Opening Doors: The Early Netherlandish Triptych Reinterpreted

Overview

Opening Doors is the first book of its kind: a comprehensive study of the emergence and evolution of the Netherlandish triptych from the early fifteenth through the early seventeenth centuries. The modern term “triptych” did not exist during the period Lynn Jacobs discusses. Rather, contemporary French, Dutch, and Latin documents employ a very telling description—they call the triptych a “painting with doors.” Using this term as her springboard, Jacobs considers its implications for the structure and meaning of ...

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Overview

Opening Doors is the first book of its kind: a comprehensive study of the emergence and evolution of the Netherlandish triptych from the early fifteenth through the early seventeenth centuries. The modern term “triptych” did not exist during the period Lynn Jacobs discusses. Rather, contemporary French, Dutch, and Latin documents employ a very telling description—they call the triptych a “painting with doors.” Using this term as her springboard, Jacobs considers its implications for the structure and meaning of the triptych. The fundamental nature of the format created doors that established thresholds, boundaries, and interconnections between physical parts of the triptych—the center and wings, the interior and the exterior—and between types of meaning, the sacred and the earthly, different narrative moments, different spaces, different levels of status, and, ultimately, different worlds. Moving chronologically from early triptychs such as Campin’s Mérode Triptych and Van Eyck’s Dresden Triptych to sixteenth-century works by Bosch, and closing with a discussion of Rubens, Jacobs considers how artists negotiated the idea of the threshold. From her analysis of Campin’s ambiguous divisions between the space represented across the panels, to Van der Weyden’s invention of the “arch motif” that organized relations between the viewer and the painting, to Van der Goes’s complex hierarchical structures, to Bosch’s unprecedentedly unified spaces, Jacobs shows us how Netherlandish artists’ approach to the format changed and evolved, culminating in the early seventeenth century with Rubens’s great Antwerp altarpieces.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780271048406
  • Publisher: Penn State University Press
  • Publication date: 12/15/2011
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Pages: 328
  • Sales rank: 1,408,841
  • Product dimensions: 10.80 (w) x 9.80 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Lynn F. Jacobs is Professor of Art at the University of Arkansas.

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Table of Contents

Contents

List of Illustrations

Acknowledgments

Introduction: The Triptych as a “Painting with Doors”

Part I: Origins and the First Half of the Fifteenth Century

1 The Emergence of the Early Netherlandish Triptych I: Robert Campin (and His Associates)

2 The Emergence of the Early Netherlandish Triptych II: Jan van Eyck

Part II: The Second Half of the Fifteenth Century

3 The Triptych Reformulated: Rogier van der Weyden

4 The Triptych Popularized: Painters of the Second Half of the Fifteenth Century

5 The Triptych Unified: Memling, David, and Later Fifteenth-Century Painters in Bruges

Part III: The Sixteenth Century and Beyond

6 The World Triptych: Hieronymus Bosch

7 The Triptych in the Age of the Renaissance and the Reformation

8 Coda: The Triptych in the Age of Rubens

Notes

Bibliography

Index

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