The Origin of Species / Edition 1

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Overview

Since its publication in 1859, The Origin of Species has been the focal point of debate. Darwin's analysis of flora and fauna calls into question the long-held concepts of spontaneous generation, divine creation, and the unrelatedness of many species. Instead, he argues for Natural Selection: species survive and evolve in response to environmental conditions and other circumstances through a process in which those creatures and plants with stronger, more enduring characteristics live to beget more adaptable offspring. It was Darwin's research aboard the H.M.S. Beagle that led to the clash of intellectual titans - religion and science - over the true nature of humankind. Here is the book that started one of the greatest debates of the Western world.

The famous classic on evolution that revolutionized the course of science. Darwin's theory that species derive from other species by a gradual evolutionary process and that the average age level of each species is heightened by the "survival of the fittest" stirred popular debate of his time to a fever pitch. "Next to the Bible, no work has been quite as influential."--Ashley Montagu.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal

Amazingly, 150 years after the publication of The Origin of Species, Darwin's seminal work on the theory of evolution remains the authoritative tract on the subject. Veteran narrator David Case (The Hunchback of Notre Dame) provides an authentic English accent that suits the material well; his diction is precise, making his narration easy to follow. Though this title has previously been recorded on audio, Tantor Media's addition of a full-text PDF ebook is a tremendous enhancement. Highly recommended for all collections.
—Gloria Maxwell

Victorian Studies
“A masterful condensation.”
From the Publisher
"Veteran narrator David Case...provides an authentic English accent that suits the material well; his diction is precise, making his narration easy to follow." —-Library Journal Starred Audio Review
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780879756758
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books
  • Publication date: 5/28/1991
  • Series: Great Minds Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 434
  • Product dimensions: 5.47 (w) x 8.47 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Charles Darwin

Naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882) is the father of evolution. His groundbreaking The Origin of Species argued that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors, and proposed the scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection. As much as anyone in the modern era, Darwin has changed the course of human thought.

Philip Appleman is Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Indiana University, where he was a founding editor of Victorian Studies. He is the author of a book on overpopulation, The Silent Explosion and coeditor of 1859: Entering an Age of Crisis. He has also published three novels and several volumes of poetry.

Philip Appleman is Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Indiana University, where he was a founding editor of Victorian Studies. He is the author of a book on overpopulation, The Silent Explosion and coeditor of 1859: Entering an Age of Crisis. He has also published three novels and several volumes of poetry.

Philip Appleman is Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Indiana University, where he was a founding editor of Victorian Studies. He is the author of a book on overpopulation, The Silent Explosion and coeditor of 1859: Entering an Age of Crisis. He has also published three novels and several volumes of poetry.

Biography

Robert Charles Darwin was born in Shrewsbury, England, on February 12, 1809, into a wealthy and highly respected family. His grandfather, Erasmus Darwin, was a doctor and the author of many works, including his well-known Zoonomia, or the Laws of Organic Life, which suggested a theory of evolution. Charles's father, Robert Waring Darwin, was also a prosperous doctor; his mother, Susannah, was the daughter of Josiah Wedgwood, founder of the renowned Wedgwood potteries. The Darwins and the Wedgwoods had close and long-standing relations, and Charles was to marry his cousin, Emma Wedgwood.

In 1825 at age sixteen, Darwin matriculated at Edinburgh University to study medicine. There, his early interest in natural history developed, and he studied particularly crustaceans, sea creatures, and beetles. Nauseated by the sight of blood, however, he decided that medicine was not his vocation, left Edinburgh in 1827 and entered Christ's College, Cambridge University, with no clear sense of possible vocation, theology itself being an option. At Cambridge he became friends with J. S. Henslow, a clergyman who was also professor of botany. Although Darwin was to graduate from Cambridge with a B.A. in theology, he spent much time with Henslow, developing his interest in natural science. It was Henslow who secured a position for Darwin on an exploratory expedition aboard the HMS Beagle.

