Oracle8i for Linux Starter Kit (Book/CD-ROM Package)

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Oracle8i for Linux Starter Kit gives you everything you need to get started using Oracle8i on the Linux platform. This Starter Kit is a complete collection of tutorials and step-by-step guidelines that provides you with the key concepts and hands-on experience necessary to install and deploy Oracle8i on Linux. You'll learn to configure, administer, and tune a database system and master the fundamental skills required to build SQL, PL/SQL, and Java applications that interact with...
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Overview

Oracle8i for Linux Starter Kit gives you everything you need to get started using Oracle8i on the Linux platform. This Starter Kit is a complete collection of tutorials and step-by-step guidelines that provides you with the key concepts and hands-on experience necessary to install and deploy Oracle8i on Linux. You'll learn to configure, administer, and tune a database system and master the fundamental skills required to build SQL, PL/SQL, and Java applications that interact with Oracle8i.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780072124422
  • Publisher: Osborn Foundation
  • Publication date: 8/1/2000
  • Series: Oracle Press Series
  • Edition description: BK&CD-ROM
  • Pages: 528
  • Product dimensions: 7.32 (w) x 9.04 (h) x 1.39 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Introducting Oracle8i

Most everyone has heard the cliche, "information is power." And is this ever true. When you think about it, one of the most important assets of any institution is its information. For example, a typical business must keep track of its customers, orders, product inventory, and employee information for obvious reasons. Additionally, the analysis of pertinent business information can help make a company more competitive. For example, a sales analyst can use current sales data to forecast future sales and identify trends that might help to improve overall business profitability.

Information Management

In today's world of high technology, computers manage most information because they make it easy to organize, store, and protect valuable data. The proliferation of powerful personal computers and networks has made it possible for all businesses, large and small alike, to quickly and safely make information readily available to people that require access to it.

Databases

Computers typically store and organize large amounts of information within a database. A database, whether or not a computer manages it, is nothing more than an orderly collection of related information. A database safely stores information and organizes it for fast retrieval. For example, a business can use a database to store tables of customer records, corresponding sales orders, product parts, and employee lists. Various workers can then use the database to efficiently perform their jobs. For example, salespeople can quickly enter or look up sales orders, advertising executives can study and forecast product sales, and warehouse personnel can efficientlymanage product inventories.

Types of Databases Databases come in many varieties. Inverted list, hierarchic, and network database models are older types of database systems that, in general, are inflexible and difficult to work with. These types of database systems were originally designed primarily for prescribed transactions that input data rather than dynamic environments where data analysis is critical.

The very weaknesses of these earlier systems are exactly why relational database systems now dominate newer information management systems. Relational databases are easy to understand, design, and build. Relational databases store and present all information in tables, an easily understood concept. Furthermore, relational databases hide the complexities of data access from the user, making application development relatively simple when compared to other types of database systems.

Object-oriented databases are a relatively new type of system that supports the object-oriented development paradigm. The primary goal of object-oriented thinking is to raise the level of abstraction so that it is more natural to design and build an information management system. For example, in an object-oriented database, complex data structures called objects closely model the entities in a business system, while methods match the business operations that act upon the objects in the system. So, rather than store tables of, say, customers, orders, and order line items, a database stores instances of customers and sales order objects. Associated methods stored in the database describe how to add, change, and delete customer and sales order objects.

Database Management Systems

A database management system (DBMS) is computer software that manages access to databases. A typical multiuser DBMS performs the following tasks, and more:

  • A DBMS safely manages shared access to a single database among multiple concurrent users. For example, a DBMS locks data as users add and update information, so that users do not destructively interfere with one another's work.
  • A DBMS uses computer resources wisely so that a large number of application users can perform work with fast response times for maximum productivity.
  • A DBMS protects database information in such a way that it can reconstruct work lost due to anything from a simple power outage to catastrophic site disasters.
You can purchase any one of several commercially available DBMSs to build and manage databases. The market-leading DBMS in use today is Oracle Corporation's Oracle Data Server, also known simply as Oracle. The latest version of Oracle is Oracle8i, and it is an object-relational database management system (ORDBMS). That is, Oracle8i is a database server that offers the capabilities of both relational and object-oriented database systems. The goal of this book is to teach you how Oracle8i works and how to get started using the software's most typically used features.

Oracle8i, Building on Oracle? and Oracle8

Oracle8i builds on the strengths of its predecessors, Oracle? and Oracle8.0. Oracle?, originally released in early 1993, set a lofty standard for high-end relational database management systems. Oracle7's many features made it a potent database server for all types of common business applications, including.

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Table of Contents

1 Introducing Oracle8i 3
2 Installing Oracle8i enterprise Edition for Linux 11
3 Configuring Oracle8i for Access 35
4 Basic Database Access with SQL 79
5 Writing Database Access Programs with PL/SQL 109
6 Using Java with Oracle8i 155
7 Building a Basic Relational Schema 193
8 Extending Oracle with Objects 233
9 Securing Database Access 271
10 Managing Database Space 303
11 Database Protection 361
12 Basic Tuning 411
Index 451
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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2001

    Too many mistakes

    There are too many mistakes in this book to be useful. If you follow the directions, you find that they do not work. When you go through and decipher what was written you see that often times the one section will have caps and the next section will have the same information in lowercase. Unlike Windows, in Linux there is a difference and you often have to merge the two together and figure out what goes where to get things to work. Some, just don't work. Someone needed to actually try the commands given before the book went to the printer.

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