The Orb of Chatham

The Orb of Chatham

5.0 1
by Bob Staake
     
 

"With his own stunning black-and-white artwork, Cape Cod author-illustrator Bob Staake tells the tale of five witnesses who vanished inexplicably after reporting a strange floating ""Orb"" in Chatham, Massachusetts, in 1935. "

Overview

"With his own stunning black-and-white artwork, Cape Cod author-illustrator Bob Staake tells the tale of five witnesses who vanished inexplicably after reporting a strange floating ""Orb"" in Chatham, Massachusetts, in 1935. "

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781933212142
Publisher:
Commonwealth Editions
Publication date:
06/28/2005
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.26(w) x 8.08(h) x 0.38(d)

Meet the Author

Known for his spontaneous, high-energy drawing style, Bob Staake provides humorous illustrations and cartoons for everything from magazines to books, animation to greeting cards, advertising to newspapers, cereal boxes to CD-ROM games. He has authored and/or illustrated over 39 books, including Hello Robots! (Viking), My Little Color Zoo (Simon & Schuster) and The Red Lemon (Random House). The Orb Of Chatham marks a new departure for Staakeohis first black-and-white picture book that is also part graphic novel, part mystery.

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Orb of Chatham 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
psycheKK More than 1 year ago
Truth be told, I bought this book for me.  But my son saw it when I opened the package, and he said "Have it!"  I'm not even going to try to explain to a little boy why he can't have a picture book, so I bought another copy -- problem solved.  I bought this book for the illustrations.  You may not know Staake's name, but most likely you know his artwork; it often graces the covers of the New Yorker, and shows up in many other places.  His works features clean lines, remarkable shading, and simple subject that virtually jumps off the page.  It is always beautiful, in a sort of modern Art Deco way.  The illustrations in this book are all that and a bit of film noir --  and nothing short of breathtakingly brilliant. The story, which I thought would be secondary in this book, surprised me with its Goreyesque quality. I was delighted.  And heartened, because even though Edward Gorey is no longer with us, Bob Staake still very much is.