The Orchid Affair (Pink Carnation Series #8)

( 71 )

Overview

Veteran governess Laura Grey joins the Selwick Spy School expecting to find elaborate disguises and thrilling adventures in service to the spy known as the Pink Carnation. She hardly expects her first assignment to be serving as governess for the children of André Jaouen, right-hand man to Bonaparte's minister of police.

At first the job is as lively as Latin, but Laura begins to notice Jaouen's increasingly strange behavior. As Laura edges closer to her employer, she is ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (17) from $3.73   
  • New (6) from $8.59   
  • Used (11) from $3.73   
The Orchid Affair (Pink Carnation Series #8)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$7.99
BN.com price

Overview

Veteran governess Laura Grey joins the Selwick Spy School expecting to find elaborate disguises and thrilling adventures in service to the spy known as the Pink Carnation. She hardly expects her first assignment to be serving as governess for the children of André Jaouen, right-hand man to Bonaparte's minister of police.

At first the job is as lively as Latin, but Laura begins to notice Jaouen's increasingly strange behavior. As Laura edges closer to her employer, she is surprised to learn that she has much in common with him. And Jaouen finds he's hired more than he's bargained for...

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews

Espionage and romance continue to be great fun in another solid installment of the Pink Carnation series.

In her eighth series adventure, Willig (The Mischief of the Mistletoe, 2010, etc) takes a cue from Jane Eyre, presenting an orphaned governess as her latest heroine and, of course, spy. Miss Laura Grey has learned to hide her voluptuous beauty under a stern schoolmistress's guise. But when an opportunity to break out of her rut appears, she grabs it, landing an assignment that uses her real history as a governess to strike a blow for England in the ongoing Napoleonic wars. Assuming the French identity of her father and placed in charge of the children of the widowed revolutionary André Jaouen, Laura—now Laure Griscogne—discovers the Paris of her childhood has become a grim and fearful place. When an old family acquaintance nearly blows her cover, however, she begins to see a different side of her employer—and he of her. Although he apparently works at the Prefecture of Paris hunting enemies of the state, Jaouen has grown dismayed by the Reign of Terror, and the two may actually be on the same side. On the run, they learn to trust each other in order to not only survive but to protect his innocent children. The action builds up to an utterly predictable but enjoyable climax. Thanks to Willig's customary wit and sure hand with historical details, 19th-century France comes alive yet again in this volume. Laura is a solid heroine, headstrong and mature enough to be believable. And if the charged romance between the two is a little clichéd, readers of the series will hardly care. Only the series' contemporary framing device, featuring a Harvard researcher and her boyfriend, seems a little strained, but it takes up little space in this otherwise fast-paced and fun frolic.

Willig's sparkling series continues to elevate the Regency romance genre.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780451235558
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 1/3/2012
  • Series: Pink Carnation Series , #8
  • Pages: 496
  • Sales rank: 202,146
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.52 (h) x 1.05 (d)

Meet the Author

Lauren Willig

Lauren Willig is the author of seven previous Pink Carnation novels. She received a graduate degree in English history from Harvard University and a J.D. from Harvard Law School, and now writes full-time. Willig lives in New York City

Biography

Although she may not have realized it at the time, Lauren Willig had her life pretty clearly mapped out when she was a mere nine-year-old. That's when she completed her first "novel" -- 300 handwritten pages of a Nancy Drew-inspired mystery titled The Night the Clock Struck Death featuring not one, but two teenage sleuths. (Twin detectives, if you please!) She sent it off to Simon & Schuster -- who promptly sent it back. "I was utterly crushed for at least a week," the young author admits.

Crushed, perhaps, but apparently the pull of becoming a writer was considerably stronger than the sting of rejection. Several years later, while she was in grad school, Willig began work on another novel -- although she wasn't sure which novel it would be. "There were three contenders: one, the Pink Carnation; another, a mystery novel set at Yale; and the third, a historical novel set around a group of Luddites in 1812. The Yalie mystery novel nearly won out... but the image of a masked spy on a rope tipped the balance the other way, and The Pink Carnation was born."

A witty melding of espionage thriller, swashbuckler, and the kind of classic "bodice-ripping" romance novels she first discovered at the tender age of six, The Secret History of the Pink Carnation was published in 2005. The premise is irresistible: A modern grad student researching her dissertation in London stumbles on the identity of a mysterious English spy from the Napoleonic Wars. With its clever book-within-a-book format, Willig's novel was an instant sensation. Almost immediately, she penned the sequel, The Masque of the Black Tulip. Willig was off and running with a hot and sexy – not to mention bestselling -- series.

Although the Pink Carnation books build on one another, each story focuses on a different pair of lovers and can be read as a stand-alone. Willig tries to weave in any information from previous installments that might be key to understanding the characters or plot. All her books have become Romantic Times Top Picks. In 2006 Lauren was nominated for a Quill Award.