In December 1831, the year he graduated from Cambridge, Darwin embarked upon a five-year voyage to Africa and South America, acting as a companion to the captain, Robert Fitzroy. Darwin spent more time in land expeditions than at sea, where he was always seasick, but during the long voyages he continued his collecting and, cramped in his tiny cabin, meticulously wrote up his ideas. Several years after his return, at the time of the birth of his first son, William, Darwin fell ill. It is conjectured that while in South America he had contracted Chagas's disease, but whatever the cause, the effects were debilitating for the rest of Darwin's life.

By the time he returned to London in 1835, many of his letters, some to scientists like Charles Lyell and Adam Sedgwick, had been read before scientific societies, and he was already a well known and respected naturalist. His first published book, an account of his voyage aboard the Beagle, entitled Journal of Researches, appeared in 1839 and was widely popular. He married the same year; soon after, the family moved from London to a secluded house at Down, in Kent, where Darwin wrote initial sketches of his theory and then preparing himself for the full exposition, spent eight years writing a detailed set of definitive monographs on barnacles.

In 1858, when Darwin was halfway through writing his book, "Natural Selection," A. R. Wallace sent him a paper called, "On the Tendency of Varieties to Depart Indefinitely from the Original Type." In language similar to Darwin's own, Wallace laid out the argument for natural selection. Wallace asked Darwin to help get the paper published -- obviously an alarming development for a man who had given twenty years of his life to getting the argument for natural selection right. Darwin's scientific friends advised him to gather materials giving evidence of his priority but to have the Wallace paper read before the Linnaean Society, along with a brief account of his own ideas. Immediately after the reading, Darwin began work on his "abstract" of "Natural Selection." The result was On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, published in 1859. Despite the controversy it generated, it was an immense success and went through five more editions in Darwin's lifetime.

Darwin devoted the rest of his life to researching and writing scientific treatises, drawing on his notebooks and corresponding with scientists all over the world, and thus developing and modifying parts of his larger argument.

Darwin never traveled again and much of his scientific work was done in his own garden and study at home. Others, particularly his "bulldog," T. H. Huxley, fought the battle for evolution publicly, and as Darwin remained quietly ailing at home, his family grew -- he had ten children -- and so did his reputation. Although he was always ill with symptoms that made it impossible for him to work full days, he produced an enormous volume of work. His death, on April 19, 1882, was a national event. Despite the piety of his wife, Emma, Darwin had fallen away from religion as he reflected both on the way nature worked and on the way his favorite daughter, Annie, died painfully from an unknown feverish illness, when she was ten. Nevertheless, ironically, he was buried in Westminster Abbey.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of The Origin of Species.

Good To Know

Darwin was born on the same day as U.S. president Abraham Lincoln.

He broke his longtime snuff habit by keeping his snuff box in the basement and the key to it in the attic.

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    1. Date of Birth:
      February 12, 1809
    2. Place of Birth:
      Shrewsbury, England
    1. Date of Death:
      April 19, 1882
    2. Place of Death:
      London, England
    1. Education:
      B.A. in Theology, Christ’s College, Cambridge University, 1831

Read an Excerpt

When we compare the individuals of the same variety or sub-variety of our older cultivated plants and animals, one of the first points which strikes us is, that they generally differ more from each other than do the individuals of any one species or variety in a state of nature. And if we reflect on the vast diversity of the plants and animals which have been cultivated, and which have varied during all ages under the most different climates and treatment, we are driven to conclude that this great variability is due to our domestic productions having been raised under conditions of life not so uniform as, and somewhat different from, those to which the parent species had been exposed under nature. There is, also, some probability in the view propounded by Andrew Knight, that this variability may be partly connected with excess of food. It seems clear that organic beings must be exposed during several generations to new conditions to cause any great amount of variation; and that, when the organisation has once begun to vary, it generally continues varying for many generations. No case is on record of a variable organism ceasing to vary under cultivation. Our oldest cultivated plants, such as wheat, still yield new varieties: our oldest domesticated animals are still capable of rapid improvement or modification.

