Orbiter (NOOK Comic with Zoom View)

Orbiter (NOOK Comic with Zoom View)

4.6 5
by Warren Ellis
     
 

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Warren Ellis's and Colleen Doran's acclaimed original VERTIGO graphic novel. When a space shuttle crash lands on Earth after being missing for a decade, it unlocks a mystery that will unfold deep in outer space. Can a team of three specialists cheated out of their dream of spaceflight discover the nature of this bizarre space-borne anomaly?

Overview

Warren Ellis's and Colleen Doran's acclaimed original VERTIGO graphic novel. When a space shuttle crash lands on Earth after being missing for a decade, it unlocks a mystery that will unfold deep in outer space. Can a team of three specialists cheated out of their dream of spaceflight discover the nature of this bizarre space-borne anomaly?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781401252243
Publisher:
DC Comics
Publication date:
04/29/2014
Sold by:
DC Comics
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
48 MB
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This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Warren Ellis is a prolific writer whose works include the novel Crooked Little Vein (William Morrow) and, for Marvel Comics, Iron Man, Nextwave, Newuniversal and many others. His work for DC Comics includes PLANETARY, RED, STORMWATCH, OCEAN, GLOBAL FREQUENCY, HELLBLAZER, and a five-year run on TRANSMETROPOLITAN.

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Orbiter 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A very good book that makes a person think and draws a person in very quickly. Also very applicable to what is going on with the Columbia tragedy right now.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book is well printed and carefully bound, with an attractive cover. There is little text, so it is primarily a book of illustrations. Its theme is 'They Are Waiting For Us Out There,' which has often been seen in other formats. The new variant is that the world, grown weary of hoisting religeous artifacts and millionaire playboys into orbit, utterly lost its patience the day a newly launched shuttle just plain disappeared. Didn't explode, didn't crash, just vanished into thin air (or thin space). The story opens ten years later, when the shuttle comes crashing home, to a home which has pretty well run down and been abandoned to a colony of squatters. Some of the most inspiring panels of the whole book depict this boy who, having been sent out to dump the morning trash, climbs a sandbar overlooking the sea to admire the view. Unfortunately, this is the first glimpse of the returning spaceship, and what follows from then on is rather unpleasant, in many respects and on many levels. The book carries a caution that it is for mature readers, but the only reason that seems to be necessary is the liberal use of foul language by all and sundry. It may be appropriate for the overbearing military person, but otherwise it is unnecessary and only detracts from the story. In any event, the story is convoluted enough and gruesome enough that it is not for children. But in any event, the ship has come to rest and an investigation naturally ensues. A crew is rounded up, centering around a quartet of experts and enthusiasts, a theme which is again familiar from other contexts. Such alien technology as is revealed speaks of islands of stability in the chart of transuranic elements, a nice hidden-line drawing, and some algebraic formulas; gravity and black holes are lurking in the darkness! One hopes that the psychiatric cajolery which is used to start the returning pilot talking is more solidly based than the physics of the propulsion unit. Neverthelesss, he revives and takes the gang for a tour in his newly outfitted chariot. We breathlessly await the sequel: have they simply absconded with an expensive piece of government property, or is this truly the beginning of a new era. If they return, those takeoffs and landings are going to be pretty traumatic. As we await further plot development, we realize that the impact of any graphic novel depends heavily on the illustrator. Those who like the drawing style will find the story to have been greatly enhanced thereby, and will relish having bought the book. (Some of the art may be available separately.)
Guest More than 1 year ago
Writer Warren Ellis and artist Colleen Doran have fashioned a timely tale that will help re-ignite the dreamer that lurks in all of us. If you are interested in the subject of spaceflight, or if you ever just looked up to the night sky and wondered what's out there - this is the book for you. Ellis has created a trio of characters who represent the hopes and dreams of those of us who followed the space program through its ups and downs - and who were shattered by the disasters that befell it. These three find new meaning in their lives when the space shuttle Venture returns to Earth ten years late and they are presented with the task of finding out where it has been for all that time. The answer to that question might just be the most important in human history. The story unfolds at a breathtaking pace, but knows when to slow down to give reign to the emotions of those involved in solving the mystery. Ellis's terse, no nonsense writing style brings utter believability to the proceedings. Doran has responded to the script by providing some of her most startling artwork to date. Using a style full of stark contrasts, she gives a glimpse into a world which lost hope when it lost the Venture. It doesn't always work, but it is very appropriate for the story. Her figurework is exceptional, with characters recognisable from their body language alone; and her full-page renditions of the wonders encountered by the Venture on its travels are stunning. The subtle colours from Dave Stewart help bring out the very best in the art. While I would have preferred the book to have a few more pages to more fully flesh out the characters and the situation, overall this graphic novel is a joy to read. It belongs on the shelf of everyone who ever had a passing interest in the subject of man in space - and perhaps even moreso on the shelves of those who don't...
Guest More than 1 year ago
Writer Warren Ellis and artist Colleen Doran have, in Orbiter, fashioned a timely tale that re-ignites the dreamer in all of us. If you ever followed the news reports of spaceflight, or if you ever just looked up to the night sky and wondered what's out there... this is the book for you. By its end you'll know how the story of manned spaceflight was supposed to turn out. Ellis has created a trio of characters who represent the hopes and dreams of those of us who followed the space program through its ups and downs - and who were shattered by the disasters that befell it. These characters find new meaning in their lives when the space shuttle Venture returns to Earth ten years late and they are tasked with finding out what happened to it. The answer may just be the most important in human history. Doran has responded to the story by providing some of her most startling artwork to date. Using a style full of stark contrasts, she gives a glimpse into a world which lost hope when it lost the Venture. It doesn't always work, but it is very appropriate for the story. Her figurework is exceptional, with characters recognisable from body language alone, and her full-page renditions of the wonders encountered by the Venture on its travels are stunning. The subtle colours from Dave Stewart help bring out the very best in the art. While I would have preferred the book to have just a few more pages to fully flesh out the characters and the situation, and to provide a slightly more gentle ending, overall this is a joy to read. It belongs on the shelf of everyone who ever had a passing interest in the subject of man in space - and even moreso on the shelves of those who don't...
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've seen an advance set of page proofs from ORBITER and recommend this without any reservations whatsoever. Beautifully packaged, from its elegant dust jacket to the interior color pages, this Warren Ellis (writer)-Colleen Doran (artist) collaboration shines: Both are space enthusiasts who endorse the subtext of the book -- that space is our destiny, that we will go to the stars because it is in our hearts. An original graphic novel, the art by Colleen Doran -- penciled and inked by her -- is complemented by exquisite coloring. The overall effect is visually stunning: Splash pages and double pages with art of the space shuttle itself are striking. Ms. Doran has obviously done her research and homework on this book, because the details are dead-on: from side shots of a Huey helicopter to balletic shots of the space shuttle in space, the graphic storytelling -- the panel from panel progressions -- tell the story in a fluid manner. In the works for a year, this book may seem inappropriately timed, but I would disagree: The timeless message that mankind is headed to the stars bears repeating at a time when some people's visions are cast downward, ignoring the beckoning stars. An original graphic novel, this team of Ellis & Doran has done what I would have liked to see NASA do: Use popular culture, especially comics, as a way of reaching out to new generations of young readers, the space enthusiasts whose sense of wonder will be rekindled along with their imaginations with imaginatively rich literary-artistic fare such as this.