The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

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by Friedrich Engels
     
 

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Published in 1884, this is Engels’s classic treatise that traces human development from the time of primitive communities to a class society aimed at the protection of private property. Based in part on Marx’s notes to Lewis H. Morgan’s book Ancient Society, Engels’ work was deemed by Lenin as “one of the fundamental works

Overview


Published in 1884, this is Engels’s classic treatise that traces human development from the time of primitive communities to a class society aimed at the protection of private property. Based in part on Marx’s notes to Lewis H. Morgan’s book Ancient Society, Engels’ work was deemed by Lenin as “one of the fundamental works of modern socialism.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781411445864
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble
Publication date:
03/22/2011
Series:
Barnes & Noble Digital Library
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
228
File size:
296 KB

Meet the Author


Friedrich Engels (1820–1895) was a German Socialist and disciple of Karl Marx. After Engels wrote The Condition of the Working Class in England in 1844, he came into contact with Karl Marx, and together they collaborated on the dissemination of Communist thought, and on the writing of The Communist Manifesto (1848). He completed volumes 2 and 3 of Das Kapital after Marx’s death in 1883.

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Origin of the Family, Private Property, and the State 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
BobNY More than 1 year ago
When I was growing up Engels was a bad guy. He, along with Karl Marx, was honored on postage stamps of the German Democratic Republic in the same way that the Statue of Liberty and Lincoln were honored here. The Cold war is over and it's time to take a fresh view of things. This book is true to its title. It relies heavily on the work of Lewis Henry Morgan and others with regard to Iriquois and other "uncivilized" societies outside of Europe and on Tacitus and other classical writers with regard to Greeks, Romans, and northern Europeans. Engels was as subtle as his contemporary Nietzche, meaning he had a bold, forthright, no holds barred approach. He had the same reasoning as our own Ralph Nader, which is why I wonder how he got to his conclusions. Nevertheless what he brought to the reader's attention needs to be read and discussed again today. It would have been nice if the translator or the publisher added a bibliography, but you get what you pay for.