Orlando Furioso

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More About This Textbook

Overview

Ariosto's Orlando Furioso 1532 is the culmination of the chivalric legends of Charlemagne and the Saracen invasion of France, a brilliantly witty parody of the medieval romances, and a fitting monument to the court society of the Italian Renaissance which gave it birth. In a kaleidoscope of scenes and emotions, three principal stories are developed: the love of Orlando for Angelica; the war between the Franks and Saracens; and the love of Ruggiero, a Saracen, for Bradamant, a Christian. Enlivening and unifying the whole work is the vital personality of the author, endlessly teasing his readers and dropping casual asides about his contemporaries. Though highly serious in purpose and sophisticated in design, Orlando Furioso displays to the full Ariosto's remarkable sense of the absurd. This unabridged prose translation faithfully captures the narrative entire and renders meaning in its lightest shadings.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780198124078
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication date: 5/28/1972
  • Series: Italian Texts Series
  • Pages: 744

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 13 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 15 of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2001

    A Great Classic ¿ with an obscure message

    Although ¿Orlando Furioso¿ is one of the Great Classics, in terms of household recognition it has not held its own. It is not nearly as well known as Dante¿s Divine Comedy (for example) -- a work to which it is sometimes compared. It has been aptly described as a combination of Homer and Cervantes¿s ¿Don Quixote.¿ To these I would add Boccaccio¿s ¿Decameron.¿ ¿Orlando Furioso¿ deals with the exploits of Charlemagne¿s paladins (knights) in their attempts to repulse the ¿Saracen¿ (Moorish) invasion of France. Against this rich backdrop all sorts of adventures take place: knightly combat, amorous dalliance, as well as encounters with dragons, nymphs, and sundry other magic. Ariosto wrote ¿Orlando Furioso¿ around 1516, some 750 years after the events purportedly took place. It is therefore not surprising the work contains many anachronisms. His warriors ¿ both Christian and Saracen ¿ fight in full body armor with stirrups and lance. (A mode of fighting did not develop until well after the year 1000.) He makes reference to Tartars and Prester John. But ¿Tartars¿ is another name for Mongols, who were not known in Europe until the 13th century. The legend of Prester John has a similarly late origin. In an age greatly concerned with violence, especially the ¿gratuitous¿ kind, the violence in Orlando comes as something of a shock. There are frequent graphic depictions of heads lopped off and bodies cloven in twain. Also somewhat surprising are the great powers attributed to women. But it is unclear whether Ariosto was an early woman¿s libber. More likely he reflects prevailing views, which gave women more due than we like to attribute to past ages. Perhaps the status of women (and men) is governed by cyclical events, such as population pressures. If there is a dominant message in ¿Orlando Furioso¿ I found it hard to identify. Possibly the title holds a clue: ¿Orlando¿ is the name of the principal protagonist, and ¿Furioso¿ means ¿mad¿ or ¿rabid.¿ What drove Orlando mad? Why, a faithless woman, of course! Yet one gets the impression that Ariosto intends most of the blame to go to Orlando himself. In pursuing this woman (an enemy, to boot) he betrays many of the ideals of courtly love. He turns the great powers of sublimated love to selfish interests. For this he is punished with madness.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2007

    Verse printed as prose

    Rose's translation is indeed in verse, but Echo Press prints each stanza as if it were a prose paragraph (except that the first word of each line of verse is capitalized). This does allow for a clearly-printed, readable text at a bargain price. Rose's translation is accurate but stiff, and he leaves out entirely passages deemed too salacious for his nineteenth-century readers.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2000

    poetry or prose

    i, as a customer, deserve to have correct information displayed to me when deciding on a particular book to buy. in the reader's catalog, there is indication that it is verse. in the description from the editor, there is a claim for prose. one of them, of course, is wrong.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2013

    Harper to molly

    He probably likes u. Hes just tryin to act cool so you will think hes cool and therefore like him even more. Ps is he cute?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2013

    Cat to Molly

    1) it either means that he like u and is embaressed to tell that infront of his friend or that his isn't sure if he has feelings for you. Trust me. I watch a show called the bacollerette all the time. It is about love and finding the right person. Hope u liked the advice!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2013

    Alec to Molly

    It means he likes you but he likes someoneelse too or that he likes you but doesn't know how to tell you. Trust me im a guy and im haveing the experince and if you want like try and help me with my girl probelm then goto training res 4.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2013

    Glimmer

    1) He was getting your hopes up only to drop you down ((Don't know if he's that kinda guy, just telling you.))
    2) He likes you(like, head over heels) but he's embaressed for some reason
    3) He found someone else
    4) He doesn't know what to say to you
    What I suggest doing: Talk to him or text him and ask him. Tell him you're confused and ask why. At best: Everything will turn out great and you'll live happily ever after with rainbows and unicorns. At worst: You'll have to find someone else.
    Hope this helped!
    ~•Glimmer•~

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2013

    Cardinal to Molly

    Im just gonna tell you right now. There are two answers. One, it means he likes you! Hes hinting, hopefully hoping you will drop some hints. And two, he doesnt really know his feelings, but likes you. Wait, that sounded confusing. Anyways I hope I helped!<p>
    ~Cardinal (^•)>

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2013

    Jo to molly

    Hey im sorry but im not that good at boy stuff. I will tell you wat i no from experience. My sister went hiking with me and my crush colton and i was late and they "talked" she told him i liked him and he said he kinda liked me. I gave him my # to kep in touch and he has called me three times in a month and emailed me once. What creeps me out is he calls me babe and says i love you when we dont even know each other that well. He has told his friends we r dating and never asked me out. Then i found out my long time crush liked me and was planning on asking me out in th middle of summer. Now we have been in skool for three days and he hasnt talked to me. I have no clue about boys they confuse me. Sorry i didnt have any good advice! ~Jo

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2013

    O harper

    Yes he is adorable. And go to the last res. I updated my boy prob.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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