Oscar Wilde: A Collection of Critical Essays / Edition 1

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Overview

For all Literature and/or Literary Criticism courses.

  • A generation ago Prentice Hall's Twentieth Century Views series set the standard for truly useful collections of literary criticism on widely studied authors. These collections of essays, selected and introduced by distinguished scholars, made the most informative and provocative critical work on each writer easily available to students, scholars, and the general public.
  • Now the New Century Views series, co-edited by Richard Brodhead and Maynard Mack, offers volumes of the same excellence for the contemporary moment. Each volume captures and makes accessible the most stimulating critical writing of our time on crucial literary figures of the past and present. Also included in each is an introduction to the author's life and work, a chronology of important dates, and a selected bibliography.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131460447
  • Publisher: Longman
  • Publication date: 12/4/1995
  • Series: New Century Views Series
  • Edition description: Facsimile
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 249
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction, Jonathan Freedman.

WILDE AS CRITIC.

Notes on “Camp,” Susan Sontag.

The Critic as Artist as Wilde, Richard Ellmann.

Different Desires: Subjectivity and Transgression in Wilde and Gide, Jonathan Dollimore.

Creating the Audience, Regenia Gagnier.

Oscar Wild, W.H. and the Unspoken Name of Love, Lawrence Danson.

THE DRAMA.

Traversing the Feminine in Oscar Wilde's Salomé, Richard Dellamora.

Wilde and the Evasion of Principle, Joseph Loewenstein.

“The Importance of Being Earnest,” Katharine Worth.

The Significance of Literature (The Importance of Being Earnest), Joel Fineman.

DORIAN AND BEYOND.

Oscar Wilde in Japan: Aestheticism, Orientalism and the Derealization of the Homosexual, Jeff Nunokawa.

Writing Gone Wilde: Homoerotic Desire in the Closet of Representation, Ed Cohen.

Promoting Dorian Gray, Rachel Bowlby.

Wilde, Nietzsche, and the Sentimental Relations of the Male Body, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick.

Wilde's Hard Labor and the Birth of Gay Reading, Wayne Koestenbaum.

Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young, Oscar Wilde.

Chronology of Important Dates.

Bibliography.

Notes on Contributors.

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