As far as I am able to judge, after long attending to the subject, the conditions of life appear to act in two ways,--directly on the whole organisation or on certain parts alone, and indirectly by affecting the reproductive system. With respect to the direct action, we must bear in mind that in every case, as Professor Weismann has lately insisted, and as I haveincidentally shown in my work on 'Variation under Domestication,' there are two factors: namely, the nature of the organism, and the nature of the conditions. The former seems to be much the more important; for nearly similar variations sometimes arise under, as far as we can judge, dissimilar conditions; and, on the other hand, dissimilar variations arise under conditions which appear to be nearly uniform. The effects on the offspring are either definite or indefinite. They may be considered as definite when all or nearly all the offspring of individuals exposed to certain conditions during several generations are modified in the same manner. It is extremely difficult to come to any conclusion in regard to the extent of the changes which have been thus definitely induced. There can, however, be little doubt about many slight changes,--such as size from the amount of food, colour from the nature of the food, thickness of the skin and hair from climate, &c. Each of the endless variations which we see in the plumage of our fowls must have had some efficient cause; and if the same cause were to act uniformly during a long series of generations on many individuals, all probably would be modified in the same manner. Such facts as the complex and extraordinary out-growths which variably follow from the insertion of a minute drop of poison by a gall-producing insect, show us what singular modifications might result in the case of plants from a chemical change in the nature of the sap.

Indefinite variability is a much more common result of changed conditions than definite variability, and has probably played a more important part in the formation of our domestic races. We see indefinite variability in the endless slight peculiarities which distinguish the individuals of the same species, and which cannot be accounted for by inheritance from either parent or from some more remote ancestor. Even strongly marked differences occasionally appear in the young of the same litter, and in seedlings from the same seed-capsule. At long intervals of time, out of millions of individuals reared in the same country and fed on nearly the same food, deviations of structure so strongly pronounced as to deserve to be called monstrosities arise; but monstrosities cannot be separated by any distinct line from slighter variations. All such changes of structure, whether extremely slight or strongly marked, which appear amongst many individuals living together, may be considered as the indefinite effects of the conditions of life on each individual organism, in nearly the same manner as the chill affects different men in an indefinite manner, according to their state of body or constitution, causing coughs or colds, rheumatism, or inflammation of various organs.

With respect to what I have called the indirect action of changed conditions, namely, through the reproductive system of being affected, we may infer that variability is thus induced, partly from the fact of this system being extremely sensitive to any change in the conditions, and partly from the similarity, as Kolreuter and others have remarked, between the variability which follows from the crossing of distinct species, and that which may be observed with plants and animals when reared under new or unnatural conditions. Many facts clearly show how eminently susceptible the reproductive system is to very slight changes in the surrounding conditions. Nothing is more easy than to tame an animal, and few things more difficult than to get it to breed freely under confinement, even when the male and female unite. How many animals there are which will not breed, though kept in an almost free state in their native country! This is generally, but erroneously, attributed to vitiated instincts. Many cultivated plants display the utmost vigour, and yet rarely or never seed! In some few cases it has been discovered that a very trifling change, such as a little more or less water at some particular period of growth, will determine whether or not a plant will produce seeds. I cannot here give the details which I have collected and elsewhere published on this curious subject; but to show how singular the laws are which determine the reproduction of animals under confinement, I may mention that carnivorous animals, even from the tropics, breed in this country pretty freely under confinement, with the exception of the plantigrades or bear family, which seldom produce young; whereas carnivorous birds, with the rarest exceptions, hardly ever lay fertile eggs. Many exotic plants have pollen utterly worthless, in the same condition as in the most sterile hybrids. When, on the one hand, we see domesticated animals and plants, though often weak and sickly, breeding freely under confinement; and when, on the other hand, we see individuals, though taken young from a state of nature perfectly tamed, long-lived and healthy (of which I could give numerous instances), yet having their reproductive system so seriously affected by unperceived causes as to fail to act, we need not be surprised at this system, when it does act under confinement, acting irregularly, and producing offspring somewhat unlike their parents. I may add, that as some organisms breed freely under the most unnatural conditions (for instance, rabbits and ferrets kept in hutches), showing that their reproductive organs are not easily affected; so will some animals and plants withstand domestication or cultivation, and vary very slightly--perhaps hardly more than in a state of nature.

Some naturalists have maintained that all variations are connected with the act of sexual reproduction; but this is certainly an error; for I have given in another work a long list of 'sporting plants,' as they are called by gardeners;--that is, of plants which have suddenly produced a single bud with a new and sometimes widely different character from that of the other buds on the same plant. These bud variations, as they may be named, can be propagated by grafts, offsets, &c., and sometimes by seed. They occur rarely under nature, but are far from rare under culture. As a single bud out of the many thousands, produced year after year on the same tree under uniform conditions, has been known suddenly to assume a new character; and as buds on distinct trees, growing under different conditions, have sometimes yielded nearly the same variety--for instance, buds on peach-trees producing nectarines, and buds on common roses producing moss-roses--we clearly see that the nature of the conditions is of subordinate importance in comparison with the nature of the organism in determining each particular form of variation;--perhaps of not more importance than the nature of the spark, by which a mass of combustible matter is ignited, has in determining the nature of the flames.


Effects of Habit and of the Use or Disuse of Parts; Correlated Variation; Inheritance


Changed habits produce an inherited effect, as in the period of the flowering of plants when transported from one climate to another. With animals the increased use or disuse of parts has had a more marked influence; thus I find in the domestic duck that the bones of the wing weigh less and the bones of the leg more, in proportion to the whole skeleton, than do the same bones in the wild-duck; and this change may be safely attributed to the domestic duck flying much less, and walking more, than its wild parents. The great and inherited development of the udders in cows and goats in countries where they are habitually milked, in comparison with these organs in other countries, is probably another instance of the effects of use. Not one of our domestic animals can be named which has not in some country drooping ears; and the view which has been suggested that the drooping is due to disuse of the muscles of the ear, from the animals being seldom much alarmed, seems probable.

Many laws regulate variation, some few of which can be dimly seen, and will hereafter be briefly discussed. I will here only allude to what may be called correlated variation. Important changes in the embryo or larva will probably entail changes in the mature animal. In monstrosities, the correlations between quite distinct parts are very curious; and many instances are given in Isidore Geoffroy St. Hilaire's great work on this subject. Breeders believe that long limbs are almost always accompanied by an elongated head. Some instances of correlation are quite whimsical: thus cats which are entirely white and have blue eyes are generally deaf; but it has been lately stated by Mr. Tait that this is confined to the males. Colour and constitutional peculiarities go together, of which many remarkable cases could be given amongst animals and plants. From facts collected by Heusinger, it appears that white sheep and pigs are injured by certain plants, whilst dark-coloured individuals escape: Professor Wyman has recently communicated to me a good illustration of this fact; on asking some farmers in Virginia how it was that all their pigs were black, they informed him that the pigs ate the paint-root (Lachnanthes), which coloured their bones pink, and which caused the hoofs of all but the black varieties to drop off; and one of the 'crackers' (i.e. Virginia squatters) added, 'we select the black members of a litter for raising, as they alone have a good chance of living.' Hairless dogs have imperfect teeth; long-haired and coarse-haired animals are apt to have, as is asserted, long or many horns: pigeons with feathered feet have skin between their outer toes; pigeons with short beaks have small feet, and those with long beaks large feet. Hence if man goes on selecting, and thus augmenting, any peculiarity, he will almost certainly modify unintentionally other parts of the structure, owing to the mysterious laws of correlation.

