Operating System Concepts / Edition 8

Operating System Concepts / Edition 8

3.7 6
by Abraham Silberschatz, Peter B. Galvin, Greg Gagne
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1118112733

ISBN-13: 9781118112731

Pub. Date: 07/05/2011

Publisher: Wiley

Operating System Concepts continues to provide a solid theoretical foundation for understanding operating systems. The 8th Edition Update includes more coverage of the most current topics in the rapidly changing fields of operating systems and networking, including open-source operating systems. The use of simulators and operating system emulators

Overview

Operating System Concepts continues to provide a solid theoretical foundation for understanding operating systems. The 8th Edition Update includes more coverage of the most current topics in the rapidly changing fields of operating systems and networking, including open-source operating systems. The use of simulators and operating system emulators is incorporated to allow operating system operation demonstrations and full programming projects. The text also includes improved conceptual coverage and additional content to bridge the gap between concepts and actual implementations. New end-of-chapter problems, exercises, review questions, and programming exercises help to further reinforce important concepts, while WileyPLUS continues to motivate students and offer comprehensive support for the material in an interactive format.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781118112731
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
07/05/2011
Edition description:
8th, Update Edition
Pages:
972
Product dimensions:
7.20(w) x 10.10(h) x 1.60(d)

Table of Contents

PART ONE OVERVIEW
Chapter 1 Introduction

Chapter 2 Operating-System Structures

PART TWO PROCESS MANAGEMENT
Chapter 3 Processes

Chapter 4 Threads

Chapter 5 CPU Scheduling

Chapter 6 Process Synchronization

Chapter 7 Deadlocks

PART THREE MEMORY MANAGEMENT
Chapter 8 Main Memory

Chapter 9 Virtual Memory

Chapter 10 File-System Interface

Chapter 11 File-System Implementation

Chapter 12 Mass-Storage Structure

Chapter 13 I/O Systems

PART FIVE PROTECTION AND SECURITY
Chapter 14 Protection

Chapter 15 Security

PART SIX DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS
Chapter 16 Distributed System Structures

Chapter 17 Distributed File Systems

Chapter 18 Distributed Coordination

PART SEVEN SPECIAL -PURPOSE SYSTEMS
Chapter 19 Real-Time Systems

Chapter 20 Multimedia Systems

PART EIGHT CASE STUDIES
Chapter 21 The Linux System

Chapter 22 Windows 7®

Chapter 23 Influential Operating Systems

PART NINE APPENDICES
Appendix A BSD UNIX (contents online)

Appendix B The Mach System (contents online)

Appendix C Windows 2000 (contents online)

Bibliography Credits Index

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Operating System Concepts 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Boudville More than 1 year ago
The authors provide a quite exhaustive and up to date [circa 2011] explanation of the main operating systems in deployment. The level of the narrative is suited for an undergraduate senior level or graduate level class in computing. The book is well reinforced by an integration with the online Wiley Plus website. On this you can get source code appropriate to each chapter, as well as solutions to the practice exercises. This frees up the text from having to provide space to list the source code or answers, which you often see in other texts. The chapters are configured with 2 sets of exercises; the practice ones being the first set and simpler. This format lets you, if you are the instructor for a college course, assign the second set as homework. Also, the website offers more problems and answers to those. For the instructor or dedicated student, this is a value added bonus. Plus the website has another nifty feature - a simulator of an operating system. Instructors who have been in this field long enough might have seen cases where a computer course might have had this, but implemented locally on that department's machines, so that students had something tangible they could run their assembly code on. While this is vital, the problem was the effort needed in writing that simulator. It is a great timesaver to have it here as the book's companion. Overall, the pedagogy strikes a good balance between the traditional book-only mode of instruction and going the much ballyhooed pure DVD or web or e-book reader approach. Chapter 8 on the main memory is a well written account of how a user program goes from source code to run time. It explains the key ideas of the functioning of a memory management unit and logical and physical addresses. Related to this are static and dynamic loading, where the latter uses dynamically linked libraries. If you are a student who has probably already used computers, you have heard these terms before. But the book now gives you a firm grasp on what these actually mean. Chapters 10 and 11 on the file system should be read as one logical entity. These offer the idea that at the level of the operating system, it operates on user data at the level of files. That file management is the central duty of any operating system, from the user's standpoint. The book also has a nice discussion of the notorious Morris Internet worm, which was unleashed in 1988 on Vaxes and Suns. I remember it quite well when I was at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. There was briefly some anxious concern about a malign penetration of the Lab, but the infected machines were quickly fixed and no data was corrupted or copied over the network. The global extent of the worm and the lack of damage to the filesystems now seems quaint compared to the more virulent malware in circulation on an Internet of computers some 3 or 4 orders of magnitude larger. By the way, there is relatively little [effectively none] discussion about the Internet Protocol, either in its 32 bit v4 or 128 bit v6 versions. This reflects the fact that even today the concepts and implementations of an operating system are largely independent of and orthogonal to the IP. While the book goes into networks of machines, the focus is clearly on how single machines work. And when there are indeed discussions of higher level network protocols, notably the seminal Network File Systems, these require little or no low level forays into IP details.
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afghanistan More than 1 year ago
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