Oracle DBA SQL Quick Reference

Oracle DBA SQL Quick Reference

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by Charlie Russel, Robert Cordingley
     
 

  • The Oracle SQL every DBA needs—fast and easy!
  • Covers all the core day-to-day tasks DBAs are responsible for
  • Quick access to SQL commands, operators, functions, data dictionary views, and more
  • Includes dozens of easy-to-understand syntax diagrams

The fast, practical Oracle SQL reference for every Oracle DBA!

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Overview

  • The Oracle SQL every DBA needs—fast and easy!
  • Covers all the core day-to-day tasks DBAs are responsible for
  • Quick access to SQL commands, operators, functions, data dictionary views, and more
  • Includes dozens of easy-to-understand syntax diagrams

The fast, practical Oracle SQL reference for every Oracle DBA!

If you're a working Oracle DBA, here's the Oracle SQL reference you've been searching for—simple, straightforward, and incredibly easy to use! There's no faster way to discover the exact syntax you need...refresh your memory about that option you haven't used lately...find the name of that view you know exists...start using that new Oracle 9i feature you haven't tried yet. Keep it by your desk, near your server...wherever you need fast, reliable answers right this minute!
  • Covers Oracle SQL through Oracle9i Release 2
  • Clear, well-organized tables of operators, functions, format models, privileges, and reserved words
  • Complete command reference: syntax and options for every Oracle SQL command
  • Standard "railroad" syntax diagrams make it easy to write correct syntax
  • Handy listings of data dictionary views and dynamic performance tables

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780131403031
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
06/26/2003
Series:
Prentice Hall PTR Oracle Series
Pages:
560
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.06(h) x 1.01(d)

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Oracle DBA SQL Quick Reference 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Remember the early days of Oracle's products? Now we've reached the heights of Oracle 9i. How things are grown. The multiple table joins; the many obscure syntactical variants added by what are now centuries of person years of coding. Perhaps it is inevitable that any successful software will continually add refinements that increase its capabilities, but usually this is done at a concomitant loss of simplicity. Typically you as a database administrator will rarely use most features. But how to find the occasional rarity that you need, and have forgotten (or perhaps never knew)? By definition, the vendor's manuals are authoritative. But often these fall short in usability or pedagogy. (Oracle is by no means alone in this.) So here, Russel and Cordingley give you an independent, simple index into 9i. A quick perusal shows no index. But a second look shows that the entire book is really a graphical index into, and a refresher of, the command syntax. Like conventional indices, the book does not attempt to explain its entries. For example, on page 146, we see a graph for 'add hash substitution'. They assume you know what this means, but that you need a quick reminder of HOW to invoke it. Given that you have the database and its online help accessible (otherwise why would you need this book?), this is a fair assumption. Clearly, you can consult the online or hardcopy documentation for more information. The stress in the book is on simplicity. There is a little irony here. A database is a means whereby you can store data in a silo and easily get summaries and subsets ('views') of it. When you strip away the technical jargon, every database package aspires to this. If you regard the commands and capabilities of a database as data (or metadata), then you cannot usually change these. But how do you get summaries and views of THIS data? That is what the vendor's online help and documentation is all about. The irony about this book is not that it was written, but that it was not written by Oracle. The vendor's raison d'etre is to provide tools for access to information. But here, others have seen a need to write another tool to get at the vendor's own data.