Only the Names Remain: The Cherokees and The Trail of Tears

Only the Names Remain: The Cherokees and The Trail of Tears

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by Alex W. Bealer, Kristina Rodanas
     
 

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From 1837 to 1838, thousands of Cherokee Indians were marched from their homelands in Georgia to exile in Arkansas by the same white men they has once befriended. The Cherokees journeyed through bitter cold and blazing heat, with little food or water. One out of every four died —- and with them died a culture that had existed for hundreds of years, a

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Overview

From 1837 to 1838, thousands of Cherokee Indians were marched from their homelands in Georgia to exile in Arkansas by the same white men they has once befriended. The Cherokees journeyed through bitter cold and blazing heat, with little food or water. One out of every four died —- and with them died a culture that had existed for hundreds of years, a civilization that had existed for hundred of years, a civilization that had embraced the white man's ways only to perish through his betrayal. Today, only the names remain of this once great nation.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Karen Saxe
Bealer originally wrote this story as a television documentary, which won an Associated Press Award. It tells of the exile of the Cherokee people from their homeland in the Appalachian region of Georgia. The Cherokees had lived there for almost a thousand years, had developed a great civilization, and had adapted well to the influx of Europeans and their customs. There was, of course, antagonism, and eventually they were forced off their land during the unfriendly presidency of Andrew Jackson. They were removed to the west, and most walked the thousand or so miles to their 'new home.' This journey is now known as the Trail of Tears and only three in four made it alive. Readers will learn about the Cherokee nation-their language, government and social customs-before the arrival of Europeans. The political tensions which ultimately led to the exile, and the journey itself are then discussed. This telling of this tragic part of US history is informative and engaging. The reader is, however, left wondering about what has since happened to these people. 1996 (orig.
Kirkus Reviews
Only The Names Remain (, paper; April 1996; 76 pp.; 0-316-08518-9, paper 0-316-08519-7): This history of the Cherokees in Georgia, originally published in 1972 and textually unrevised here, remains elegantly elegiac, bringing both clarity and immediacy to a complicated story. The book concisely covers the period from centuries before the arrival of the first white man in 1540, to the removal of most traces of the Cherokee Nation from Georgia after 1837, through the Trail of Tears, a journey that took one life in four among those who attempted it. This edition is newly embellished by Rodanas's black-and-white drawings, which soberly present Cherokee artifacts in full pages preceding each brief chapter and make this slender work even more accessible and vital to the chapter-book crowd than it was originally.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316085199
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
04/28/1996
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
80
Sales rank:
259,437
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.37(h) x 0.25(d)
Lexile:
1050L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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