The results of the various, unknown, or but dimly understood laws of variation are infinitely complex and diversified. It is well worth while carefully to study the several treatises on some of our old cultivated plants, as on the hyacinth, potato, even the dahlia, &c.; and it is really surprising to note the endless points of structure and constitution in which the varieties and sub-varieties differ slightly from each other. The whole organisation seems to have become plastic, and departs in a slight degree from that of the parental type.
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Table of Contents

Additions and Corrections, to the Sixth Edition xv
Historical Sketch xviii
Introduction 1
Chapter I. Variation under Domestication 7
Chapter II. Variation under Nature 51
Chapter III. Struggle for Existence 75
Chapter IV. Natural Selection; or the Survival of the Fittest 97
Chapter V. Laws of Variation 164
Chapter VI. Difficulties of the Theory 207
Chapter VII. Miscellaneous Objections to the Theory of Natural Selection 262
Chapter VIII. Instinct 319
Chapter IX. Hybridism 365
Chapter X. On the Imperfection of the Geological Record 412
Chapter XI. On the Geological Succession of Organic Beings 453
Chapter XII. Geographical Distribution 493
Chapter XIII. Geographical Distribution--continued 535
Chapter XIV. Mutual Affinities of Organic Beings: Morphology: Embryology: Rudimentary Organs 566
Chapter XV. Recapitulation and Conclusion 631
Glossary of Scientific Terms 671
Index 687
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Customer Reviews

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 100 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2006

    The first Origin is the best Origin

    Darwin's Origin of Species needs no critical review in a forum like this. However, students of Darwinian evolutionary thought should take notice of this $6 clothbound hard cover edition. This is, as far as I can tell, the original 1859 first edition of the Origin. It is also a handy size, perfect for reading in bed, on a plane or on the beach. Why would you want a copy of the 1st edition rather than the author's own later revised editions? Because the 1st is the most honest, naive, and straightforward statement of Darwin's ideas, undiluted by later defensive responses to the heavy criticism of his contemporaries. The 1st edition contains the passage about the bear as ancestor to the whale, which he removed from all later editions because it was a point of scorn and ridicule from the scientific community of the day. Obviously he was wrong in detail (whales evolved from a carnivorous common ancestor with cows, not bears), but as the fossils of Pakistan show, he was precisely right in the broad idea of macroevolutionary change, which was really his point anyway. Another notable difference between the 1st and later editions of The Origin is the term 'survival of the fittest.' Darwin didn't coin the phrase, nor did he use it in the 1st edition, though he added it to later editions. In fact, it was invented by Herbert Spencer in reference to his atrocious ideas of Social Darwinism. And like a weak pawn on a chessboard, the phrase has been the subject of repeated attacks by creationsists for many years (the implication being that it is a circular argument). Though Spencer's arguments may have been circular, Darwin's never are. Nevertheless, the book probably reads better without the reference. There are several nice new omnibus editions of Darwin's important works edited by great modern scientists. I don't know whether those editors chose the 1st edition or not. In any case those are large expensive copies of the book, possibly better suited for library shelves than for sitting down and reading. If you want a copy to read, this Barnes & Noble edition is a great one, especially considering that a mass market paperback costs about 3 dollars more than this edition!

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2002

    Vituperatous Brood

    For those of us Christians who would condem this theory, open your minds to the possibilities of the descriptive power of science. For those of us scientists who would otherwise berate or belittle creationism, remember that they are your brothers and believe that 'What now is has already been, what is to be already is; and God restores what would otherwise be displaced.' (Ecclesiastes 3:15) For both, put down your weapons you vituperatous brood and seek the truth without malice or ego.

    5 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 6, 2010

    It's a Classic

    This is an awesome book for anyone interested in the origins of the current biological theories. It is well written and very convincing, and quite impressive, considering that it was written well before modern genetics provided such voluminous evidence for his conclusions.

    Have a wonderful day!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2003

    This Book Is Great and Informational

    Thhe Origin of Species is a great book. I am 12 years old and i thought it was a great book. It is a best buy for any person.

