Orville: A Dog Story

Overview

A big, ugly dog is happy to meet a farmer and his wife who decide to give him a name and a home, but not so happy when they chain him to the barn. All Orville can do is bark to tell the world how unhappy he is, and the more he barks, the more he is left alone. But everything changes when Sally MacIntosh moves into the little house across the road and Orville falls in love.
A beautifully crafted text that blends wry humor with the poignant twang of a country-and-western song is ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (7) from $10.92   
  • New (1) from $59.27   
  • Used (6) from $10.92   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$59.27
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(336)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

A big, ugly dog is happy to meet a farmer and his wife who decide to give him a name and a home, but not so happy when they chain him to the barn. All Orville can do is bark to tell the world how unhappy he is, and the more he barks, the more he is left alone. But everything changes when Sally MacIntosh moves into the little house across the road and Orville falls in love.
A beautifully crafted text that blends wry humor with the poignant twang of a country-and-western song is accompanied by dreamy, spare watercolor-and-ink illustrations for a fresh, original picture book that will resonate with anyone who has ever felt lonely or misunderstood.

Chained alone in a barn by the couple he thought might give him a good home, a very ugly stray dog is miserable until a new neighbor moves in and he falls in love.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"a tender story...eloquent...children will recognize the sadness and anger as well as the yearning and the powerful bond." BOOKLIST Booklist, ALA

"captures a child's sense of simplicity and exuberance...Parker's winsome portraits illuminate the story...children will cheer when Orville finds love" PUBLISHERS WEEKLY Publishers Weekly

"a poetic...vivid tale...fresh and effective...a heartening...readaloud for kids who know their Orville is out there somewhere." THE BULLETIN OF THE CENTER FOR CHILDREN'S BOOKS, Starred Review The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, Starred

"Poignant and sweet...reads like a country-and-western song...allows the text to shine...readers...will identify with Orville." SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL School Library Journal

"Parker's distinguised watercolor paintings...blend so perfectly with Kimmel's spare, unsentimental language that words and pictures become a veritable poem." THE BOSTON GLOBE Boston Globe

"A big ugly dog is rescued by a farm couple...at its heart, this is a love story." HARTFORD COURANT Hartford Courant

"Parker's distinguished watercolor paintings...blend so perfectly with Kimmel's spare, unsentimental language that words and pictures become a veritable poem." BOSTON GLOBE Boston Globe

Publishers Weekly
Written from a dog's-eye view, and enlivened by Parker's (Action Jackson) pen-and-ink drawings, Kimmel's first picture book adopts a tone that, half-bleak, half-whimsical, only partially speaks to a young audience. Kimmel, author of the best-selling memoir for adults A Girl Named Zippy, introduces an ugly stray searching for love. She's at her best when she imagines Orville's voice, which captures a child's sense of simplicity and exuberance. "Wouldn't it be nice just to jump right up on her," Orville thinks when he first spots Maybelle, his new owner-to-be, "but remembered the part about knocking people down and so he didn't." Orville can divine people's memories and desires from the way they smell. He sniffs Maybelle's hand and knows "her dearest wishes... To fly a little airplane. To lead a parade. To serve as the sheriff of a small town." Readers will hope that Herbert and Maybelle's farm may be the home Orville craves, but Herbert, over Maybelle's protests, chains the dog to the barn, where he howls and broods and thinks about "what an awful, lonesome life his had turned out to be." Parker's winsome portraits illuminate the story with intuition that rivals Orville's. The author at times overstates her case; much of the text turns on the unspoken dreams and buried hopes of adults. But children will cheer when Orville finds love across the street, and will appreciate his optimistic belief that "it would all work out somehow." Ages 5-8. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Orville was lost and then he came to a farm and was so happy to see the farmer and his wife. They chained him to the barn as a watchdog. His heart was broken but he had food and water. Orville slept, dreamed a lot, and smelled rabbits in the fields. He barked and jumped so Herbert and Maybelle were afraid to get too close. One day a girl with cotton-candy hair moved in across the road. He barked for her attention and she waved at him! Orville watched Sally Macintosh go to work and come home. He slid out of his chain and ran across the road. When Sally woke Maybelle was at the screen door. Maybelle called the fire department to come and get Orville and this prompted Herbert to say that Orville had to go to the pound. Orville slipped from his chain again and went to guard Sally while she slept. Sally and Jimmy Duncan, one of the firemen, entered Orville in the Ugliest Contest at the county fair and he won. Orville wound up looking after Sally, Maybelle and Herbert and was happy that he was free of the chain. This is a story about lonesomeness and about being free from chains. It is a sad and a happy story. Robert Andrew Parker has matched the illustrations to the story in a unique way. This book will appeal to children and adults. 2002, Clarion Books, Ages 5 to 8.
—Naomi Butler
School Library Journal
Gr 2-5-Orville, an ugly, homeless dog that has just about given up on life, is discovered one morning by a farmer and his wife who decide he will make a good watchdog. After they clean him up, they realize he is bigger and wilder than they thought, so he is chained to the barn and left alone to keep the rats away. He barks to let the world know just how miserable he feels, but the more he barks, the more the farmer stays away. Just when it is decided that Orville must go to the pound, a young woman who works nights in a factory moves into the small house across the road, and Orville falls in love. After watching Sally's comings and goings, he devises a plan, struggles free of his chain, and quietly enters her house while she is sleeping. Finally gaining acceptance, Orville moves in with Sally and finds the perfect home. Poignant and sweet, the narrative reads like a country-and-western song about sorrow and loneliness: "-he would wonder what had ever become of his mother, or the brother he had loved the best. And then it would be time to start barking." Parker's signature watercolor-and-ink illustrations are sketchy and imprecise. He takes liberties with the size and shape of Orville as well as with Sally's living room. The effect is more impressionistic than realistic, but allows the text to shine. Readers who have ever loved a homely pet or felt the pain of being misunderstood will identify with Orville.-Wendy Woodfill, Hennepin County Library, Minnetonka, MN Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Orville is a huge, unattractive stray dog who is taken in by an older couple on a farm in this overly long, depressing tale, a first children’s story from memoirist Kimmel. The dog has been abused in his former life, and now he’s chained to the barn and becomes an angry, chronic barker. The text describes the dog’s thoughts and his perspective on the farm couple, with philosophical musings about his own hopeless life at the end of a chain. Orville "falls in love" with a pretty young neighbor from afar and then repeatedly breaks his chain and enters her house. The enigmatic conclusion hints that each character has broken free of some sort of chain to connect with others, a theme that will fly right by most children. Parker’s sophisticated watercolors add some interest to the effort, but this misguided attempt is too long and too esoteric for the intended audience, another illustrated short story with adult sensibilities. (Picture book. 6-9)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780618159550
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 9/22/2003
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.50 (w) x 6.50 (h) x 0.13 (d)

Meet the Author

Haven Kimmel
Robert Andrew Parker has illustrated more than seventy books for children, including THE HATMAKER'S SIGHN (Orchard Books) and, most recently, SLEDS ON BOSTON COMMON (Simon & Schuster). His POP CORN AND MA GOODNESS was a Caldecott Honor Book. Mr. Parker lives in West Cornwall, Connecticut.

Biography

Haven Kimmel is the author of the memoir A Girl Named Zippy. She studied English and creative writing at Ball State University and North Carolina State University. She also attended seminary at the Earlham School of Religion. She lives in Durham, North Carolina.

Author biography courtesy of Random House, Inc.

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      Durham, North Carolina
    1. Date of Birth:
      1965
    2. Place of Birth:
      Mooreland, Indiana
    1. Education:
      B.A., Ball State University
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)