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Only Love
     

Only Love

4.2 4
by Erich Segal
 

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He gave us Love Story cherished by millions. Now, New York Times bestselling author Erich Segal presents a new novel of remembrance and reunion--an unforgettable testament to the power of hope and love...

Dr. Matthew Hiller is about to face the most difficult moment of his life.

The brilliant neurosurgeon has encountered desperate people. But his

Overview

He gave us Love Story cherished by millions. Now, New York Times bestselling author Erich Segal presents a new novel of remembrance and reunion--an unforgettable testament to the power of hope and love...

Dr. Matthew Hiller is about to face the most difficult moment of his life.

The brilliant neurosurgeon has encountered desperate people. But his next case is not simply a suffering patient for whom he is the last hope. It is Sylvia--his only love. Now married to one of the richest men in the world, she can still evoke the same feelings in him that she did so long ago in Paris and Africa. Even after all this time, he has not recovered from her unexplained disappearance on the eve of their marriage--and thoughts of her have haunted him ever since.

As a doctor, he must try to help her. As a spurned lover, and a married man, he must try to forget the past. And he dares not think about what might happen if he actually succeeds in saving her life...

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Already slated for a 1998 Hallmark Entertainment miniseries, this tale of older-and-wiser deathbed romance from the popular Segal (Love Story; Oliver's Story; etc.) sacrifices grand passion to pleasantly formulaic plotting and self-satisfied resignation. Narrator Dr. Matthew Hiller's past and present collide when beautiful, rich Silvia Rinaldi turns to the world-renowned physician to cure a malignant brain tumor. Silvia is not just any patient; 18 years earlier, she and Matt were colleagues, idealistic young Medical International doctors in Africa, where they saved lives and became lovers. After an accident nearly killed Matt, Silvia mysteriously disappeared from his life, only to resurface as the wife of a wealthy Italian industrialist. Devastated, Matt buried himself in work, first in Africa, later in Boston and New York, where he married a childhood friend and became the top specialist in his field. Can he save his doomed lost love? Will they have a second chance at happiness? Segal handles this hackneyed yet entertaining plot with a light touch, adding a classical music subtext (Matthew is also a gifted pianist) to flesh out the fast-paced story. To say the least, the novel lacks the emotional intensity of the grand Italian opera scores reduced to a Muzak-like echo in these pages, and it's hard to care about any love affair involving Segal's smug protagonisteven one that nearly destroys his marriage. Nevertheless, the graying boomers who first made Segal a hit are likely to take whatever he dishes out, as he proves once again that Only Love means never having to say you're sorry.
Library Journal
John Rubinstein adroitly handles the accents and cultural flair of this typically Segal tale of romance, music, intelligent characters, and impending loss. Matthew Hiller, a brilliant medical geneticist, is approached by the husband of a dying woman begging him to save her life. Of course, this takes Matt back into a once impassioned and unresolved love. Much of this is told in flashbackfrom Paris and Venice to Africa and New Yorkbuilding the emotional ties between the doctor and his patient Silvia. This provides a challenge for the reader. However, a particular benefit to audio over print here is the Brahms piano and cello duet that helps the ending resonate for the listener. Announced as the subject of a 1998 Hallmark Hall of Fame miniseries, this will ensure a definite new mass-market market for this audiobook.Joyce Kessel, Villa Maria Coll., Buffalo, N.Y.
Kirkus Reviews
How can the author of a bombshell like 1970's Love Story follow up with such a long succession of dramatic duds (Prizes, 1995, etc.)? Readers are likely to occupy their minds with this question while leafing through the forgettable life and loves of Dr. Matthew Hiller, genetic engineer extraordinaire. With an alcoholic lit-professor father and a workaholic mother, young Matthew knew he was blessed to possess a talent as a pianist strong enough that one day it will carry him away from Dearborn, Michigan, forever. In college, he majors in music but also pursues an interest in medicine while carrying on a benign but creative friendship with a pretty cellist named Evie. After graduation, Evie marries her master-class instructor, and Matthew opts for med school, following up with a stint tending victims of Ethiopia's famine. There, he meets and falls hard for fellow doctor Silvia Dalessandro, an Italian super-heiress using this altruistic jaunt to escape a scheduled marriage to wealthy family friend Nico Rinaldi. Matthew and Silvia shack up together, but when Matthew is nearly killed by natives, Silvia agrees to marry Nico right away if he'll airlift Matthew to a Swiss hospital. Thus Matthew hangs on to his life but loses Silvia and—he realizes soon enough—his ability to play the piano. Heartbroken, he buries himself in research studies at Harvard, soon becoming the world's expert at destroying brain tumors through genetic engineering. Moving to New York to continue his work, Matthew rediscovers Evie (now divorced with two daughters), marries her, and lives happily until, lo and behold, Silvia appears at his office door with the biggest brain tumor of all. Will Matthewresist Silvia's fatal attraction, holding onto the family happiness he's found with Evie? Segal's brisk, oddly passionless prose does little to motivate the reader to care.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781568955209
Publisher:
Cengage Gale
Publication date:
01/01/1998
Series:
COMPASS Press Large Print Book Series

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Only Love 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I finished the movie, I ordered the book online within seconds. The passionate love story was amazing. Although, the ending disappointed me and made me very upset while reading the book I just made up my own fairtale ending, though life isn't always like that and I believe that's the point Segal wanted to make.
Guest More than 1 year ago
only love is one of he best books i read and the first romantic one, this book that not only made me find my passions for reading but it also took me into this whole new world.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I felt that this book was not only romantic, but realistic. Being a musician myself, i could feel his connection with the piano and how music touches people's lives. I loved how the book was not completely focused on the love story, but could take time to describe his experiences abroad and in medicine. The author was wonderful at making it seem like he was retelling his own life, and the language was believable. The fact that it was written in first person from a man's point of view also made it appealing. The ending, though diasappointing, made it perfect. It wouldn't have been good written any other way. I must say he did build it up to the end a bit too much. I can't wait to read another book by this author!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although some people were not impressed with this book, I really enjoyed it. I read it in two days, and couldn't put it down. Some poeple were disappoited by the end of the story, but I wasn't; Maybe I am just naive, but I really believed that Evie was Dr. Hiller's real 'only love'. He seemed happy with both women, but with Evie he could have a normal family and life, and they could really relate to eachother. I thought that this book was great. The plot was not too complex or confusing for me, just becuase I am used to reading books with such flashback tools (I think flashback is a good way to tell a story because it relates past to present and can sometimes foreshadow events to come). I found this book gripping and enjoyable, but of course, not as wonderful as LOVE STORY.