The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State

The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State

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by Friedrich Engels
     
 

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The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State (1884), was a provocative and profoundly influential critique of the Victorian nuclear family. Engels argued that the traditional monogamous household was in fact a recent construct, closely bound up with capitalist societies. Under this patriarchal system, women were servants and, effectively, prostitutes.

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Overview

The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State (1884), was a provocative and profoundly influential critique of the Victorian nuclear family. Engels argued that the traditional monogamous household was in fact a recent construct, closely bound up with capitalist societies. Under this patriarchal system, women were servants and, effectively, prostitutes. Only Communism would herald the dawn of communal living and a new sexual freedom and, in turn, the role of the state would become superfluous.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780141191119
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/29/2010
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
470,756
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.70(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Friedrich Engels was born in 1820. In 1842 Engels went to Manchester to represent the family firm. Relationships there inspired the famous The Condition of the Working Class in England in 1844. Collaboration with Marx began in 1844 and in 1847 he composed the first drafts of the Manifesto. After Marx's death, he prepared the unfinished volumes of Capital for publication. He died in 1895. Dr Tristram Hunt is one of Britain's best known young historians. Educated at Cambridge and Chicago Universities, he is lecturer in British history at Queen Mary, University of London and author of several books. A leading historical broadcaster, he has authored numerous series for the BBC and Channel 4. A regular contributor to The Times, The Guardian and The Observer, he is a Trustee of the National Heritage Memorial Fund and Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

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Origin of the Family, Private Property, and the State 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
BobNY More than 1 year ago
When I was growing up Engels was a bad guy. He, along with Karl Marx, was honored on postage stamps of the German Democratic Republic in the same way that the Statue of Liberty and Lincoln were honored here. The Cold war is over and it's time to take a fresh view of things. This book is true to its title. It relies heavily on the work of Lewis Henry Morgan and others with regard to Iriquois and other "uncivilized" societies outside of Europe and on Tacitus and other classical writers with regard to Greeks, Romans, and northern Europeans. Engels was as subtle as his contemporary Nietzche, meaning he had a bold, forthright, no holds barred approach. He had the same reasoning as our own Ralph Nader, which is why I wonder how he got to his conclusions. Nevertheless what he brought to the reader's attention needs to be read and discussed again today. It would have been nice if the translator or the publisher added a bibliography, but you get what you pay for.