Ordinary Mind: Exploring the Common Ground of Zen and Psychotherapy

Ordinary Mind: Exploring the Common Ground of Zen and Psychotherapy

5.0 1
by Barry Magid
     
 

Is meditation an escape from—or a solution to—our psychological problems? Is the use of antidepressants counter to spiritual practice? Does a psychological approach to meditation reduce spirituality to "self-help"? What can Zen and psychoanalysis teach us about the problems of the mind and suffering?

Psychiatrist and Zen teacher Barry Magid is uniquely

Overview

Is meditation an escape from—or a solution to—our psychological problems? Is the use of antidepressants counter to spiritual practice? Does a psychological approach to meditation reduce spirituality to "self-help"? What can Zen and psychoanalysis teach us about the problems of the mind and suffering?

Psychiatrist and Zen teacher Barry Magid is uniquely qualified to answer questions like these. Written in an engaging and witty style, Ordinary Mind helps us understand challenging ideas—like Zen Buddhism's concepts of oneness, emptiness, and enlightenment—and how they make sense, not only within psychoanalytic conceptions of mind, but in the realities of our lives and relationships.

This new paper edition of Magid's much-praised book contains additional case study vignettes.

Editorial Reviews

A Journal of the American Psychiatric Association Psychiatric Services
"A fascinating thesis in an engaging storytelling style. This thoughtful book can inspire us to look at our own lives and our own paths."
the newsletter of the Division of Psychoanalysis Psychologist-Psychoanalyst
"Magid teaches a Zen of everyday, ordinary experience. He describes the upper reaches of human development as the embodiment of a great wisdom, the practice of 'everydayness' as a personal harmony with the order of that which is."
Professor Jeremy D. Safran
"A wise and thought-provoking book that will have a significant impact on the way people think about the relationship between Zen and Western psychotherapy in the future."
Charlotte Joko Beck
"A wise and insightful guide to living a saner life."—
From the Publisher

"A fascinating thesis in an engaging storytelling style. This thoughtful book can inspire us to look at our own lives and our own paths."
Psychiatric Services, A Journal of the American Psychiatric Association

"Magid teaches a Zen of everyday, ordinary experience. He describes the upper reaches of human development as the embodiment of a great wisdom, the practice of 'everydayness' as a personal harmony with the order of that which is."
Psychologist-Psychoanalyst, the newsletter of the Division of Psychoanalysis

"A wise and thought-provoking book that will have a significant impact on the way people think about the relationship between Zen and Western psychotherapy in the future."
—Professor Jeremy D. Safran, editor of Psychoanalysis and Buddhism

"A wise and insightful guide to living a saner life."
—Charlotte Joko Beck, author of Everyday Zen

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780861713066
Publisher:
Wisdom Publications MA
Publication date:
03/28/2000
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
917,139
Product dimensions:
6.36(w) x 9.26(h) x 0.77(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"A fascinating thesis in an engaging storytelling style. This thoughtful book can inspire us to look at our own lives and our own paths."
Psychiatric Services, A Journal of the American Psychiatric Association

"Magid teaches a Zen of everyday, ordinary experience. He describes the upper reaches of human development as the embodiment of a great wisdom, the practice of 'everydayness' as a personal harmony with the order of that which is."
Psychologist-Psychoanalyst, the newsletter of the Division of Psychoanalysis

"A wise and thought-provoking book that will have a significant impact on the way people think about the relationship between Zen and Western psychotherapy in the future."
—Professor Jeremy D. Safran, editor of Psychoanalysis and Buddhism

"A wise and insightful guide to living a saner life."
—Charlotte Joko Beck, author of Everyday Zen

Meet the Author

Barry Magid is a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst practicing in New York City, and the founding teacher of the Ordinary Mind Zendo, also in New York. He is the author of the Wisdom titles Ordinary Mind and Ending the Pursuit of Happiness.

Charlotte Joko Beck was an American Zen teacher, founder of the Ordinary Mind Zen School, and author of Everyday Zen: Love and Work and Nothing Special: Living Zen. She is remembered for teaching her students to work with the emotions of everyday life, rather than attempting to escape them, and produced many Dharma heirs who are practicing psychologists and psychiatrists. She passed away in 2011, at the age of 94.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Ordinary Mind: Exploring the Common Ground of Zen and Psychotherapy 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What I found most interesting, and also most valuable, about Barry Magid"s work is his ability to bring together the insights of his psychotherapy practice to the clarity of his role as a zen teacher into one seamless presentation. In fact, the major theme of Ordinary Mind, that there is no sharp boundary between psychology and spirituality, is so well made that the reader will surely have to question any prior assumptions about what psychology is and what spiritual practice is. I particularly liked Magid's thoroughness in clarifying the normally fuzzy thinking that occupies the borderland between psychology and religion. But this is not just an intellectual polemic. Using a combination of honest examples from his own life, the wisdom of the Zen koan, and not least of all, humor, he repeatedly returns to how these issues inform our everyday life as we live it. Time and again he brings us back to the essential point that must be addressd in any approach to living a less self-centered life, whether the approach be that of psychology or spirituality. And that point is that the real satisfaction that all of us are looking for must come from the increasing ability to move away from our false pictures of what life is and what spirituality is, and instead move toward a direct experiencing of our life as it is.