Origins and Revolutions: Human Identity in Earliest Prehistory

Origins and Revolutions: Human Identity in Earliest Prehistory

by Clive Gamble
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 0521860024

ISBN-13: 9780521860024

Pub. Date: 03/28/2007

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

In this study Clive Gamble presents and questions two of the most famous descriptions of change in prehistory. The first is the 'human revolution', when evidence for art, music, religion and language first appears. The second is the economic and social revolution of the Neolithic period. Gamble identifies the historical agendas behind 'origins research' and

Overview

In this study Clive Gamble presents and questions two of the most famous descriptions of change in prehistory. The first is the 'human revolution', when evidence for art, music, religion and language first appears. The second is the economic and social revolution of the Neolithic period. Gamble identifies the historical agendas behind 'origins research' and presents a bold alternative to these established frameworks, relating the study of change to the material basis of human identity. He examines, through artefact proxies, how changing identities can be understood using embodied material metaphors and in two major case-studies charts the prehistory of innovations, asking, did agriculture really change the social world? This is an important and challenging book that will be essential reading for every student and scholar of prehistory.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521860024
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
03/28/2007
Pages:
362
Product dimensions:
6.26(w) x 9.33(h) x 0.91(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments; Part I. Steps to the Present: Prologue: the longest of long revolutions; 1. The neolithic revolution; 2. The human revolution; 3. Metaphors for origins; Part II. The Material Basis of Identity: 4. Bodies, instruments and containers: 5. The accumulation and enchainment of identity; 6. Consuming and fragmenting people and things; Part III. Interpreting Change: 7. A prehistory of human thechnology: 3 million to 5000 thousand years ago; 8. Did agriculture change the world?; Epilogue: the good upheaval.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >