Organizational Report Cards

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$64.60
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $4.36
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 93%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (14) from $4.36   
  • New (6) from $25.00   
  • Used (8) from $4.36   

Overview

In recent years, consumers, professional organizations, government officials, and third-party payers have become increasingly concerned about how to assess the quality of the services provided by organizations in both the private and the public sectors. One new approach is the organizational report card, which compares the performance of organizations such as public schools, colleges, hospitals, and HMOs.

This book offers the first comprehensive study of such instruments. It discusses the circumstances under which they are desirable alternatives to other policy instruments, such as regulation; how they should be designed; who is likely to use them and for what purpose; and what role, if any, government should have in their creation. Informed by cases drawn from education, health, and other policy areas, this book develops a conceptual framework for analyzing these issues. It explores the tradeoffs in measuring performance, the methods of communicating results effectively to mass and elite audiences, and the ways in which organizations respond to the data gathered.
.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Choice

Political scientists Gormley and Weimer offer an insightful and well-written account of an increasingly popular policy tool they refer to as the 'organizational report card.' As they conceive it, the 'organizational report card' is a policy instrument that enhances accountability by providing performance measurements of public and private sector organizations. After elaborating the rationale and history of organizational report cards, the authors consider the methodological challenges associated with designing such instruments...This thoughtful book will be of special value to those interested in policy studies and public administration. Highly recommended for graduate students and faculty as well as practitioners/professionals.
— G. L. Malecha

Choice - G. L. Malecha
Political scientists Gormley and Weimer offer an insightful and well-written account of an increasingly popular policy tool they refer to as the 'organizational report card.' As they conceive it, the 'organizational report card' is a policy instrument that enhances accountability by providing performance measurements of public and private sector organizations. After elaborating the rationale and history of organizational report cards, the authors consider the methodological challenges associated with designing such instruments...This thoughtful book will be of special value to those interested in policy studies and public administration. Highly recommended for graduate students and faculty as well as practitioners/professionals.
Mark H. Moore
In the continuing effort to achieve greater accountability and performance from public sector enterprises, organizational scorecards--systems of measurements that compare similar organizations on key dimensions of performance--have emerged as important policy tools. Gormley and Weimer have done an excellent job of explaining how, and why, and under what circumstances this powerful tool can actually work to improve the performance of both governmental and nonprofit organizations. Since finding effective ways to use measurement to drive the performance of public organizations is key to effectively managing them, this book is a must read for governmental and nonprofit managers.
Helen F. Ladd
In this era of expanding consumer choice, greater diversity among suppliers, and concerns about the quality and cost of services, it is not surprising that report cards on organizations are proliferating in policy areas such as education and health care. But with what effects and at what cost? What makes some report cards productive and others harmful? For answers to these and related questions, read this authoritative and comprehensive book on an intriguing and controversial new policy instrument--the provision of comparative information and rankings on the effectiveness of organizations.
Janet A. Weiss
As organizational report cards have become increasingly common across the public sector, we need to understand their strengths and weaknesses as policy tools. Gormley and Weimer's wonderful book reveals how complicated it is to assess the consequences of making and using a report card for public purposes. Their careful, intelligent analysis shows how this apparently simple, rational tool engages layer upon layer of response, with important implications for the report card writers, the organizations being graded, the public, and the democratic process.
Choice
Political scientists Gormley and Weimer offer an insightful and well-written account of an increasingly popular policy tool they refer to as the 'organizational report card.' As they conceive it, the 'organizational report card' is a policy instrument that enhances accountability by providing performance measurements of public and private sector organizations. After elaborating the rationale and history of organizational report cards, the authors consider the methodological challenges associated with designing such instruments...This thoughtful book will be of special value to those interested in policy studies and public administration. Highly recommended for graduate students and faculty as well as practitioners/professionals.
— G. L. Malecha
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674643505
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 3/28/1999
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.57 (h) x 1.05 (d)

Meet the Author

William T. Gormley, Jr., is Professor of Government and Public Policy, Georgetown University.

David L. Weimer is Professor of Public Policy and Political Science, University of Rochester.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 Introduction 1
2 Report Cards As Policy Instruments 20
3 The Politics of Report Cards 39
4 Assessing Organizational Performance 60
5 Audiences and Their Demands 94
6 Organizational Responses 123
7 Public and Private Roles in Report Card Design 164
8 Conclusion 197
Selected Guide to Organizational Report Cards 235
References 239
Index 265
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)