Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry

Overview

Carbon is the foundation of all life on Earth. Most chemicals that contain carbon are called organic compounds. The science that studies these is organic chemistry, and the study of chemical reactions in living organisms is biochemistry. This book, part of a new series that introduces the essentials of chemistry, looks at these vital subjects. Numerous diagrams, features, and key "Science Words" enhance understanding of basic science principles, and "Try This" panels outline experiments that can be undertaken as ...

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Overview

Carbon is the foundation of all life on Earth. Most chemicals that contain carbon are called organic compounds. The science that studies these is organic chemistry, and the study of chemical reactions in living organisms is biochemistry. This book, part of a new series that introduces the essentials of chemistry, looks at these vital subjects. Numerous diagrams, features, and key "Science Words" enhance understanding of basic science principles, and "Try This" panels outline experiments that can be undertaken as a first step to further practical investigations.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Julia Beiker
If wanting to know more about chemicals that contain carbon search the sections about organic chemistry, but if the research goes in the direction of the study of molecule and chemical reactions in living organisms dive into the biochemistry part. This book uses diagrams and real life photographs to demonstrate the complex nature of how everything from flowers to plastic to foods breaks down into chemical reactions. For instance, a plant called cuckoo pint gives off a foul odor made up of a compound comprised of nitrogen and sulfur. Keep reading to learn about polymers and how they make up everything from cellulose in tree wood to starches in bread, potatoes, and rice. Throughout the book, small colorful boxes aid the reader with the more difficult vocabulary by providing simple definitions to complex terms while the try this section gives a hands-on approach to demonstrating how household items can explain chemical reactions. At the front of the book, a contents page gives a basic idea of where to go while the bold face printed titles allows for a quick glance to find relevant information. This book belongs in public, private, and school libraries. This is one the "Facts at Your Fingertips: Introducing Chemistry" series. Reviewer: Julia Beiker
Children's Literature - Julia Beiker
If wanting to know more about chemicals that contain carbon search the sections about organic chemistry, but if the research goes in the direction of the study of molecule and chemical reactions in living organisms dive into the biochemistry part. This book uses diagrams and real life photographs to demonstrate the complex nature of how everything from flowers to plastic to foods breaks down into chemical reactions. For instance, a plant called cuckoo pint gives off a foul odor made up of a compound comprised of nitrogen and sulfur. Keep reading to learn about polymers and how they make up everything from cellulose in tree wood to starches in bread, potatoes, and rice. Throughout the book, small colorful boxes aid the reader with the more difficult vocabulary by providing simple definitions to complex terms while the try this section gives a hands-on approach to demonstrating how household items can explain chemical reactions. At the front of the book, a contents page gives a basic idea of where to go while the bold face printed titles allows for a quick glance to find relevant information. This book belongs in public, private, and school libraries. This is one the "Facts at Your Fingertips: Introducing Chemistry" series. Reviewer: Julia Beiker
School Library Journal
Gr 7–10—The first book provides a detailed account of the metallic elements. The second title covers nonmetals including the halogens and noble gases. In the introduction to Organic Chemistry, the editor states that the book "describes the essentials of chemistry from the fundamentals of atomic structure, through the periodic table…." However, an image of the periodic table does not appear in the book, nor does the term "periodic table" appear in the index. Both would have been useful for students navigating the volumes. The texts are dense and the print is small. The explanations are thorough, and the titles would be best used by students with a basic scientific knowledge. Captioned color photographs appear throughout. Labeled and numbered diagrams illustrate various scientific processes, and boxed "Science Words" highlight words and definitions that can also be found in the glossary. "Try This" boxes suggest experiments that readers can try to begin their practical investigations. Many of the activities seem simplistic, such as the one that instructs readers to place half an apple in a refrigerator and leave the other half out to show how temperature affects the rates of reactions. Another activity requires the use of an empty film canister, which students may or may not be able to find. The "Further Resources" list for each of the three titles is identical. Students would be better served by Monique Laberge's Biochemistry (Chelsea House, 2008) or "The Elements" series (Marshall Cavendish).—Maren Ostergard, King County Library System, Issaquah, WA
School Library Journal
Gr 7–10—The first book provides a detailed account of the metallic elements. The second title covers nonmetals including the halogens and noble gases. In the introduction to Organic Chemistry, the editor states that the book "describes the essentials of chemistry from the fundamentals of atomic structure, through the periodic table…." However, an image of the periodic table does not appear in the book, nor does the term "periodic table" appear in the index. Both would have been useful for students navigating the volumes. The texts are dense and the print is small. The explanations are thorough, and the titles would be best used by students with a basic scientific knowledge. Captioned color photographs appear throughout. Labeled and numbered diagrams illustrate various scientific processes, and boxed "Science Words" highlight words and definitions that can also be found in the glossary. "Try This" boxes suggest experiments that readers can try to begin their practical investigations. Many of the activities seem simplistic, such as the one that instructs readers to place half an apple in a refrigerator and leave the other half out to show how temperature affects the rates of reactions. Another activity requires the use of an empty film canister, which students may or may not be able to find. The "Further Resources" list for each of the three titles is identical. Students would be better served by Monique Laberge's Biochemistry (Chelsea House, 2008) or "The Elements" series (Marshall Cavendish).—Maren Ostergard, King County Library System, Issaquah, WA
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Product Details

Table of Contents

What is organic chemistry? 4

Carbon bonding 6

Carbon chains 10

Carbon rings 16

Alcohols and acids 20

Other organic compounds 24

Polymers 28

Carbohydrates 34

Lipids 38

Proteins and nucleic acids 42

Metabolic pathways 46

Making molecules 54

Glossary 62

Further research 63

Index 64

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