×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Open Boat
     

The Open Boat

3.2 4
by Stephen Crane
 

See All Formats & Editions

Though best known for The Red Badge of Courage, his classic novel of men at war, in his tragically brief life and career Stephen Crane produced a wealth of stories—among them "The Monster," "The Upturned Face," "The Open Boat," and the title story—that stand among the most acclaimed and enduring in the history of American fiction. This superb

Overview

Though best known for The Red Badge of Courage, his classic novel of men at war, in his tragically brief life and career Stephen Crane produced a wealth of stories—among them "The Monster," "The Upturned Face," "The Open Boat," and the title story—that stand among the most acclaimed and enduring in the history of American fiction. This superb volume collects stories of unique power and variety in which impressionistic, hallucinatory, and realistic situations alike are brilliantly conveyed through the cold, sometimes brutal irony of Crane's narrative voice.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061915857
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/28/2009
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
100
File size:
105 KB

Meet the Author

Stephen Crane was born in Newark, New Jersey, in 1871. He died in Germany on June 5, 1900.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Open Boat 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
TulaneGirl More than 1 year ago
Having absolutely adored The Red Badge of Courage, I had higher hopes for this short story. It's the story of four shipwrecked me struggling to survive out at sea. They are tired, hungry, and desperate. They see land and believe they see people on the shore. They have to make the decision of when to start trying to swim to shore - on the one hand the boat they're in is not strong enough to keep them afloat much longer, but the longer they have to swim, the less likely they'll reach their destination. My favorite part of the story is the railing at fate. They remain optimist only by rationalizing that fate would have let them drown days ago if she meant to kill them. It keeps them focused on rescuing themselves. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Isn't it strange when the freshest, most intelligent, piece of literature you read is something that was written a hundred years ago? Well, that was definitely the case in Crane's compact description of four men struggling to outlast a horrific sea gale in a life raft smaller than a 'bathtub.' Even though the story does not delve too deeply into the relationships (or pysches) of the four men - that is, there is little dramatic tension - the story is simply a wonderfully-told tale of survival - the adventures of men against the elements. The reader is kept guessing until the final page who will survive. Morevoer, the reader is also left wanting to read more Crane. Maybe, 'The Red Badge of Courage' is worth reading after all.