The Operators: The Wild and Terrifying Inside Story of America's War in Afghanistan

( 25 )

Overview

From the author of The Last Magazine, a shocking behind-the-scenes portrait of our military commanders, their high-stake maneuvers, and the politcal firestorm that shook the United States.

In the shadow of the hunt for Bin Laden and the United States’ involvement in the Middle East, General Stanley McChrystal, the commanding general of international and U.S. forces in Afghanistan, was living large. His loyal staff liked to call him a “rock star.” During a spring 2010 trip, ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (2) from $18.02   
  • Used (2) from $18.02   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$18.02
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(81)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Very Good
London 2012 Trade paperback Very Good. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains ... undamaged. Trade paperback (UK). 432 p. Illustrations. *****PLEASE NOTE: This item is shipping from an authorized seller in Europe. In the event that a return is necessary, you will be able to return your item within the US. To learn more about our European sellers and policies see the BookQuest FAQ section***** Read more Show Less

Ships from: Goring-By-Sea, United Kingdom

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$19.04
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(21)

Condition: Good
02/23/2012 Paperback Good **SHIPPED FROM UK** We believe you will be completely satisfied with our quick and reliable service. All orders are dispatched as swiftly as possible! ... Buy with confidence! *****PLEASE NOTE: This item is shipping from an authorized seller in Europe. In the event that a return is necessary, you will be able to return your item within the US. To learn more about our European sellers and policies see the BookQuest FAQ section***** Read more Show Less

Ships from: London, United Kingdom

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
The Operators: The Wild and Terrifying Inside Story of America's War in Afghanistan

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$13.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

From the author of The Last Magazine, a shocking behind-the-scenes portrait of our military commanders, their high-stake maneuvers, and the politcal firestorm that shook the United States.

In the shadow of the hunt for Bin Laden and the United States’ involvement in the Middle East, General Stanley McChrystal, the commanding general of international and U.S. forces in Afghanistan, was living large. His loyal staff liked to call him a “rock star.” During a spring 2010 trip, journalist Michael Hastings looked on as McChrystal and his staff let off steam, partying and openly bashing the Obama administration. When Hastings’s article appeared in Rolling Stone, it set off a political firestorm: McChrystal was unceremoniously fired.

In The Operators, Hastings picks up where his Rolling Stone coup ended. From patrol missions in the Afghan hinterlands to senior military advisors’ late-night bull sessions to hotel bars where spies and expensive hookers participate in nation-building, Hastings presents a shocking behind-the-scenes portrait of what he fears is an unwinnable war.  Written in prose that is at once eye-opening and other times uncannily conversational, readers of No Easy Day will take to Hastings’ unyielding first-hand account of the Afghan War and its cast of players.   

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

In June 2010, journalist Michael Hastings broke the gathering media silence about the conflict in Afghanistan with his stunning Rolling Stone article "The Runaway General." This detailed-packed piece not only set off a storm of controversy; it eventually led to the resignation of General Stanley McChyrstal. In The Operators, Hastings explores the planning and conduct of this long-fought war. In exclusive, behind-the-scenes reportage from Afghanistan, Europe, the Middle East, and Washington, he probes beneath the surface of official statements and public platitudes. Certain to make its own headlines.

Publishers Weekly
Starred Review.

Hastings (I Lost My Love in Baghdad: A Modern War Story) recounts the events behind and beyond his award-winning 2010 Rolling Stone article "The Runaway General," which led to the resignation of General Stanley McChrystal and his replacement with General David Petraeus. Trailing McChrystal and his staff as they travel to Paris, Berlin, and Kabul, Hastings discovers how the nation's foremost "operators"-the special forces and other personnel on "the X...the spot on the satellite map where the action goes down"-regard the war as secondary to their loyalty to each other. Cavalier remarks about key figures and incidents ranging from the infamous cover-up of the cause of Pat Tillman's death to scenes with President Obama reveal the essential divide between military and civilian perspectives. Hastings brilliantly intertwines narratives, whether writing about the halls of Washington, war-torn Baghdad, or rudimentary lessons in counterinsurgency math, a system wherein killing two of ten results not in eight, but twenty insurgents. Hasting's first-class, engrossing reportage reveals unsettling yet human flaws behind one of recent history's most lionized military figures, and a war which purportedly began as a response to terrorism, but whose aims-in the author's estimation-remain ambiguous.
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

