Open Government: Collaboration, Transparency, and Participation in Practice [NOOK Book]

Overview

In a world where web services can make real-time data accessible to anyone, how can the government leverage this openness to improve its operations and increase citizen participation and awareness? Through a collection of essays and case studies, leading visionaries and practitioners both inside and outside of government share their ideas on how to achieve and direct this ...

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Open Government: Collaboration, Transparency, and Participation in Practice

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Overview

In a world where web services can make real-time data accessible to anyone, how can the government leverage this openness to improve its operations and increase citizen participation and awareness? Through a collection of essays and case studies, leading visionaries and practitioners both inside and outside of government share their ideas on how to achieve and direct this emerging world of online collaboration, transparency, and participation.

Contributions and topics include:

  • Beth Simone Noveck, U.S. Deputy Chief Technology Officer for open government, "The Single Point of Failure"
  • Jerry Brito, senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, "All Your Data Are Belong to Us: Liberating Government Data"
  • Aaron Swartz, cofounder of reddit.com, OpenLibrary.org, and BoldProgressives.org, "When Is Transparency Useful?"
  • Ellen S. Miller, executive director of the Sunlight Foundation, "Disrupting Washington's Golden Rule"
  • Carl Malamud, founder of Public.Resource.Org, "By the People"
  • Douglas Schuler, president of the Public Sphere Project, "Online Deliberation and Civic Intelligence"
  • Howard Dierking, program manager on Microsoft's MSDN and TechNet Web platform team, "Engineering Good Government"
  • Matthew Burton, Web entrepreneur and former intelligence analyst at the Defense Intelligence Agency, "A Peace Corps for Programmers"
  • Gary D. Bass and Sean Moulton, OMB Watch, "Bringing the Web 2.0 Revolution to Government"
  • Tim O'Reilly, founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media, "Defining Government 2.0: Lessons Learned from the Success of Computer Platforms"

Open Government editors:


Daniel Lathrop is a former investigative projects reporter with the Seattle Post Intelligencer who's covered politics in Washington state, Iowa, Florida, and Washington D.C. He's a specialist in campaign finance and "computer-assisted reporting" -- the practice of using data analysis to report the news.


Laurel Ruma is the Gov 2.0 Evangelist at O'Reilly Media. She is also co-chair for the Gov 2.0 Expo.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
We’re living in a world characterized by exponential change. Most government organizations weren’t built for this world. The movement from closed to open is one of the most important ways governments can adapt to faster change. Open Government offers insight on how to get from here to there. It should be required reading for anyone who cares about the future of the public sector.

— William D. Eggers, Author of If We Can Put a Man on the Moon: Getting Big Things Done in Government and Government 2.0

Craig Newmark
Government is becoming more responsive and effective due to the Open Government movement. This book is written by the people, and for the people, who are interested in making Open Government happen.

— Craig Newmark, Founder of Craigslist

Andrew Hoppin
Open Government is a comprehensive compendium of the who, what, how, and why of the emergent national "Gov 2.0" movement; it's a must-read for all who care about transparent, efficient, and participatory government, which, by definition, should equate to each and every one of us in our capacity as citizens and voters.

— Andrew Hoppin, CIO, New York State Senate

William D. Eggers
We’re living in a world characterized by exponential change. Most government organizations weren’t built for this world. The movement from closed to open is one of the most important ways governments can adapt to faster change. Open Government offers insight on how to get from here to there. It should be required reading for anyone who cares about the future of the public sector.

— William D. Eggers, Author of If We Can Put a Man on the Moon: Getting Big Things Done in Government and Government 2.0

Lawrence Lessig
Open government is one critical part in making happen what some may think impossible: a government that actually works.

— Lawrence Lessig, director of the Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics and professor of law at Harvard Law School

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781449388805
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/8/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 432
  • File size: 9 MB

Meet the Author

Daniel Lathrop is a former investigative projects reporter with the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. He has covered politics in Washington state, Iowa, Florida and Washington D.C. He was a senior researcher on the New York Times bestselling "The Buying of the President 2004" by Charles Lewis. He is a specialist in campaign finance and "computer assisted reporting," the practice of using data analysis to report the news. He writes code in Perl, Python and PHP. He was the primary architect of the data for the Center for Public Integrity's successful Lobbywatch project, which provided the first truly searchable online database of federal lobbying available to the general public. He supervised the data team that developed CPI's Power Trips investigation of Congressional junkets.

Laurel Ruma is the Gov 2.0 Evangelist at O'Reilly Media. She is the co-chair for the Gov 2.0 Expo. Laurel joined the company in 2005 after being an editor at various IT research/consulting firms in the Boston area. Laurel went to Union College and is a photographer and homebrewer.

