The Orange Eats Creeps

The Orange Eats Creeps

3.3 17
by Grace Krilanovich
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

* National Book Foundation's '5 Under 35' Selection.
* NPR Best Books of 2010: A Hidden Gem.
* The Believer Book Award Finalist.

"The exhilaration of such a novel is nearly beyond calculation. If a new literature is at hand then it might as well begin here."
—Steve Erickson, from his Introduction

"The book feels written in a fever; it

Overview

* National Book Foundation's '5 Under 35' Selection.
* NPR Best Books of 2010: A Hidden Gem.
* The Believer Book Award Finalist.

"The exhilaration of such a novel is nearly beyond calculation. If a new literature is at hand then it might as well begin here."
—Steve Erickson, from his Introduction

"The book feels written in a fever; it is breathless, scary and like nothing I've ever read before. Krilanovich's work will make you believe that new ways of storytelling are still emerging from the margins."
NPR.org

"Grace Krilanovich’s first book is a steamy cesspool of language that stews psychoneurosis and viscera into a horrific new organism — the sort of muck in which Burroughs, Bataille, and Kathy Acker loved to writhe."
The Believer

It's the '90s Pacific Northwest refracted through a dark mirror, where meth and madness hash it out in the woods. . . . A band of hobo vampire junkies roam the blighted landscape—trashing supermarket breakrooms, praying to the altar of Poison Idea and GG Allin at basement rock shows, crashing senior center pancake breakfasts—locked in the thrall of Robitussin trips and their own wild dreams.

A girl with drug-induced ESP and an eerie connection to Patty Reed (a young member of the Donner Party who credited her survival to her relationship with a hidden wooden doll), searches for her disappeared foster sister along "The Highway That Eats People," stalked by a conflation of Twin Peaks' "Bob" and the Green River Killer, known as Dactyl.

With a scathing voice and penetrating delivery, Grace Krilanovich's The Orange Eats Creeps is one of the most ferocious debut novels in memory.

Grace Krilanovich has been a MacDowell colony fellow and a finalist for the Starcherone Prize.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A posse of ravenous teenagers rampages through Krilanovich's slyly arch debut, devouring and destroying everything unfortunate enough to be in its path. Creatures of enormous appetites for sex and food and diversion, they're 100% id and described by the unnamed female narrator as "Slutty Teenage Hobo Vampire Junkies," though their vampire bona fides are a matter of question. The story careens from encounter to encounter, bursting into vibrant tableaus of images and barrages of prickly observations ("Death is sewing a calico dress next to a fire in the ground. Do you dare approach her, little boy?") that, for a while, stand in for plot. As they accumulate, a pattern emerges of a relatively ordinary life rocked by unspecified cataclysmic events--probably war--while, in her roaming, the heroine intermittently searches for and laments the loss of a surrogate sister named Kim until a final confrontation with a warlock brings closure to the story, even as it raises more questions. Krilanovich's postmodern mashup is refreshingly piquant and playful, reminiscent of postmodern Euro fiction and full of poison pill observations. (Sept.)
From the Publisher
"Grace Krilanovich's first book is a steamy cesspool of language that stews psychoneurosis and viscera into a horrific new organism—the sort of muck in which Burroughs, Bataille, and Kathy Acker loved to writhe."—The Believer

"Krilanovich's work will make you believe that new ways of storytelling are still emerging from the margins."—NPR.org

"One of 2010's small-press triumphs."—The Week

"The Orange Eats Creeps contains the hallucinatory, disjointed, plotless, yet bizarrely charming ravings of a young refugee from foster care who now belongs to a pack of teenage hobo vampires that rove convenience stores and supermarkets high on Robitussin and mop buckets of coffee."—Newsday

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780982015186
Publisher:
Two Dollar Radio
Publication date:
09/01/2010
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
685,644
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 7.60(h) x 0.57(d)

Meet the Author

Grace Krilanovich (Author): Grace Krilanovich is a graduate of the California Institute of the Arts, where she received her MFA. She has been a finalist for the Starcherone Prize, has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize, published in Black Clock, and a fellow of the MacDowell Colony. The Orange Eats Creeps is her first novel.

Steve Erickson (Introduction): Steve Erickson is the author of eight novels: Days Between Stations (1985), Rubicon Beach (1986), Tours of the Black Clock (1989), Arc d'X (1993), Amnesiascope (1996), The Sea Came in at Midnight (1999), Our Ecstatic Days (2005) and Zeroville (2007).

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Orange Eats Creeps 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Norm3 More than 1 year ago
WONDERFUL BEYOND DESCRIPTION!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 'Makes me sad that the Golden Age of Hollywood is so long past. This book would have made FANTASTIC source material for one of Vincent Minnellis' lavish MGM productions. 'Score by Arthur Freed, of course. I see the fabulous Judy Garland, Fred Astaire, Mickey Rooney and June Allison in the leads! George Kaufman, of course, would have written the screenplay. Well............... a fan can dream! :-)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
You have just got to get into this book and let it take you on the ride. Wow!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Author_RichardThomas More than 1 year ago
Originally I gave this 4 stars, but after a long chat with Blake Butler I think I'm going to give it 5. The more it sits with me, the more I like it. The Orange Eats Creeps (Two Dollar Radio) by Grace Krilanovich has been getting a lot of attention. When Steve Erickson says about your book, ".if a new literature is at hand then it might as well begin here," you know that this is something different. Set in the Pacific Northwest in the 1990s this is the story of a band of "hobo vampire junkies" who roam the woods strung out on meth, cruising underground rock concerts, in a hallucinatory daze. This is the story of a girl with "drug-induced ESP" who is searching for her lost foster sister, a surreal vision of her lost life, a narrative that is disjointed, fragmented, and surprisingly touching. I have to admit that I struggled with this book at first, until I realized that I had to let go what I thought a book should be, what a story should be, and just let the book take me over. This book has been compared to such challenging and visionary voices as William Burroughs, William Blake, Céline and Henry Rollins, and reading the blurbs by Steve Erickson and Brian Evenson, I was immediately reminded of their work as well. It's a wild ride, and this book is not for everyone. [continued at The Nervous Breakdown, where Blake Butler and I discuss this book at great length]
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Noviello More than 1 year ago
This brilliant novel is unlike any other you have ever read. It will haunt you the rest of your life.