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Oodles of Noodles
     

Oodles of Noodles

by Diana Hendry, Sarah Massini (Illustrator)
 
Ava & Ben's mom has a new pasta-making machine which means they can enjoy noodles every which way, but the machine seems to have a mind of its own & it starts working all by itself, cranking out oodles of noodles until the whole house becomes engulfed & spills out into the street. Can Ava & Ben stop the mischievous pasta maker?

Overview

Ava & Ben's mom has a new pasta-making machine which means they can enjoy noodles every which way, but the machine seems to have a mind of its own & it starts working all by itself, cranking out oodles of noodles until the whole house becomes engulfed & spills out into the street. Can Ava & Ben stop the mischievous pasta maker?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Although Ava and Ben prefer burgers and fries, their mother is thrilled to receive a pasta-making machine on her birthday. Mrs. Mungo gets right to work, rolling the pasta through the machine, eager for the noodles. But then the machine begins to work by itself. Soon it has wrapped her up in noodles. In scenes reminiscent of Strega Nona and her pasta pot, the noodles soon roll out of the house and down the street. Everyone seems delighted, but when the noodles reach the school, Ben and Ava realize that their mother needs them. Not only are the streets crowded with noodles; their mother is buried in them. And all she had said was, "Oodles of noodles." When Ben suggests they say that backward, the machine finally stops. And mother agrees to burgers and fries for lunch. Massini paints lighthearted scenes filled with action, bordering on cartoons. Even the machine has a personality, with knobs for eyes and a switch for expressive teeth. When those noodles keep flowing from the extruder, the scenes get increasingly visually exciting, comically so as the pasta tries to inundate everything. The text adds a variety of typefaces to add to the fun. The end pages show the evolution of the story; those in front have Ben and Ava's plates full of noodles while in back they have photo-realistic burgers and fries. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2

In the traditional tale of "The Magic Porridge Pot," a kind old woman teaches a young girl the magic words to utter to start and stop an enchanted pot providing food. Hendry's story is more or less the same, but the magic is not explained. Mrs. Mungo receives a pasta-making machine for her birthday and is thrilled at the prospect of making noodles. Her children prefer burgers and fries, but their mom perseveres. While they are at school, she starts up her gift, predicting, "I'll soon have oodles of noodles." It is then that the contraption suddenly begins its nonstop production. Noodles wrap around the woman's body, fill the house, and slither down the streets, all the way to the children's school. Somehow, they sense that their mother needs them and they run home just in time to find her "totally noodled." Ben, inexplicably, knows that a magic phrase will stop the machine and comes up with the right one. Massini's eye-catching full-spread illustrations are reminiscent of art in the 1960s and are somewhat humorous. However, some children may find a few of the pictures of the machine a bit menacing. All in all, by not informing readers/listeners of the magical background, the story feels as though something is missing. A recent, more complete version of the tale can be found in Hugh Lupton's The Story Tree (Barefoot, 2001).-Mary N. Oluonye, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781589250758
Publisher:
ME Media, LLC
Publication date:
02/01/2008
Series:
Tiger Tales Ser.
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

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