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Origami Sailboats

Origami Sailboats

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by Lew Rozelle
     
 

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A Complete Guide to Folding, Floating, and Functional Origami Sailboats

These boats don't just look nice on a shelf--they're made to move! Lew Rozelle has created original designs for paper sailboats that actually float and sail in water. His designs are based on traditional Japanses models, but Lew's boats do not have to be folded and then

Overview

A Complete Guide to Folding, Floating, and Functional Origami Sailboats

These boats don't just look nice on a shelf--they're made to move! Lew Rozelle has created original designs for paper sailboats that actually float and sail in water. His designs are based on traditional Japanses models, but Lew's boats do not have to be folded and then turned inside out. The traditional step is difficult and can frequently result in ripping the paper. Traditional Japanese models are also unable to trap the wind and move on their own. But all of the models in Origami Sailboats catch wind currents, float and retain their shape in water. Believe it or not, these paper boats hold up in water for several hours, or even several days if they're made from freezer paper or wax paper. This is a great activity for parents and children, novices and accomplished folders alike. If you like paper airplanes or origami rockets, you'll love Origami Sailboats.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Everyone remembers the folded newspaper boat definitely not a seaworthy craft. Origami expert Rozelle (Origami Ornaments) designs and sails folded paper boats based on Japanese traditional techniques and his own modifications. This book contains illustrations and step-by-step instructions for basic folds, sailboat parts, and several types of boats. The sail is an integral part created by the folds, and if waterproof paper is used the boat will sail on pond or pool. This is a useful addition to public library crafts or children's collections. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781429963190
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
02/09/2002
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
176
File size:
7 MB

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Origami Sailboats


By Lew Rozelle

St. Martin's Press

Copyright © 2002 Lew Rozelle
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4299-6319-0



CHAPTER 1

Learning the Folds

Work through the models in order from beginning to end.

International symbols for folding paper

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]


Symbols

The symbols used in origami are shown at the left. They are the international language of the origami world.

A series of dashes represents a valley fold. Make a concave crease where this line appears.

A series of dots and dashes represents a mountain fold. Make a convex crease wherever this line appears.


Arrows show the directions in which you make the fold: left, right, up, down, in front, behind, and into. These directions refer to the page itself. "Fold upward" means fold toward the top of the page. "Near" is closest to you. "Far" or "behind" is away from you.


Following Directions

First, read the written instructions. "Valley-fold" tells you to make a valley fold. "Repeat steps 3 through 5" gives you instructions which would be difficult to convey in a drawing.

Second, look at the accompanying drawing. The drawing will show you how the model should look as each step in the folding sequence takes place. The arrows will also help you see where to make a fold.

Third, always look ahead to the next drawing to see how the model should look after a fold is made. This will also show you when you have made a mistake. You should go on folding only after you have completed the step successfully.


Procedures

There are several combinations of folds, which when combined produce a desired effect. "Reverse-fold" is a procedure which has several folding steps. These will be explained in the next few pages, before you begin folding. Remember to make each fold as precise as you can. Work through the models in order from beginning to end.


Basic Folding

Valley Fold

Begin with a square sheet of paper. Valley-fold along the diagonal.

Unfold

Each of the drawings in this book is part of a folding sequence. Each drawing is accompanied by a small boat-hook containing its number. Carefully follow each step in turn until you have completed a model. The drawing at the left shows a simple valley fold. Notice that the square is shaded: this indicates that the colored side of the paper is facing you. The dashed line shows where the fold takes place. The paper is folded in front creating a valley. Try to be as precise as you can so that the edges of the paper are aligned with each other while the crease is formed.


Mountain Fold

Begin with a square sheet of paper. Mountain-fold along the diagonal.

Valley-fold the top point down to the lower right corner and unfold.

The mountain fold is indicated by a different type of line and arrow. The paper is folded behind. (The drawings do not always show the result with photographic accuracy. This freedom in drawing allows you to see where the paper has gone after the fold. In reality you would not be able to see the back edges of the paper in step 4.) Step 3 tells you to mountain-fold the paper and shows where to make the crease. Step 4 tells you to make a valley fold and to unfold it. The double arrow shows that you are to fold and unfold.


Reverse Fold

Reverse-fold the top corner of the paper.

Step 6 shows the reverse fold in progress.

Step 5 shows to where to make a mountain fold on the near layer and a valley fold on the far layer This will allow you to reverse-fold the right corner. The black triangle indicates a reverse fold, so called because the diagonal folded edge — the spine, so to speak — reverses itself, changing from convex to concave. You are going to open up the corner and push the upper corner down into the model, between the front and back layers. Step 6 shows this procedure in progress.

Repeat step 5 on the left corner.

Both reverse folds are now completed.

Step 7 shows the completion of step 6, and tells you to repeat this process on the left corner.


Rabbit Ear

Valley-fold the near flap diagonally in half and unfold.

Valley-fold the right edge of the near flap to the diagonal crease formed in step 9.

Valley-fold the near bottom edge up to the crease made in step 9.

Pull out the flap hidden between the two near layers.

Steps 9 through 13 explain how to make a rabbit ear. Step 9 tells you to valley-fold the near right corner to the upper left point and then unfold. This will leave a crease. Step 10 tells you to fold the near bottom edge of the paper up to the crease formed in step 9. Simply align the edge with the crease and press flat. Step 11 tells you to fold the right edge of the near flap to the diagonal crease line. Step 12 tells you to pull out the tiny flap hidden behind the nearest layer of paper Do not unfold steps 10 — 11. The flap is reversed outward from within the construction.

The completed rabbit ear.

Rabbit-ear the near flap as shown.

Step 13 shows the completed folds. Step 14 tells you to form a rabbit ear on the near flap. This is how steps 10 through 12 will appear in the book.


Squash Fold

Enlarged view of step 13. Mountain- and valley-fold the tiny flap as shown.

The squash fold is shown here in progress.

The completed squash fold.

Squash-fold the tiny flap as shown.

Steps 15 through 18 illustrate a squash fold. Step 15 tells where to make a valley and mountain fold. In step 16 simply lift up the center flap and open it. Press down on the flap and (squash) the flap flat. Step 18 shows how the squash fold is illustrated in one step.


Boat Fold

Begin with a square sheet of paper. Valley-fold upward in half.

Valley-fold only the near layer in half, downward.

Valley-fold diagonally in half and unfold. Don't let the layers slide apart!

Repeat step 3 along the opposite diagonal. Don't let the layers slide apart!

Valley-fold the bottom edges up to the central folded edge and unfold.

Valley-fold the near left corner down along the crease formed in step 4.

Valley-fold the near right corner down along the crease formed in step 3.

Valley-fold the lower portion of the model up along the crease formed in step 5.

Unfold completely.

Valley-fold upward the three lowest horizontal segments.

Valley-fold the near layer down along the indicated existing crease.

Enlarged View. Pull point C clockwise downward. Corner M will begin to rise along the diagonal crease formed in step 4. As M rises toward N and the model is flattened, mountain fold AC will form itself. Repeat on the right, pulling point D counterclockwise. Watch the spots marked X. Watch the black dots.

Step 13 shows these folds in progress. Swing the bottom upward and flatten the model to begin formation of the hull.

The moutain and valley folds in step 12 make up the Boat Fold.

Steps 1 through 11 form creases that prepare a Boat Fold. Step 12 shows the Boat Fold notation. The configuration remains exactly the same for all the boats. The following two boats will allow you to practice this fold.


Traditional Boat

(Traditional Fold)

Begin by valley-folding a square in half. Unfold.

Valley-fold the top and bottom edges to the centerline.

Valley-fold all four corners to the centerline.

Valley-fold the top and bottom left corners to the centerline.

Repeat step 4 on the top and bottom right corners.

Valley-fold the top and bottom points to the centerline.

Open the central horizontal raw edges and turn the model inside out; after you open the central slit, push at the black arrowheads to invert the corners. Look ahead to steps 8 and 9, and be careful not to tear the paper.

Steps 8 and 9 show this procedure in progress. Rotate the model to the position shown in step 9.

Place your thumbs on the inside edges and hold your index fingers on the corners at the back; gently press the corners toward yourself until they pop into a shape that is convex from your point of view. Repeat this process on the lower half to turn the model completely inside out. Don't worry if the bow and stern tend to tear on your first few attempts! You may want to try the tough paper of a brown grocery bag.

The completed Traditional Boat.


Double-Ended Boat

Begin this second boat by folding a square in half. Unfold.

Valley-fold the top and bottom edges to the center and turn the model over.

Valley-fold the top and bottom edges to the center.

Swing the raw edges out from behind.

Valley-fold the model in half along both diagonals and unfold.

Mountain- and valley-fold the bottom half of the model using the Boat Fold configuration. Watch the black dots.

Step 7 shows the Boat Fold in progress. Watch the black dots.

Flatten the boat.

Valley-fold the triangular flaps in half and then valley-fold them again, tucking them down into the hull of the boat.

Repeat steps 6 through 9 on the top half of the model.

Open the sides of the boat. Do not turn the model inside out.

The simple Double-Ended Boat will float. We have duplicated the structure of the Traditional Boat without the inside-out procedure.


Boat

Begin with a step 5 of the Double-Ended Boat (page 10). Valley-fold and unfold the diagonals. Turn the model over.

Valley-fold the near right corners to the centerline and unfold.

Valley-fold the right end of the model as shown. Unfold.

Reverse-fold the two triangular flaps into the model along the creases formed in step 2.

Turn the model over from top to bottom.

Valley-fold the near right layers leftward along the crease formed in step 3.

Boat-fold the bottom left side by mountain- and valley-folding the near layers as shown. Watch the black dot.

Step 8 shows this fold in progress. Watch the black dot.

Continue until the bottom raw edge aligns with the horizontal centerline, and then flatten the model. Watch the black dot.

Valley-fold the inner triangular flap down to the raw edge, and then fold it again, tucking it down into the hull. Note corner Z.

Tuck corner Z into the pocket behind it. Repeat steps 7 through 11 on the top half of the boat.

Open the sides of the boat without turning the model inside out. Square the stern by pinching its corners into the mountain folds indicated.

The simple Boat has a flat stern called a transom.


Sailboat Base

Begin to accordion-fold the paper by valley-folding along the diagonal; unfold.

Valley-fold along the other diagonal and unfold. Turn over.

Valley-fold the top and bottom points to the center and unfold.

Valley-fold the top and bottom points to the crease made in step 3 and unfold.

Valley-fold the top and bottom corners over the centerline to the crease formed in step 3 and unfold. Turn the model over.

Valley-fold the top and bottom corners to the crease formed in step 4 and unfold.

Valley-fold the top and bottom corners to the crease formed in step 5 and unfold. Turn the model over.

Valley-fold the side corners to the center.

Valley-fold the inside corners to the outer edges.

Turn the model over.

Valley-fold the top point down along the crease formed in step 6.

Valley-fold the near point up along the crease formed in step 5.

Repeat steps 11 and 12 on the bottom half of the model.

Valley-fold the top right edge down to the crease formed in step 3.

Valley-fold the top left edge down to the crease formed in step 3.

Valley-fold the top down along the crease formed in step 3.

Valley-fold as indicated. Then repeat steps 15 and 16 on the bottom of the model.

Enlarged view. Valley-fold the upper and lower edges to the centerline and unfold. Don't let the layers slide apart! Turn the Sailboat Base over.

The two nearest pointed colored flaps at left and right will later form the sail and rudder.

The Sailboat Base is a physical structure, a starting point that will be used again and again in this book. The Boat Fold, on the other hand, is a procedure. Make a sample of the Sailboat Base, label it, and keep it with this book for reference. And, looking ahead, fold an extra copy of step 9 on page 22 (the Sailboat Base boat-folded), label it as the Boat Fold, and keep it with the basic Sailboat Base.


Sailboat Part Names

It will help to learn some of the terms used in sailing. Unlike actual sailboats, these origami sailboats have their sails on the bow rather than in the middle or amidship. All of these origami sailboats are flat-bottom boats and will actually sail on any body of water.


Sailboat

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Origami Sailboat

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]


The forward part of the sailboat is called the Bow.

The back part of the sailboat is the Stern.

CHAPTER 2

Basic Sailboat Parts

How to fold the Hull

Rowboat

Lifeboat


How to fold the Sail

Ship's Boat

Sailing Lifeboat


How to fold the Rudder

Sailboat

Double-Ended Sailboat


Rowboat

Begin with a Sailboat Base (page 14). Valley-fold the top and bottom left side of the model along the folded edges of the near flaps from the corners all the way to the centerline and unfold. This begins to form the bow of the Rowboat. Turn the model over top to bottom.

The creases formed in step 1 will still be on the left. Valley-fold the right near corners to the centerline and unfold.

Reverse-fold the near right central corners into the model.

Tuck in the near right flap (a single-layer triangle). You will have to open the model slightly to accomplish this.

Valley-fold and unfold the right side of the model along the crease formed in step 4. Turn the model over top to bottom.

The creases formed in step 1 remain on the left. Valley-fold the bottom right edge leftward along the crease formed in step 5. A triangular collar will form itself.

Repeat step 6 at the top.

Mountain- and valley-fold the bottom left side into the Boat Fold configuration. The bottom edge will rise to form the side of the boat. Watch the black dot.

Valley-fold downward the triangular flap formed in step 8.

Repeat step 8 on the top half of the model. Watch the black dot.

Valley-fold the near flap in half as shown.

Tuck the newly formed flap up into the model.

Lift the near flap upward.

Valley-fold the near flap in half and then tuck it down into the model.

Tuck the inner right corners into the triangular pockets that lie behind them.

Open out the model and square off the transom.

Side view of the Rowboat.

When you begin to add sails, the sail will be incorporated into the folding of the hull.


Lifeboat

Begin with a Sailboat Base (page 14). Valley-fold all layers diagonally along the folded edge as shown and unfold.

Repeat step 1 at the upper right.

Repeat steps 1 and 2 at the bottom.

Boat-fold the left portion of the bottom flap. Watch the black dot.

Step 5 shows this procedure in progress. Watch the black dot.

Repeat step 4 on the right bottom half of the model. Watch the black dot.

Flatten the white inner flaps and bring the near side of the hull upward around them. Flatten the model.

Valley-fold the near triangular flaps down over the hull.

Repeat steps 4 through 7 on the upper half of the model.

Valley-fold the near flaps in half as shown.

Tuck the newly formed flaps up into the hull.

Valley-fold the near flaps upward.

Repeat steps 10 and 11.

Valley-fold and unfold the left and right points as shown.

Grasp the edges of the near and inside flaps and open up the lifeboat. Form the hull as shown in steps 16 and 17.

Grasp the sides of the hull and valley-fold the model between the corners and unfold. Repeat at the bottom.

Inside view of the Lifeboat. The innermost flaps are shown flattened onto the hull. Lift them up to lie against the hull. The actions of step 16 allow the boat to remain open.

Side view of the Lifeboat.


Ship's Boat

Begin with a Sailboat Base (page 14). Grasp the top and bottom folded edges and pull the top edge upward.

Turn the model over left to right.

Open the near left flap completely. Valley-fold and unfold the right edge.

Turn the model over top to bottom.

Refold the horizontal valley and mountain folds so that the model looks like step 6.

Valley-fold and unfold all layers of the top and bottom left flaps along the near folded edges. This left end will ultimately form the bow of the boat. Turn the model over.

Valley-fold the near right central corners to the centerline, and unfold. Then reverse- fold the corners into the model.

Tuck in the single-layer triangle. You will have to open the model slightly to accomplish this.

Valley-fold and unfold the right side of the model along the edge of the tucked-in flap from step 8. Turn the model over.

Enlarged view. Valley-fold the bottom right edge leftward along the crease formed in step 9. A triangular collar will form itself.

Repeat step 10 at the top.

Boat-fold the bottom left flap using the same method used for step 8 of the Rowboat (page 21). As you pull the white edge down clockwise and begin to form the near side of the boat, the black-dotted flap will start to rise to form the sail. Flatten the model, and watch the black dot.

Swing the left near flap — the sail — down along the centerline, opening the sail partway. Repeat step 12 on the top. Although the flap is larger than that of the Rowboat, the folding remains the same. Flatten the sail downward.

Swivel the near portion of the sail up into the model. This will form the near half of the sail.

Valley-fold the sail upward and repeat the tucking-in of step 14. Flatten the sail downward.

Tuck the inner right corners into the triangular pockets that lie behind them.

Open sides of the boat. Rotate the model so that the sail points toward the top.

Grasp the sides of the hull and valley-fold its sail-end downward between the corners. Unfold. This process will allow the boat to remain open.

Grasp the sides of the sail, and valley-fold it downward; then allow the sail to open itself upward again. Square the transom as in step 16 of the Rowboat.

Rowboat

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Ship's Boat

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The folding of the hull for the Rowboat and the hull for the Ship's Boat remains the same. A simple sail has been formed by bringing up a large triangular flap. This boat will sail very well but may tend to wander from a straight course.


Sailing Lifeboat

Begin with a Sailboat Base (page 14). Grasp the top and bottom folded edges and pull the top edge upward.

Turn the model over left to right.

Open the near left flap completely.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Origami Sailboats by Lew Rozelle. Copyright © 2002 Lew Rozelle. Excerpted by permission of St. Martin's Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Lew Rozelle began folding paper at the age of nine and has been designing his own origami models since the 1960s. Origami Sailboats is his fourth book, following Origami in King Arthur's Court, Origami Rockets, and Origami Ornaments.


Lew Rozelle began folding paper at the age of nine and has been designing his own origami models since the 1960s. He is the author of several books on origami, including Origami Sailboats, Origami Rockets, and Origami Ornaments.

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