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2003

    A must read

    First off i didn't read this edition of the book I read 'Origin of Species' a Facsimilie of the original edition. By Charles Darwin which is basically the same book except it is completely unaltered from the original edition. It is an excelent book and gives proof beyond any reasonable doubt that evolution is a fact. But nowhere in this book by Darwin does it say anywhere that Man came from apes. Though the entire theory of evolution suggests it, it isn't anywhere in this book.That information is in another book by Charles Darwin called 'The Descent of man' which mainly deals with sexual selection. What is in the book is a spectactularly written step by step play by play look at why he and his coleagues were lead to believe beyond any doubt that evolution really is the mechanism which nature uses to create new species and get rid of other ones. Darwin gives countless examples from species around the world and explains the overwhelming evidence in support of his theory. The detail given by Darwin far exceeds any found in any text book anywhere on the subject. This is the single best book available anywhere in the world on the subject and a total must read. Some of his explanations are kind of long and the book can get overwhelming and boring from time to time but you have to keep in mind while reading it that it isn't just a book it is a complete scientific explanation of how evolution works , why it works, and the problems with it and other scientific theories. I don't think it was originally published for the layman to read. It is a true scientific work and should be read like one. If you plan on readling this book Plan on reading something that is like a 500 page scientific theory. Don't expect it to be really easy to read because it is not. You wouldn't read through 'Einsteins Theory of Relativity' by Max Borne in a few days and fully understand it. The same goes for this book. Evolution in general is fairly easy to understand in Highschool Biology class but they don't give the kind of detail that Darwin gives. keep that in mind when reading this book. It is fairly easy to understand if you take your time with it.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2012

    Zach says

    This book is slow to read, but very interesting. Darwin and his theory of evolution have been so currupted by modern teaching. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in the actual history and the original theory as it was first presented. Take your time and digest this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2012

    Science got love it

    Great piece of work and will give you a better understanding of natural selection. I have heard darwins name mentioned for years in school but they never tell what he said in his own words and how he said them.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2012

    Truth

    Charles darwin has even disproved his own theory. I dont understand how you beleive in this. But it is a well written book.

    2 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2003

    Charles, R. Darwin

    One of the great minds among Newton, and Einstein, that history has misbelieved and forgotten.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2002

    Shutting up creationists

    Maybe close-minded Christians will read this book, cease hiding hehind their gods' skirt, and LEARN SOMETHING FOR A CHANGE!

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 8, 2009

    Must read for anyone interested in the sciences.

    We all know who Darwin was, and many will quote this work without ever reading it in its entirety. I think that everyone should read this amazing book, and you may even gain a new perspective on the world around you.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 18, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    No Diverse Library is Complete Without it

    Not holding any theory of humanity's orgin as the literal truth I found this book to be an invaluable addition to my library. For those who like to combine matter with anti-matter place this next to the bible on your bookshelf. :)
    Well worth the price and a very interesting read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2009

    Perfect addition to your permanent library

    I bought this book to be used as reference material for my zoology paper. The observations of Charles Darwin have long been pilars of biology as we know it today.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 27, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    This book should be required reading.

    This Charles Darwin book written in the 1830's is one of the most relevant in mankind's history. It expounds the theory of Evolution which is the basis of life on planet Earth. Darwin's theories in the book pokes holes in Creationism without doubt.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2002

    great for science papers!

    I had to do a report on Darwin, and this really helped me understand the stuff he did.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2001

    Darwin from a College Student's View

    Darwin's Origin of Species is an excellent book. The ideas immersed within the text are essential to life today. But Darwin is dense and a horrible writer, so this book is a hard read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2000

    Charles Darwin, iconoclast and genius

    I consider Charles Darwin to be among the most important scientific thinkers in history. His theory set the stage for a revolution of thought, and more than a century of continually groundbreaking evidence and exciting revisions. Without Darwin, the majority of us might still be stuck in the primitive, ignorant belief in creationism.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2000

    awesome book on evalutoin

    origon of species is a great book on were species came from and how they evoleved into the present day creatures that you see today i recomend that all animal lovers and scientists,bioligists anone that studies or loves or wants to know about the evelution of animals should get this book

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2014

    Not a good copy

    The pages are all over the place. Some looked like a scanned copy and others looked like regular ebook.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    Meg

    She walked in and saw the bandoned camp.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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