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Table of Contents

Foreword Don Tapscott Tapscott, Don

1 A Peace Corps for Programmers Matthew Burton Burton, Matthew 1

2 Government as a Platform Tim O'Reilly O'Reilly, Tim 11

3 By the People Carl Malamud Malamud, Carl 41

4 The Single Point of Failure Beth Simone Noveck Noveck, Beth Simone 49

5 Engineering Good Government Howard Dierking Dierking, Howard 71

6 Enabling Innovation for Civic Engagement David G. Robinson Robinson, David G. Harlan Yu Yu, Harlan Edward W. Felten Felten, Edward W. 83

7 Online Deliberation and Civic Intelligence Douglas Schuler Schuler, Douglas 91

8 Open Government and Open Society Archon Fung Fung, Archon David Well Well, David 105

9 "You Can Be the Eyes and Ears": Barack Obama and the Wisdom of Crowds Micah L. Sifry Sifry, Micah L. 115

10 Two-Way Street: Government With the People Mark Drapeau Drapeau, Mark 123

11 Citizens' View of Open Government Brian Reich Reich, Brian 131

12 After the Collapse: Open Government and the Future of Civil Service David Eaves Eaves, David 139

13 Democracy, Under Everything Sarah Schacht Schacht, Sarah 153

14 Emergent Democracy Charles Armstrong Armstrong, Charles 167

15 Case Study: Tweet Congress Wynn Netherland Netherland, Wynn Chris McCroskey McCroskey, Chris 177

16 Entrepreneurial Insurgency: Republicans Connect With the American People Nick Schaper Schaper, Nick 183

17 Disrupting Washington's Golden Rule Ellen S. Miller Miller, Ellen S. 193

18 Case Study: GovtTack.US Joshua Tauberer Tauberer, Joshua 201

19 Case Study: Followthemoney.Org Edwin Bender Bender, Edwin 213

20 Case Study: Maplight.Org Daniel Newman Newman, Daniel 223

21 Going 2.0: Why Opensecrets.OrgOpted for Full Frontal Data Sharing Sheila Krumholz Krumholz, Sheila 233

22 All Your Data are Belong to US: Liberating Government Data Jerry Brito Brito, Jerry 241

23 Case Study: Many Eyes Fernanda Viegas Viegas, Fernanda Martin Wattenberg Wattenberg, Martin 249

24 My Data Can't Tell You That Bill Allison Allison, Bill 257

25 When is Transparency Useful? Aaron Swartz Swartz, Aaron 267

26 Transparency Inside Out Tim Koelkebeck Koelkebeck, Tim 273

27 Bringing the Web 2.0 Revolution to Government Gary D. Bass Bass, Gary D. Sean Moulton Moulton, Sean 289

28 Toads on the Road to Open Government Data Bill Schrier Schrier, Bill 305

29 Open Government: The Privacy Imperative Jeff Jonas Jonas, Jeff Jim Harper Harper, Jim 315

30 Freedom of Information Acts: Promises and Realities Brant Houston Houston, Brant 327

31 Gov[actual symbol not reproducible]media[actual symbol not reproducible]people Dan Gillmor Gillmor, Dan 337

32 Open Source Software for Open Government Agencies Carlo Daffara Daffara, Carlo Jesus M. Gonzalez-Barahona Gonzalez-Barahona, Jesus M. 345

33 Why Open Digital Standards Matter in Government Marco Floretti Floretti, Marco 363

34 Case Study: Utah.Gov David Fletcher Fletcher, David 375

Memo From President Obama on Transparency and Open Government 389

Index 391

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 16, 2010

    TRANSPARENCY IN GOVERNMENT: IS IT REAL??

    Do you want to access the documents and proceedings of government? If you do, then this book is for you! Authors Daniel Lathrop and Laurel Ruma, have done an outstanding job of writing a book that will help you scrutinize and participate in government, by introducing you to 34 leading visionaries, thinkers, and practitioners:

    Matthew Burton, begins by proposing anew project to recruit top technologies into government temporarily and harness their knowledge to transform the way government information technology operates. Next, Tim O'Reilly examines how the philosophy of the open Web applies to transforming the relationships between citizens and government. Carl Malamud continues by addressing the third wave of government transformation. Then, Beth Simone Noveck tackles the issue of closed decision making and open deliberation. Next, Howard Dierking explores applying software design patterns to government. Then, Douglas Schuler proposes a new model for online discussion and decision making, molded on the famous Robert 's Rules of Order. Micah L. Sifry continues by looking at the open government promises of the Obama administration and places it in the context of broader notions that underlie the philosophy of open source technology and Web 2.0. Mark Drapeau then examines how and why those who favor open government need to provide outside pressure if those inside government who desire change are able to make it happen. Next, Brian Reich sketches out what reforms must achieve for regular citizens in order to be effective. David Eaves continues by taking a look at open government and the civil service and argues for experimentation and accepting the inevitable technological shift that is upon government. Charles Armstrong then outlines a new kind of digital democracy in which decisions bubble up from citizens rather than coming down from e-leaders. Next, Nick Schaper describes the social media strategy the Republican minority in the U.S. House uses to outfox the Democrats who control the chamber. Ellen S. Miller continues by explaining why radical transparency in government will act as a counterweight to the influence of monied interests in shaping government policy. Finally, David Fletcher takes a tour through the most transparent state in the United States and explores the history; as well as, the future of Utah.

    This most excellent book shows you why government needs to adopt open standards in its technology that eschew the lock-in from vendor-specific technologies! More importantly, if you read this book from cover to cover, you'll discover that government must adopt open source software in order to achieve true open government, and that doing so has many social, societal, and economic benefits..

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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