Organic Architecture: The Other Modernism
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Organic Architecture: The Other Modernism

by Alan Hess
     
 
Organic Architecture: The Other Modernism illuminates the broad brush stroke of Organic residential architecture throughout the panorama of twentieth-century Modernism. A wide-ranging style that defies definition, Organic buildings are notable in their curves and colors, as well as their exuberant, opulent, and at times,extravagant complexity of line, form,

Overview

Organic Architecture: The Other Modernism illuminates the broad brush stroke of Organic residential architecture throughout the panorama of twentieth-century Modernism. A wide-ranging style that defies definition, Organic buildings are notable in their curves and colors, as well as their exuberant, opulent, and at times,extravagant complexity of line, form, texture, structure, and color.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781586858575
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
08/02/2006
Pages:
276
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 1.20(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

It is this book's intention to illuminate the broad brush stroke of Organic residential architecture in America throughout the panorama of twentieth-century Modernism. Organic architecture is a style wide ranging enough to defy easy definition, yet vivid enough for people to know it when they see it. It reached a high point in the mid-twentieth century, but it has roots much deeper in American culture than the European Bauhaus architectural style that combined technology, craftsmanship, and aesthetics. Despite being marginalized at times by the tastemakers and professional magazines, Organic architecture has remained a strong, deep running current in American culture and design. There are, of course, Organic office buildings (the Price Tower in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, by Wright), coffee shops (Pann's in Los Angeles, California, by Armét and Davis), churches (Sea Ranch Chapel in Sea Ranch, California, by James Hubbell), as well as other building types, but for the sake of clarity and comparison the focus of this book is on residences.

Meet the Author

Alan Hess is an architect and historian who has written nine books documenting the architectural history of the West's suburban metropolises (including Frank Lloyd Wright: The Houses; The Ranch House; Viva Las Vegas; and The Architecture of John Lautner). He has served as architecture critic for the San Jose Mercury News since 1986. He studied at UCLA's Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Planning, and has been active in the preservation of roadside and post-War architecture, qualifying the nation's oldest McDonald's drive-in, the 1947 Bullock's Pasadena department store, the 1956 Valley Ho Motor Inn in Scottsdale, among others, for the National Register of Historic Places. He received a 1997 Honor Award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation for his efforts to preserve the McDonald's. Hess has taught at the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SciArc) and UCLA. He lives in Irvine, California.

Alan Weintraub is a widely published architectural photographer whose books include Frank Lloyd Wright: The Houses; Lloyd Wright: The Architecture of FLW, Jr.; The Architecture of John Lautner; Oscar Niemeyer: Houses; Rancho Deluxe: Rustic Dreams and Real Western Living, as well as an ongoing work on the modern residential architecture of Brazil.

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