From the Publisher
"An impressive feat of journalism by a Washington outsider who seemed to know more about what was going on in Washington than most insiders did." —-The New York Times
Library Journal
Hastings seems to be just the man to tell us what's really happening in Afghanistan; his Rolling Stone article, "The Runaway General," created a storm that led to the resignation of Gen. Stanley McChrystal. Here he relies on exclusive reporting in Washington, DC, Europe, the Middle East, and, specifically, Afghanistan to clarify what is really happening in that country. I'm betting that this will generate lots of interest.
Kirkus Reviews
War correspondent Hastings vividly recounts his explosive 2010 Rolling Stone article that got Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal drummed out of Afghanistan. McChrystal's unchecked remarks caused his firing, but things might have gone down differently if the general had taken a lesson from Cameron Crowe's Almost Famous. It happened in the spring of 2010 during a European trip the general made to bolster sagging support for the war. Hastings was invited along. The premise of the movie--a promising band experiences their downfall after the Rolling Stone reporter they accept into their circle writes an unflattering (though accurate) story about them--perfectly mirrors the situation in which McChrystal and his entourage would become embroiled. Like Almost Famous, Hastings' astute war memoir is pitch-perfect in demonstrating the challenges that all diligent journalists face. If someone isn't actively working hard to shut you down, they're busy trying to co-opt you. In this case, a certified war hero and his hotshot staff were too confident in their ability to woo a puff piece out of a young writer. The author's frank discussion of these subtler forms of coercion, continuously employed to undermine accurate reporting, is undoubtedly courageous. According to Hastings, McChrystal and his highly accomplished cadre of elite military men operated in a bubble so thick, they foolishly believed they could mold not only a magazine profile to their liking, but also an entire country. As the situation in Afghanistan grows increasingly muddy, the author's disciplined adherence to solid journalistic practices and his acute eye for sharp scene setting makes much of the chaos comprehensible. Hastings has definitely taken up the traditional banner of the intrepid war correspondent, but he's simultaneously shot it through with iconoclastic holes; the effect is illuminating on many levels. An exciting and enlightening exposé of the war in Afghanistan, the dangers of concentrated power and the public's need to know.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781409144878
  • Publisher: Orion Publishing Group, Limited
  • Publication date: 2/28/2012

Table of Contents

Part I The Plan

1 Delta Bravo 3

2 It's Not Switzerland 6

3 Lady Gaga 12

4 "Intimidated by the Crowd" 18

5 Arc de Trimphe 24

6 "A Violent Act" 33

7 On the X 40

8 The A-Team 45

9 "Bite Me" 51

10 The Photo Op 55

11 Totally Shit-Faced 59

12 "Dead Silence" 67

13 The Horror, the Horror 72

14 We're Actually Losing 78

15 Petraeus Can't Do Afghanistan, and We Aren't Going to Get Bin Laden 85

16 The Elections, Part I 94

17 Texts to Berlin 100

18 The Elections, Part II 102

19 Team America Rolls the Ritz 108

20 On Principle 116

21 Spies Like Us 121

22 "I'm President. I Don't Give a Shit What They Say" 129

23 The Strategy 137

24 "Let Me Be Clear" 149

25 Worshipping the Gods of Beer 153

26 Who Is Stanley McChrystal? Part I, 1954-1976 158

27 "The Jerk in Green" 165

28 Who Is Stanley McChrystal? Part II, 1976-Present Day 171

29 Reality Checks In 176

Part II Interlude: Dubai 183

Part III Afghanistan

30 A Short History of a Horrible Idea 201

31 Bad Romance 210

32 President Karzai Has a Cold 226

33 An E-mail Exchange: Come Walk in Our Boots 232

34 A Boy Born in 1987 235

35 Where Is Israel Arroyo? 240

36 Ingram's House 254

37 An Army of None 267

38 In the Arena 276

39 "I Didn't Even Know We Were Fighting There" 284

40 The Concluding Converations with Duncan Boothby, General Petraeus Face-Plants in Congress, and the Story Breaks While I Watch American Helicopter Pilots Kill Insurgents 290

Part IV The Graceful Exit

41 "Very, Very Bad" 313

42 The Pentagon Investigates McChrystal 324

43 The Media-Military-Industrial Complex 328

44 I'd Rather Be Eating a Burger 331

45 Once Upon a Time in Kandahar 336

46 King David's War 344

47 "Tourism, Not Terrorism" 350

48 Petraeus Does Body Counts 354

49 The New Afghanistan 360

50 Joe Biden Is Right 368

Epilogue: Someday, This War's Gonna End 376

Source Notes 381

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 25 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 25 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2012

    Fantastic

    Among the real thinkers in the Army there is a motto that the subjects of this book failed to recognize as a truth: Arrogance does not equal competence.

