The Only Grant-Writing Book You'll Ever Need

The Only Grant-Writing Book You'll Ever Need

3.1 39
by Ellen Karsh, Arlen Sue Fox
     
 

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Written by two expert authors who have won millions of dollars in government and foundation grants—and revised to include vital up-to-the minute interviews with grantmakers, policy makers, and nonprofit leaders about seeking grants in today’s economic climate—this new edition of the classic book on grant seeking provides a comprehensive,

Overview


Written by two expert authors who have won millions of dollars in government and foundation grants—and revised to include vital up-to-the minute interviews with grantmakers, policy makers, and nonprofit leaders about seeking grants in today’s economic climate—this new edition of the classic book on grant seeking provides a comprehensive, step-by-step guide for grant writers.

INCLUDING:
•CONCRETE SUGGESTIONS FOR DEVELOPING EACH SECTION OF A PROPOSAL
•HANDS-ON EXERCISES THAT LET YOU PRACTICE WHAT YOU LEARN
•A GLOSSARY OF TERMS
•FUNDERS ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS THAT EXPLAIN WHY THEY AWARD GRANTS…AND WHY THEY DON’T
•ROUNDTABLE ON GRANTSMANSHIP AND THE ECONOMY

The Only Grant-Writing Book You’ll Ever Need demystifies the process and reveals indispensable advice, continuing to be essential reading for grant seekers everywhere.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“The best current thinking . . . . The quotes from funders alone are worth the price of admission. . . . Attractive. . . . A must-have money reference.”
Booklist

“The book includes a proposal checklist, a glossary of terms, sample grant forms, and a list of Web sites that provide information on grants offered by foundations, corporations, and the government.”
Chronicle of Philanthropy

“Karsh and Fox provide 18 highly readable lessons in how to write a grant and what to do once you get one … Bottom line: A fine and easy-to-use self-tutorial.”
—David Loertscher, Teacher Librarian Magazine

Booklist
Veteran grant writers Karsh and Fox not only rely on years of experience but also on interviews with dozens of foundations, associations, and government organizations to provide readers the best current thinking around a very tedious subject. What's more, the book's organization is attractive; 16 lessons, each prefaced with a truth-is-stranger anecdote and then expanded via a series of questions and answers and discussion and tested with pop quizzes, from fill in the blanks to independent study. The quotes from funders alone are worth the price of admission: "Less than 10 percent of proposals fit our guidelines." "I hate it when budgets make no sense." "Make it easier to use, with headings, bullets . . ." Yet, hands down, the appendixes win: 50 tips to improve your chances to win a grant and a proposal checklist, glossary, sample grant forms, representative list of community foundations, web sites, regional associations of grant makers, and answers to pop quizzes. A must-have money reference. — Barbara Jacobs

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780465058938
Publisher:
Basic Books
Publication date:
04/08/2014
Edition description:
Fourth Edition, Fourth Edition
Pages:
409
Sales rank:
40,890
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.30(d)

Meet the Author


Ellen Karsh was the director of the New York City’s Mayor’s Office of Grants Administration for more than seven years under both Mayor Giuliani and Mayor Bloomberg, and previously developed and wrote grants for the New York City Department of Education for five years. She received her doctorate in special education from Teachers College, Columbia University and has written for Newsweek and the New York Times, among other publications. She lives in New York City.

Arlen Sue Fox was director of research, planning, and evaluation for the New York City Commission on Human Rights for ten years and consultant to nonprofit organizations, from small grassroots groups to national organizations including AARP, for twelve years. Recently retired from a position as executive director for development at Sunnyside Community Services, she is currently writing and editing. Fox lives in New York City.

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The Only Grant-Writing Book You'll Ever Need 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 39 reviews.
bluejens234 More than 1 year ago
This is a great reference book for any grantwriter to have. The book is clear and offers many tips and suggestions for writing a successful grant. It would be a great addition to a nonprofit agency's library for a reference tool, and for anybody wanting to learn about how to write a successful grant.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fox and Karsh have compiled all of the necessary tips to grant writing in a fun, easy-to-read work of genius. I can personally account for their brilliance since I just recently received a grant to construct a website for the school system in my town. Their book served as a continuous reference for me as I constructed my grant proposal. It is obvious that these two magnificent writers have a wealth of experience and knowledge that they have graciously decided to impart upon all of us. I am deeply grateful for their advice and will forever speak highly of this extraordinary guide to grant writing. Thank you Fox and Karsh!
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a first time grant writer, this book was the most concise and helpful that I have purchased so far .... thank you, Ellen and Arlen, for making me confident in this process.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I purchased this book because it was the most popular purchase. But then I purchased it for the wrong reason.  I am college educated and have written many research papers. My impression of the writer of this book is they are an English Major trying to write instruction and technical information. Which does not mix.  They presented very long winded information that was duplicated over and over within the book. I have never read so many examples that do not get into the nuts and bolts of the actual writing a grant request.  The writer put extra effort into telling what you are going to read in another lesson. When you arrive to page 118, they use the whole page to explain what again is cover in the next group of lessons. Then once you arrive in that lesson, they will say “what we said in lesson.” By the time I got to page 121, I stopped reading and started skimming for actual grant write instruction. Since the writer was so focus on giving you example of what someone else did and it did not work. I would suggest that you to the last 50 pages of the book to start reading, at some point they do provide an example of an actual completed grant application. I will never purchase another book written by Ellen Karsh or Arlen Sue Fox.
PeggyH60 More than 1 year ago
Highly organized, timely, up-to-date and easy to understand
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
RolfDobelli More than 1 year ago
Veteran grant writers and nonprofit funding development specialists Ellen Karsh and Arlen Sue Fox again combine their vast experience in this updated third edition of their best-selling handbook for preparing successful grant proposals to foundations and government agencies. Whether you are a veteran grant writer or whether you are new to grantsmanship, you are sure to learn fresh strategies and effective techniques for presenting solid, well-designed proposals. Full of information, explanations, practical advice and examples, the book provides an appendix featuring 50 useful tips, a proposal checklist, a glossary, sample grant forms, a state-by-state directory of community foundations and a list of important websites. The book also presents a revealing “Funders’ Roundtable” of grant makers discussing the effects of the 2008 economic recession. getAbstract recommends that serious grant writers – and those who aspire to be – keep a copy within reach at all times.
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All good.
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