Origins of Intelligence: The Evolution of Cognitive Development in Monkeys, Apes, and Humans

Overview

Since Darwin's time, comparative psychologists have searched for a good way to compare cognition in humans and nonhuman primates. In Origins of Intelligence, Sue Parker and Michael McKinney offer such a framework and make a strong case for using human development theory (both Piagetian and neo-Piagetian) to study the evolution of intelligence across primate species. Their approach is comprehensive, covering a broad range of social, symbolic, physical, and logical domains, which ...

See more details below
Paperback
$28.51
BN.com price
(Save 4%)$30.00 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (20) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $24.53   
  • Used (14) from $1.99   
Origins of Intelligence: The Evolution of Cognitive Development in Monkeys, Apes, and Humans

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$16.99
BN.com price
(Save 43%)$30.00 List Price

Overview

Since Darwin's time, comparative psychologists have searched for a good way to compare cognition in humans and nonhuman primates. In Origins of Intelligence, Sue Parker and Michael McKinney offer such a framework and make a strong case for using human development theory (both Piagetian and neo-Piagetian) to study the evolution of intelligence across primate species. Their approach is comprehensive, covering a broad range of social, symbolic, physical, and logical domains, which fall under the all-encompassing and much-debated term intelligence.

A widely held theory among developmental psychologists and social and biological anthropologists is that cognitive evolution in humans has occurred through juvenilization—the gradual accentuation and lengthening of childhood in the evolutionary process. In this work, however, Parker and McKinney argue instead that new stages were added at the end of cognitive development in our hominid ancestors, coining the term adultification by terminal extension to explain this process.

Drawing evidence from scores of studies on monkeys, great apes, and human children, this book provides unique insights into ontogenetic constraints that have interacted with selective forces to shape the evolution of cognitive development in our lineage.

Johns Hopkins University Press

Since Darwin’s time, comparative psychologists have searched for a good way to compare cognition in humans and nonhuman primates. In Origins of Intelligence, the authors offer such a framework and make a strong case for using human development theory both Piagetian and neo-Piagetian to study the evolution of intelligence across primate species.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Human Development - Jonas Langer
The authors' elegant theory and comprehensive empirical synthesis of how the development of human intelligence and brain evolved opens up cascading heuristic avenues for creatively answering one of the great questions in the human history of ideas.
Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute - James Anderson
[ Origins of Intelligence is] worthy of a prominent place on the researcher's shelf... A handy source of information on comparative cognitive abilities related to life history and brain variables.
Journal of Human Evolution - Melissa A. Panger
Parker and McKinney's attempt to address the Origins of Intelligence is to be welcomed. Although the 'glittering prize' for unraveling the evolutionary history of modern human intelligence is probably still unclaimed, the authors' broad integration of ontogenetic, comparative, and evolutionary evidence is an approach that holds much promise. If you are interested in the evolution of primate cognition (whether a primatologist, paleoanthropologist, psychologist, etc.) you should read Origins of Intelligence.
James Anderson

[ Origins of Intelligence is] worthy of a prominent place on the researcher's shelf... A handy source of information on comparative cognitive abilities related to life history and brain variables.

Jonas Langer

The authors' elegant theory and comprehensive empirical synthesis of how the development of human intelligence and brain evolved opens up cascading heuristic avenues for creatively answering one of the great questions in the human history of ideas.

Melissa A. Panger

Parker and McKinney's attempt to address the Origins of Intelligence is to be welcomed. Although the 'glittering prize' for unraveling the evolutionary history of modern human intelligence is probably still unclaimed, the authors' broad integration of ontogenetic, comparative, and evolutionary evidence is an approach that holds much promise. If you are interested in the evolution of primate cognition (whether a primatologist, paleoanthropologist, psychologist, etc.) you should read Origins of Intelligence.

Jonas Langer
The authors' elegant theory and comprehensive empirical synthesis of how the development of human intelligence and brain evolved opens up avenues for creatively answering one of the great questions in the human history of ideas.
Kenneth J. McNamara
A fascinating and elegantly crafted book. Seminal reading for anyone interested in how our cognitive development is inextricably linked with our evolutionary heritage. The authors argue clearly and convincingly that recapitulation is alive and well in the evolution of our brain.
Booknews
Parker (anthropology, Sonoma State U., California) and McKinney (geological sciences, U. of Tennessee-Knoxville) offer a framework for comparing cognition in humans and nonhuman primates. They draw on Piagetian and neo-Piagetian versions of human development theory to study the evolution of intelligence across primate species. A widely held theory is that evolution occurred by gradually accentuating and lengthening childhood, i.e. juvenilization; they argue instead that new stages have been added to the end of cognitive development, a process they christen adultification by terminal extension. They write for general readers. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780801866715
  • Publisher: Hopkins Fulfillment Service
  • Publication date: 11/20/2000
  • Pages: 428
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.95 (d)

Meet the Author

Sue Taylor Parker is a professor of anthropology at Sonoma State University in Rohnert Park, California. Her works include "Language" and Intelligence in Monkeys and Apes, Self-Awareness in Animals and Humans, Reaching into Thought, and Naming Our Ancestors.Michael L. McKinney is an associate professor of geological sciences at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville and author of several books, including Heterochrony.

Johns Hopkins University Press

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contents:



Preface

Acknowledgments

Introduction



PART I COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN HUMAN AND NONHUMAN PRIMATES

Comparative Developmental Studies of Primate Cognition

Development of Physical Cognition in Children, Apes, and Monkeys

Development of Logical-Mathematical Cognition in Children, Apes, and Monkeys

Development of Social Cognition in Children, Apes, and Monkeys

Development of Language in Young Children and Apes

Comparing Primate Cognition across Domains: Integration or Isolation?

Cognitive Development in the Context of Life History



PART II THE EVOLUTION OF COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT

Development and Evolution: A Primer

The Evolution of Human Mental Development

Cognitive Adaptations of Apes and Humans

Comparing Adaptive Scenarios for Primate Cognition

The Evolution and Development of the Brain

Cognitive Complexity and Progress in Evolution



References

Index

Johns Hopkins University Press

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)