Organizing from the Inside Out for Teens: The Foolproof System for Organizing Your Room, Your Time, and Your Life

Organizing from the Inside Out for Teens: The Foolproof System for Organizing Your Room, Your Time, and Your Life

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by Julie Morgenstern, Jessi Morgenstern-Colón
     
 

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From Organizing from the Inside Out for Teens:


Jessi Says


What's My Payoff?

My bedroom is my home base and keeping it organized is a must. If my room isn't in solid condition, it's difficult to keep the rest of my life on track. Here are some other reasons that motivate me to keep my room organized:

- My room

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Overview

From Organizing from the Inside Out for Teens:


Jessi Says


What's My Payoff?

My bedroom is my home base and keeping it organized is a must. If my room isn't in solid condition, it's difficult to keep the rest of my life on track. Here are some other reasons that motivate me to keep my room organized:

- My room is the only space on the entire planet that is solely mine.

- My organized room allows me to maximize my space and time.

- My room boosts my confidence.

- My room gives others (especially my mom!) confidence in me.

- Organizing my room allows me to do what I want, when I want.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Another mother/daughter team joins forces in Organizing from the Inside Out for Teens: The Foolproof System for Organizing Your Room, Your Time, and Your Life by Julie Morgenstern with Jessi Morgenstern-Colon. The comprehensive volume opens by assessing the symptoms of disorganization, providing a diagnosis and offering a prescription for change. Subsequent chapters put readers in "Analyze-Strategize-Attack" mode as they take on messy bedrooms, backpacks and cluttered social calendars.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781429998178
Publisher:
Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
09/03/2002
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
813,450
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

The author of the New York Times bestseller Organizing from the Inside Out

(0-8050-5649-1) and Time Management from the Inside Out (0-8050-6469-9), Julie Morgenstern makes regular appearances on Oprah and is a contributing editor to O Magazine.


The author of the New York Times bestseller Organizing from the Inside Out and Time Management from the Inside Out, Julie Morgenstern makes regular appearances on Oprah and is a contributing editor to O Magazine.
Jessi Morgenstern-Colón contributed to Organizing from the Inside Out for Teenagers from Henry Holt and Co..

Read an Excerpt

Why Get Organized?

So, you want to get organized. Well, there are a couple of things to get straight first.

You may have gotten this book from a parent, a teacher, a friend's sister's boyfriend's great-grandmother, or you may have bought it for yourself. It doesn't really matter where you got it, as long as you're reading it because you really, genuinely want to get organized. If you're planning to read this just to get people off your back, you can put the book down right now. Organizing is only worth the effort if you are motivated to do it for yourself;you have to want this.

And more than that: you should understand why you want it. Look, I'm a teenager, too. I know what it's like to have five hours of homework, extracurricular passions that you want to escape into every day after school, and an active social life. All this while constantly being told both to "Never stop adding to your college résumé!" and "Take advantage of your teen years. Use this time to discover yourself!" This book was written to help you set up a system that will enable you to do it all, or at least accomplish more within your given schedule and space.

Have you ever heard the saying "The shoemaker's children never have shoes"? Though I am the daughter of a professional organizer, I have not always been as organized as I am today. It was not some talent passed on through birth; I didn't even learn it at an early age. I have struggled with the issue for years, partly because I didn't feel the need to get organized for a long time, and also I thought being disorganized was the only way I could distinguish myself from my mom and let the world see that I was my own person.

To my mom's credit — although she tried to get my room into shape for years — she let me find my own way about it, all the while pointing out to me the ways in which I was already organized. I was never late for anything; my stuffed animals were always organized neatly by personality; my Barbies (all 102 of them) were in a big bin, which I bought for $5 at a flea market; and my books were all on a shelf in order grouped by type: picture books, easy readers, chapter books, poetry, and series books (Minnie-n-Me, Babysitter's Club, C. S. Lewis).

Yet, throughout elementary school, the rest of my room was always a total wreck. I'd lose game pieces, toys, and friends' phone numbers all the time. I'd often forget to do my homework, or was unable to find it in the piles of my room. Sometimes I'd even lose clothing — I can't tell you how many mornings I could come up with only one sneaker — or couldn't put my hands on my backpack. I thought that this was just the way things were and, as a result, never bothered to try to change.

It wasn't until I entered junior high school that I felt the need to do something about the chaos. At the time, school was not my top priority: dance and my social life came first. So I focused my organizing efforts on my areas of interest. I began by separating my dance clothes into a drawer and putting my dance shoes in boxes. I created a file for all my forms and dance information. To keep track of all my friends' phone numbers, I wrote each person's name and number on a color-coded Post-it, depending on where I'd first met them (junior high school, elementary school, dance school, or camp). I tacked these Post-its on the wall in four clusters. From then on, I could find any phone number at a glance and track how well I was balancing my time between my various social groups. And I always knew where my dance stuff was.

In high school, I began to understand the importance of doing well in classes and decided to get that part of my life under control as well. My schedule had begun to intensify, and I decided that if I wanted to do my best at school and still find time for the things I enjoyed the most, I'd have to quit worrying about being too much like my mom or what others thought.

I organized my school papers into a series of binders so that I'd always know what I needed and when. Then I created a matching filing system at home. At the end of each semester, I emptied the binders into the folders and started out fresh. This way I had a logical place for my work all year long. I also began using a planner and a schedule on my computer to carefully structure my days to make the most of them, planning time for my homework, my dance classes, and all my other activities. I got a shelf and drawers for my locker, so that instead of just throwing everything into a big pile, I could make better use of the space and locate anything I needed quickly.

Today, after years of staying organized, I am happy to report that I have succeeded in creating an effective system. But what's most important is that it's my own system — not one that my mother, or anyone else for that matter, tried to force on me. That's why it works. And that's what this book will do for you. It won't tell you how to run your life, where exactly to place each hook on the wall, or which classes to take to make your life easier. But it will help you figure out a way to turn over a new leaf and make the most of your space as well as your time.

I can't promise that you're going to get everything done and still get ten hours of sleep at night. What I can promise you, however, is that at the end of this process you'll be able to increase and make the most out of your free time. You'll be amazed how much time is gained when you don't have to search for your stuff, or when you know exactly what your plans are ahead of time. We all know that we're living in a crazy world that demands a lot from us. The organizing process is very grounding. It's a great way to gain control of your life and world.

Getting organized does not mean becoming neat or cleaning up. You may be looking around your room right now and seeing some- thing that looks like a disaster area, and yet you may still be perfectly on top of things. In Chapter 1, you'll find a self-assessment that will help you figure out if you are in fact already organized. Organizing is not about how things look; it's about knowing where your stuff is, keeping your schedule together, and making your space and time work for you.

We're all organized in one way or another, whether we know it or not. It may be something as seemingly insignificant as the way you get your math homework done or how you arrange your books. But if it works for you, that's a start. The next step is figuring out what makes your organized areas so effective and applying that approach to the less organized parts of your life. Don't think that you'll never be able to pull it all together. Anyone can be organized; it's not an inborn talent. It's a skill that can be learned.

Copyright © 2002 Julie Morgenstern and Jessi Morgenstern-Colón

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