Optical System Design

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Overview

Optical devices are everywhere today, from complex medical instruments to common supermarket scanners and automatically opened doors. This book was written for scientists and engineers in all fields who need to understand the design and use of optical and optoelectronic instruments, ranging from simple to sophisticated. Drawing on 20 years of teaching experience in universities and industry, Allen Nussbaum presents a computer-based method for designing devices that work in the real world. Taking advantage of new advances in matrix theory and computer modeling, Nussbaum's modernizations replace old-fashioned algebraic methods, long tedious derivations, and dubious approximations. This book walks the reader step by step through the details of optical system design, right up to practical installation of the system in an end-user setting. The material was developed as a one-term course at the university level and has also served as the text for a two-day short course given to students in many industries.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
This textbook takes a modern approach to the subject of geometrical optics by focusing on the advances in the use of matrices and computer modeling. Topics include paraxial matrix optics, nonparaxial meridional optics, conic aspheric surfaces, chromatic aberrations, Fourier analysis and optics, light as a form of energy, and ray tracing and photometry. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780139010422
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference
  • Publication date: 12/9/1997
  • Pages: 203
  • Product dimensions: 7.22 (w) x 9.59 (h) x 0.87 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE: Preface

Why another book on geometrical optics when there are so many already available?

The principal reason is that the teaching of geometrical optics, both elementary and advanced, needs to be modernized.

Two recent developments have made this possible. The first is the ready availability of information on the use of matrices. Ray tracing can be made simple through the use of 2 x 2 matrices, a method developed many years ago in England independently by R. A. Sampson and by T. Smith.

Their ideas were made known by W. Brouwer in his published lecture notes, "Matrix Methods in Optical Instrument Design," W.A. Benjamin (1964). The second big change in optics education involves the use of personal computers; the programs given here will eliminate much of the complicated algebra in traditional courses. The amount of physics used is minimal: just Snell's law, Huygens' principle, and some wave theory. The emphasis is on geometry and the associated calculations. Another area that needed improvement in teaching is Fourier optics.

Here, unfortunately, there is no simplifying tool like matrices. Instead, it has become possible to eliminate many of the advanced topics in Fourier analysis and achieve a useful presentation again by taking advantage of the power of programming. It should also be pointed out that there are a moderate number of misconceptions about aberration theory in many of the well-known optics texts, and I have explained these in some detail.

It is my hope that this book will encourage the use of new ways to study advanced geometrical optics so that it can be an enjoyableand rewarding experience.

Allen Nussbaum Minneapolis, MN

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Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
1 Paraxial Matrix Optics 1
2 Nonparaxial Meridional Optics 49
3 Nonparaxial Skew Optics 71
4 Conic Aspheric Surfaces 87
5 More about Aberrations 103
6 Chromatic Aberrations 117
7 Wave Optics 123
8 Fourier Analysis 151
9 Fourier Optics 159
10 Light as a Form of Energy 177
Index 197
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Preface

PREFACE: Preface

Why another book on geometrical optics when there are so many already available?

The principal reason is that the teaching of geometrical optics, both elementary and advanced, needs to be modernized.

Two recent developments have made this possible. The first is the ready availability of information on the use of matrices. Ray tracing can be made simple through the use of 2 x 2 matrices, a method developed many years ago in England independently by R. A. Sampson and by T. Smith.

Their ideas were made known by W. Brouwer in his published lecture notes, "Matrix Methods in Optical Instrument Design," W.A. Benjamin (1964). The second big change in optics education involves the use of personal computers; the programs given here will eliminate much of the complicated algebra in traditional courses. The amount of physics used is minimal: just Snell's law, Huygens' principle, and some wave theory. The emphasis is on geometry and the associated calculations. Another area that needed improvement in teaching is Fourier optics.

Here, unfortunately, there is no simplifying tool like matrices. Instead, it has become possible to eliminate many of the advanced topics in Fourier analysis and achieve a useful presentation again by taking advantage of the power of programming. It should also be pointed out that there are a moderate number of misconceptions about aberration theory in many of the well-known optics texts, and I have explained these in some detail.

It is my hope that this book will encourage the use of new ways to study advanced geometrical optics so that it can be anenjoyableand rewarding experience.

Allen Nussbaum Minneapolis, MN

Read More Show Less

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