Opening the Gates of Eighteenth-Century Montréal

Overview

Based on a fifteen-year study of manuscript sources from Europe and North America,
Opening the Gates of Eighteenth-Century Montréal focuses on the interrelationships of three key elements of Montréal's urban form: its fortifications; the ownership, distribution, and use of property within its walls; and the nature of its buildings.The first section of the book,
Fortifications, traces Montréal's development as one of the most important military ...

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Overview

Based on a fifteen-year study of manuscript sources from Europe and North America,
Opening the Gates of Eighteenth-Century Montréal focuses on the interrelationships of three key elements of Montréal's urban form: its fortifications; the ownership, distribution, and use of property within its walls; and the nature of its buildings.The first section of the book,
Fortifications, traces Montréal's development as one of the most important military and commercial centers of the French colonial network arching from Louisbourg to the Great Lakes and down the Lake
Champlain and Ohio corridors. It also discusses the related development of the town's fortifications.Town, the second section, examines how Montréal's diversifying economic activities -
many connected with the building, maintenance, and supply of inland military posts -influenced land use and building within the walls.The last section, Buildings, focuses on the urban house,
Montréal's principal building type in the eighteenth-century, examining it in its material and social environments: morphology of town and fortifications, distribution of institutional buildings,
and formative legal traditions -- metropolitan French above all, but later also British and
American. The demolition of the walls (1801-1817) that had defined the town blurred town and suburb and augured a new urban form.

The MIT Press

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Phyllis Lambert is founder and director of the Canadian Centre for Architecture.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements 11
Introduction 13
I Fortifications
The Fortifications of Montreal 19
Montreal: Entrepot and Military Logistics Centre 31
II Town
Settlement, Commerce, and the Local Economy 45
Reconstructing the Eighteenth-Century Town 55
III Buildings
The House and Its Environment 69
Removing the Fortifications: Toward a New Urban Form 79
Chronology 89
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