, the great Chinese master, deemed it "the one principle upon which one's whole life may proceed."

Many people are taught from childhood that living the Golden Rule is an ideal, without emphasizing the practical benefits. When people look upon others as extensions of themselves, all obstacles to fulfillment are removed-both for individuals and society. When the goals of every individual are supported by the activities of every other person, the world has the possibility to flourish in peace and prosperity. For this reason, the Golden Rule should not be thought of as a vague ideal. It is a practical principle that embodies the deepest aspirations of humanity. It serves as the basis for all that is positive and lasting in human life.

Y

The GoldenRule

Do unto others as you would have them do unto you, for this is the law and the prophets.

Christianity

What is hurtful to yourself do not to your fellow man. That is the whole of the Torah and the remainder is but commentary.

Judaism

Do unto all men as you would they should unto you, and reject for others what you would reject for yourself.

Islam

Hurt not others with that which pains yourself.

Buddhism

The Golden Rule

Tzu Kung asked: "Is there any one principle upon which one's whole life may proceed?" Confucius replied: "Is not Reciprocity such a principle?-what you do not yourself desire, do not put before others."

Confucianism

This is the sum of all true righteousness-

Treat others, as thou wouldst thyself be treated.

Do nothing to thy neighbor, which hereafter

Thou wouldst not have thy neighbor do to thee.

Hinduism

Treat others as thou wouldst be treated thyself.

Sikhism

A man should wander about treating all creatures as he himself would be treated.

Jainism

Regard your neighbor's gain as your own gain; and regard your neighbor's loss as your own loss, even as though you were in their place.

Taoism

Ascribe not to any soul that which thou wouldst not have ascribed to thee.

Copyright 2002 by Jeffrey Moses
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 4 of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 12, 2012

    NOT RECOMMENDED

    I purchased this book for a Sunday School class. My first mistake was that I had not seen the cover of the book the class was using. They are using an earlier edition of the book. The bad new is that the author decided to leave several topics out of the more recent edition; therefore, I did not have all of the material needed to participate in the class. Regarding the book, it is relatively easy reading - a topic followed by the "sayings" of several different religions related to the topic. However, the not all of the same religions' sayings follow the topic - many are missing from topic to topic. Therefore, a complete comparison is really not possible. And how the topics are handled are not consistent either. Finally, there is not enough substance in the book to really make a full comparison of all of the religions. The book simply is not structured well and is not complete.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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