Origins and Spread of Domestic Animals in Southwest Asia and Europe

Overview

This volume tackles the fundamental and broad-scale questions concerning the spread of early animal herding from its origins in the Near East into Europe beginning in the mid-10th millennium BC. Original work by more than 30 leading international researchers synthesizes of our current knowledge about the origins and spread of animal domestication. In this comprehensive book, the zooarchaeological record and discussions of the evolution and development of Neolithic stock-keeping take center stage in the debate ...

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Overview

This volume tackles the fundamental and broad-scale questions concerning the spread of early animal herding from its origins in the Near East into Europe beginning in the mid-10th millennium BC. Original work by more than 30 leading international researchers synthesizes of our current knowledge about the origins and spread of animal domestication. In this comprehensive book, the zooarchaeological record and discussions of the evolution and development of Neolithic stock-keeping take center stage in the debate over the profound effects of the Neolithic revolution on both our biological and cultural evolution.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781611323221
  • Publisher: Left Coast Press
  • Publication date: 7/31/2013
  • Series: UNIV COL LONDON INST ARCH PUB Series, #59
  • Pages: 360
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Sue Colledge is a Research Associate at the University College London Institute of Archaeology. Her research focuses on the archaeobotany of early prehistoric sites in southwest Asia and Europe, particularly the management and use of plants prior to and following the inception of Neolithic farming. She is the co-editor (with James Conolly) of The Origins and Spread of Domestic Plants in Southwest Asia and Europe.

James Conolly is Canada Research Chair in Archaeology at Trent University, Canada. His research interests span archaeology and ecology, and he has published widely on the biogeography of early plant and animal domestication and on the application of spatial modelling and geographical information systems to archaeological and palaeoenvironmental datasets. He is the co-author (with Mark Lake) of Geographical Information Systems in Archaeology and the co-editor (with Sue Colledge) of The Origins and Spread of Domestic Plants in Southwest Asia and Europe. His current research focuses on early to mid-Holocene environments and archaeology in the lower Great Lakes region of North America.

Keith Dobney holds the 6th Century Chair of Human Palaeoecology in the Department of Archaeology, University of Aberdeen. For the last fifteen years he has been actively involved in developing and applying new techniques and approaches to the study of animal domestication and using the remains of domestic and commensal animals to explore the dispersal of early farmers across the Old World. He is currently one of two project leaders of a CNRS funded Projet de Groupement de Recherche Européen (GDRE) entitled BIOARCH-Bioarchaeological Investigations of the Interactions between Holocene Human Societies and their Environments, and the director of a Co-Reach funded Chinese-European research network (EUCH-BIOARCH). He is a co-author of Pigs and Humans: 10,000 Years of Interaction.

Katie Manning is a Research Associate at the University College London Institute of Archaeology. Her research centres on livestock intensification and the ecology of early farming practices and the evolution of dietary specialisation in Neolithic Europe. She has also worked extensively throughout West Africa, focusing on the Neolithisation of the Sahara-Sahel borderland. She is the co-editor of African Pottery Roulettes Past and Present: Techniques, Identification and Distribution.

Stephen Shennan is Professor of Theoretical Archaeology at University College London and Director of the UCL Institute of Archaeology. His research focuses on the development and application of cultural evolutionary theory and methods to understanding the past. He is currently principal investigator on the project Cultural Evolution of Neolithic Europe, funded by a European Research Council Advanced Grant and was previously Director of the AHRC-funded Centre for the Evolutionary Analysis of Cultural Behaviour. His books include Pattern and Process in Cultural Evolution (edited), Genes, Memes and Human History, and Quantifying Archaeology.

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Table of Contents

AcknowledgmentsForeword by Stephen Shennan1. The Origins and Spread of Stock-Keeping: An Introduction, Keith Dobney, Joris Peters, Sue Colledge, James Conolly, Katie Manning and Stephen Shennan2. Archaeological, Morphological and Genetic Approaches to Pig Domestication, Linus Girdland-Flink and Greger Larson3. Inferring Processes of Neolithic Gene-Culture Co-Evolution Using Genetic and Archaeological Data: The Case Of Lactase Persistence and Dairying, Pascale Gerbault, Ruth Bollongino, Joachim Burger and Mark G. Thomas4. Diverse Strategies: Evaluating the Appearance and Spread of Domestic Caprines in the Southern Levant, Louise Martin and Yvonne Edwards5. The Long and Winding Road: Ungulate Exploitation and Domestication in Early Neolithic Anatolia (10,000-7,000 Cal BC), Joris Peters, Hijlke Buitenhuis, Gisela Grupe, Klaus Schmidt and Nadja Pöllath6. Domestication Process and Domestic Ungulates: New Observations from Cyprus, Jean-Denis Vigne7. Early Stock-keeping in Greece, Paul Halstead and Valasia Isaakidou8. Early Farming Adaptations of the Northeast Adriatic Karst, Clive Bonsall, Dimitrij Mlekuž, László Bartosiewicz and Catriona Pickard9. Early Domestic Animals in Italy, Istria, the Tyrrhenian Islands and Southern France, Peter Rowley-Conwy, Lionel Gourichon, Daniel Helmer and Jean-Denis Vigne10. Domestication of Animals in the Iberian Peninsula, Maria Saña11. Origin Of Stock-Keeping and Spread of Animal Exploitation Strategies in the Early and Middle Neolithic Of The North European Plain , Arkadiusz Marciniak12. Animal Exploitation in the Early Neolithic of the Balkans and Central Europe. , Katie Manning, Barbara Stopp, Sue Colledge, Sean Downey, James Conolly, Keith Dobney and Stephen Shennan13. Zooarchaeological Data from Late Mesolithic and Neolithic Sites in Switzerland (ca. 6000-3500 cal BC), Jörg Schibler14. Early Neolithic Pastoral Traditions and Cultural Groups in Northern France, Rose-Marie Arbogast and Christian Jeunesse15. North of the Frontier: Early Domestic Animals in Northern Europe, Peter Rowley-Conwy16. On the Northwestern Fringes: Earlier Neolithic Subsistence in Britain and Ireland as Seen Through Faunal Remains and Stable Isotopes, Rick SchultingIndexAbout the Contributors

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