Good To Know

Even before she committed her stories to paper, Willig was amusing herself with her very own fiction in the privacy of her head. "I remember lying in bed, staring up at the underside of my canopy, composing complicated narratives complete with dialogue, generally based on whatever movie I had just seen," she told The Readers Place.com. "Star Wars spawned weeks' worth of bedtime dramas in which I starred as Princess Lea's best friend. Who would, of course, wind up with Luke Skywalker as co-ruler of the Universe -- you know what they say, if you're going to dream, dream big."

According to Willig's official biography, she is a Native New Yorker. However, she admits that this isn't entirely true being that she was actually born in Philadelphia -- a fact that her "real" Native New Yorker siblings aren't quick to let Lauren forget.

Some fun and fascinating outtakes from our interview with Willig:

"Like my modern heroine, Eloise, I spent a year in England doing research for my dissertation (mine is about Royalist conspiracies during the English Civil Wars in the 1640s), and living in a little basement flat in Bayswater. Unlike Eloise, on my very first week in London, I ate a bad kebab, and got so sick that I wound up briefly back in the States, on the same medicine they give people who have anthrax poisoning. Not exactly an auspicious beginning...."

"I still don't have a driver's license. Having grown up in Manhattan, there was never any need of it -- other than as a means of getting into bars, and learning to drive seemed a bit extreme just to get a drink. Of course, that was before I moved to Cambridge for grad school and realized that in other parts of the world, you can't just walk into the middle of the street, stick your arm up into the air, and, lo!, immediate transportation appears. Since I really don't want to have to learn how to drive, I've decided the only remedy is just to live in Manhattan for the rest of my life."

"Many years ago, at my Yale college interview, the interviewer took one look at my resume, and announced, ‘You can't be a writer.'

Getting a little panicky -- since no one takes kindly to having their life's dream flung in their face -- I blurted out, ‘Why not?'

‘Writers,' he said firmly, ‘are introverts. You,' he indicated the long list of clubs on my resume, Drama Club, Choral Club, Forensics, interschool plays and public speaking competitions, ‘are not.'"

"It is true; I've never been able to resist a stage. There are embarassing videos (which may have to be confiscated and burnt at some point) from various family weddings, where I, as a wee child, coopted the microphone to serenade the wedding guests with off-key renderings of "Memory" (from Cats). It's a wonder I lived past the age of ten without being murdered by a bride wielding a sharpened cake knife. Point me to a podium, and I can talk indefinitely (and usually do, as anyone who was with me in the Yale Political Union can verify). I simpered through Gilbert & Sullivan Society productions, taught drama to small tots through Yale Drama Hands-On Theatre Workshop, and was chairman of a debating society in college. And those were only the official performances. Recently, I appeared in a toga and bare feet (well, really a chiton, but why be picky?) in front of a hundred-odd people at the law school to argue a mock Athenian trial. And, yes, those pictures will also be confiscated and burnt -- as soon as I find out where my camera-happy friends hid them."

"I've always had trouble with the ‘writer as introvert' trope. I argued then, and still believe now, that the performative arts and creative writing have a great deal in common. After all, music, drama, public speaking, writing... all involve words! My interviewer wasn't too impressed by that argument, but there is a bit more to it than that. Singing and public speaking create an enhanced awareness for the rhythm of language. As for drama, how better to get inside one's characters' heads than to walk in their footsteps? Frequently, while writing, I'll tumble out of my chair (literally -- my chair isn't all that sturdy) and act out bits of a scene for a more concrete grasp of a character's movements. Most of all, acting, singing, and writing all involve the desire to get out there and share a story, a desire that can't be balked by the threat of rotton tomatoes, or even bad reviews."

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      New York, New York and Cambridge, Massachusetts
    1. Date of Birth:
      March 28, 1977
    2. Place of Birth:
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    1. Education:
      B.A., Yale University, 1999; M.A., Harvard University, 2001
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 71 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(37)

4 Star

(15)

3 Star

(12)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 72 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 8, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Another amazing book by Lauren Willig!

    I've followed this series from the beginning, and while this is not my favorite, I loved this book! Laura is so prim at the beginning of the novel, but she quickly becomes endearing as the story unfolds. She learns to let the world truly see HER as the book progresses. One of the things that I love about Lauren's books are her strong female characters. All of the characters are fun and real. ? it!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 20, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    This is another of Lauren Willig's Pink Carnation series. I love

    This is another of Lauren Willig's Pink Carnation series. I loved it. I haven't read one of hers for a little while, so I was happy to return to the series. Her strong female characters are wonderful. This one is about Laura Gray, Governess, who is also the Silver Orchid - spying in France for the British government. She is 32 years old and has been on her own since her parents died when she was 16. She learned to be a governess to survive and she was quite good at it. And, of course she falls in love with the man she is supposed to watch - Andre Jaouoen - but you knew that would happen. Anyway, in the course of their adventures, Miss Gray pulls off these wonderful portrayals astounding Andre and the reader as well as the people she is trying to fool. It was GREAT! The best quote came near the end in her altercation with DeLarouche (the evil assistant Minister of Police) when he asks her, "Who ARE you?" and she says, "The Governess!" in a very BA tone (at least it was in my ears). Be afraid, be so afraid! Anyway, it's a great story based on some historical facts with lots of embellishment. Lauren Willig is so good at this.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 24, 2012

    So much fun - you've got to read it!

    As always, Lauren Willig did it. This was just another wonderful book in the series. The characters are easy to love. It makes you wish for a sequel to their story, and then I'm sure a wish for another. Read it and enjoy!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 20, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Suddenly disappointing.

    I've been reading this series since the Pink Carnation debuted. I love the stories, both the spies and Eloise, but what is the deal with this new cheesy cover?? It seems silly, but when I buy books, I think about how they will look on my book shelf. All the other covers have been so sweet, but the 8th and 9th book covers are awful. I think it cheapens the book to a grocery store paperback romance novel level. I will wait for better cover before I buy anymore of this series.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 5, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    HIGHLY RECOMMEND

    I love this author, with each book they just get better and better. You just don't want to put them down and you will go back and reread them too cus they are just that GOOD!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 13, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Jennifer Rummel for TeensReadToo

    Gold Star Award Winner! Laura Grey doesn't want to be a governess anymore. Instead, she applies to the Selwick Spy School. After completing her training, she's sent to France to infiltrate the house of Andre Jaouen - as a governess. Known as the Silver Orchid, she's to teach his two children. On her first day, she takes the children to the bookstore to select reading material for them. It's also the place where she'll receive messages from the Pink Carnation herself. However, as soon as they return, Monsieur Jaouen forbids them to leave the house again. Laura isn't sure how she'll receive her messages now, but she's determined not to let M. Jaouen intimidate her. She stands up to him as much as she possibly can without getting fired. Gradually, she begins to unravel the secrets in the house of the man second in line to Bonaparte's minister of police. As she learns more about her employer, will she find her heart changing? I love this series! It's one of my favorites. I enjoyed this new spy's tale in the heat of the French Revolution. I liked the devious plots, the false leads, and how everyone wasn't what they seemed. I liked watching the relationship between Laura and the children grow. I loved the banter between Laura and M. Jaouen., and I also loved the present-day parallel story between Eloise and Colin. I can't wait for the next book in the series!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 16, 2011

    Well Done Ms. Willig

    Our fave Ms. Lauren Willig has returned with another page turner for us. And she gives us a meaty read this go round. I truly feel that she gets better with every book. As I read each page I just felt so full. Whether she was giving you character background or historical detail of the time she presented it in a way that fills you to the brim but makes you want more of the same. I guess what I'm saying is that she gives you a full novel thru & thru. You are satisfied at the end and can't wait for the next book.
    Yes the whole Eloise & Colin bit is wearing a bit thin. Basically because there's no clarity as to why they are included in the books. What's their purpose? But she makes such smooth transitions between time periods and there weren't as many this time around til it is only mildly irksome. I also felt that she got started with the romance late in the book so it felt rushed in the end a bit too contrived, if you will. But again that was only mildly irksome. You'll enjoy trust me.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 22, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    The eighth Pink Carnation historical thriller is a great tale filled with action

    In 1804 governess Laura Grey leaves England after ten years employed there to come home to Paris to spy on Napoleon. She enrolled at the Selwick Spy School where Laura was sort of trained in espionage under the code name Silver Orchid. In France, undercover as Laure Griscogne she becomes governess to widower Andre Jaouen's two children (nine years old Gabrielle and five years old Pierre-Andre). However, her mission is to use her new position to learn what her employer, the assistant Prefect to the Minister of Police, knows.

    The plot deploys perfectly in spite of Laure's lack of experience and limited training; in fact her being a tyro spy helps her conceal her probing. Meanwhile Griscogne and his rival Gaston Delaroche investigate the latest alleged Royalist plot to dispose of Napoleon. However, whereas Griscogne cares about the French, Delaroche cares about himself so he uses this inquiry to destroy his enemy. This leads to Laure and the Jaouen family fleeing for their lives across France; the adults pose as mom and dad and the Pink Carnation assists them while Delaroche seizes the opportunity.

    The eighth Pink Carnation historical thriller (see The Betrayal of the Blood Lily) is a great tale filled with action from the moment Laure comes home and never slows down until the final altercation. Fast-paced with a strong cast (including the ambitious villain) who bring to life France in 1804 and a sort of historiographical perspective as each of the adults and others look back with different views from fondness to disdain to the 1789 Revolution.

    Harriet Klausner

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 72 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)