    This author is a real patriot...he's exposed the Eisenhower wannabes for what they are and what they aren't.

    10 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 29, 2012

    Yes, We Should be Disturbed by the Afghan War and Its Leaders. Hastings Has the Experience to Tell Us Why

    If you want warm fuzzies about the powerful U.S. military and its exalted leaders, pass on this book. It's not for people who equate war with patriotism, security and heroic leadership. But it is fair, based on cobersationsI have had with current and retired military people.

    The military is its own universe, and Stanley McChrystal is the ultimate insider, not even knowing "what to do with civilians." Example: Hastings writes of McChrystal's contacting a respected author about his definitive book on the Vietnam War. The general asks the author what he (McChrystal) could learn from the author as he prepared to take the command in Afghanistan. The author replied that the U.S. should never have been in Vietnam. That was not was the general wanted to hear and proceeded with on-going, brutal attacks in the Helmand Province. An elite review team advised against even fighting there, where troops were being killed every four or five days.The momentum was there. Our forces would stay and fight. We now know, of course, that even the "great" Gen. David Petraeus did not use the word "win" after he took over the command from McChrystal. The Operators tells us why. It's well-researched - Hasting was there for the strategy and truth sessions - and it will be familiar to people who actually served.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2012

    Engaging, but it could be written better

    I'm enjoying reading this book, and it's engaging and interesting. However, I cringe when I read things like, "He texted me it." Just a little more attention to good editing could have gone a long way.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 5, 2012

    Eye Opener!

    I have to admit I could only read so much of this book at one time because I found the behavior of these generals and their subordinates so disgusting. THis was an informative account of the complete manipulation of what went on in Afganistan and how the American people have been lied to so the generals can "play war" at the expense of many American lives. Thank you, Michael Hastings, for again enlightening us! Keep up the great work!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2012

    Number 1from a Viet Nam Vet

    Afghanistan, what a waste of life (our soldiers & their civilans - could give a s... about their so called military)! Couple of Generals wanting their Combat Infantry badges, polliticans with no idea what the f... is going on, and civilian contractors raking in $,$$$,$$$'s at taxpayers' expense! Hastings, you are right on, thanks and keep hammering them. A must read if you give a s... about this country and our children and their children if they get to have any!!!

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2012

    The operators

    Michael Hastings introduces humor to a very morbid and moribund adventure of the US in Afghanistan. This is a must-read for anyone interested in the future of our country.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 7, 2012

    Amamzing

    If you read one book all year this is that book

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 4, 2013

    Incredibly smart and bravely devoid of the love fest propaganda

    Incredibly smart and bravely devoid of the love fest propaganda one finds in Broadwell's bio of Petraeus.  This is a must read.  Hastings is the man!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2012

    Very imformitive - you must read it !

    This book gives a close work to the inner workings of politics and the war-machine. One more reason we are not winning these wars, too much political power in the way.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2012

    !

    Revealing...

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2012

    Reads like a suspense novel

    Spare observations on the waste and futility of war. "The strategy is akin to digging a hole in the desert, then filling the hole with cash and dead bodies and calling it a victory."

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 2, 2014

    Unfettered access by a young Rolling Stone reporter to a war gen

    Unfettered access by a young Rolling Stone reporter to a war general’s inner circle - what could go wrong? General Stanley McChrystal received his answer after Hastings scribbled his now-infamous article which led to McChrystal’s forced retirement. That alone was quite an amazing story, but in The Operators, Hasting provided a personal and inside look into his time with the general and the rocky aftermath. Along the way, he documented his travels through Europe and Afghanistan with the general and his team, reporting on their boasting and free-wheeling behavior. Hastings spotlighted a harsh beam onto the war in Afghanistan and the policy-makers task to execute it. At times, his first-person, fly-on-the-wall style came off a bit self-serving, but on the same hand, the reporting was always equitable and top-notch. Hastings untimely death has stripped the world of any future investigations, a tragedy, but The Operators is a worthwhile legacy of his stellar reporting.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2013

    Naive, youthful account

    The condescending tone of the book is unappealing at best. Hastily written and self aggrandizing account of young man's interviews with military personnel

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2012

    I like it

    I like chicken too

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2012

    Not worth the money

    Found this to be a little to liberal for my taste not so sure i buy into all that he says it sure as heck was not worth the $$$ hes charging

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2012

    Don't read save your time and money

    Horrid bad bad bad

    0 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 25 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)