OSPF: Anatomy of an Internet Routing Protocol

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $12.98
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 76%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (15) from $12.98   
  • New (5) from $39.16   
  • Used (10) from $12.98   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$39.16
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(9522)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
New Book. Shipped from US within 4 to 14 business days. Established seller since 2000

Ships from: Secaucus, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$43.09
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(17202)

Condition: New
Brand New, Perfect Condition, Please allow 4-14 business days for delivery. 100% Money Back Guarantee, Over 1,000,000 customers served.

Ships from: Westminster, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$43.10
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(23160)

Condition: New
BRAND NEW

Ships from: Avenel, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$58.99
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(86)

Condition: New
PAPERBACK New 0201634724 Special order direct from the distributor.

Ships from: Victoria, Canada

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$72.16
Seller since 2013

Feedback rating:

(2)

Condition: New
New

Ships from: San Diego, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

Written for TCP/IP network administrators, protocol designers, and network application developers, this book gives the most complete and practical view ever into the inner workings of Internet routing. The book focuses on OSPF (Open Shortest Path First), a common TCP/IP routing protocol that provides robust and efficient routing support in the most demanding Internet environments. A methodical and detailed description of the protocol is offered and OSPF's role within the wider context of a TCP/IP network is demonstrated.

Practical throughout, the book provides not only a theoretical description of Internet routing, but also a real-world look into how theory translates into practice. It shows how algorithms are implemented, and how the routing protocols function in a working network where transmission lines and routers routinely break down.

You will find clear explanations of such routing fundamentals as how a router forwards packets, IP addressing, CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing), the routing table, Internet routing architecture, and the two main routing technologies: Distance Vector and link-state algorithms. OSPF is discussed in depth, with an examination of the rationale behind OSPF's design decisions and how it has evolved to keep pace with the rapidly changing Internet environment. OSPF topics covered by the book include the following:

  • OSPF areas and virtual links
  • NBMA (Nonbroadcast multi-access) and Point-to-MultiPoint network segments
  • OSPF configuration and management
  • Interaction with other routing protocols
  • OSPF cryptographic authentication
  • OSPF protocol extensions, including the Demand Circuit extensions and the multicast extensions to OSPF (MOSPF)
  • An OSPF FAQ

IP multicast and multicast routing are also discussed. Methods for debugging routing problems are explained, including a catalog of available debugging tools. The book also offers side-by-side comparisons of all the unicast and multicast routing protocols currently in use in the Internet.

You will come away from this book with a sophisticated understanding of Internet routing and of the OSPF protocol in particular. Moreover, the book's practical focus will enable you to put this deeper understanding to work in your network environment.

0201634724B04062001


This excellent publication is one of the few that actually details the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing protocol. It explains the inner workings of routers and provides descriptions of OSPF implementation within the context of TCP/IP protocols. To get the most out of the book, you should be familiar with the TCP/IP suite of protocols.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Written for TCP/IP network administrators, protocol designers, and network application developers, this introductory text explains the inner workings of the OSPF (Open Shortest Path First) TCP/IP routing protocol for the Internet. Topics covered include: OSBF virtual links, NBMA (nonbroadcast multi-access) network segments, interactions with other routing protocols, and protocol extensions. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780201634723
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 2/2/1998
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 345
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

John T. Moy is a Senior Consulting Engineer at Ascend Communications. He is the author of the OSPF and MOSPF protocol specifications and currently chairs the OSPF and MOSPF Working Groups in the Internet Engineering Task Force. Mr. Moy has been involved in the design and development of router software for 15 years, currently at Ascend, and previously at Proteon and at Bolt Beranek and Newman. Mr. Moy holds a Master of Arts in Mathematics from Princeton University and a Bachelor of Engineering in Mathematics from the University of Minnesota.

0201634724AB04062001

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Introduction The Internet is a global communications network. With connections in more than 100 countries, tens of millions of people use the Internet for business, education, and recreation. Electronic commerce is beginning on the Internet as businesses connect to sell their products and services. Academics collaborate over the Internet by exchanging electronic mail. People can converse using Internet phones, send faxes, participate in online chats and bulletin boards, play multiuser games, and experiment with virtual environments. Special-purpose computers called routers connect the Internet together. As data is forwarded from one place in the Internet to another, it is the routers that make the decisions as to where and how the data is forwarded. The protocols that dynamically inform the routers of the paths that the data should take are called routing protocols. It is the job of these protocols to react quickly to changes in the Internet's infrastructure, such as transmission lines going in and out of service, routers crashing, changes in network policies, and so on. Routing is what makes the Internet tick. Although many users of the Internet and the World Wide Web are unaware of the machinery underlying the network applications, routing is an interesting but complicated subject. Routing protocols are sophisticated distributed algorithms that must also be extremely robust to keep a large, decentralized network like the Internet running smoothly. Audience This book is for students of data communications, TCP/IP network administrators, protocol designers, developers of routing protocol software, and other professionals involved in the design, development, and managementof TCP/IP networks. This book is a practical, hands-on description of Internet routing rather than a theoretical treatment. Although we describe how the various protocols were intended to work, we also describe how well the design has translated into practice. Internet protocol design is a practical undertaking itself, with efficiency of implementation often dictating design choices. For this reason, this book gives an in-depth treatment of how a router really works. Instead of just describing the algorithms, this book goes beyond to show how the algorithms are implemented. We often present ideas in a historical context, showing how Internet protocols have evolved. This is done for two reasons. First, you can learn a lot from the mistakes (and successes) of the past. Second, in order to participate in Internet discussion groups, many of which are dominated by old-timers, it is good to have some context. This book is not an elementary introduction to TCP/IP and its routing. Instead we assume that you have some familiarity with the TCP/IP protocol suite and some exposure to the basic concepts of routing. These assumptions allow us to explore many of the facets of Internet routing in greater detail than possible in an introductory text. Organization of This Book

This book is organized into five parts. Part I sets the groundwork for a discussion of Internet routing. After a brief description of how routing fits together with the rest of the Internet's protocols, Chapter 1 describes in depth how a router forwards packets. This discussion naturally leads to an explanation of IP addressing and CIDR, as well as of the interaction of hosts and routers. Internet routing protocols are introduced in Chapter 2, beginning with a treatment of the end product of all routing protocols: the router's routing table. Chapter 2 ends with an overview of the Internet's routing architecture and the two main routing technologies in use in today's Internet: Distance Vector and link-state algorithms.

Part II describes the Internet's OSPF routing protocol. We start in Chapter 3 with an explanation of why the OSPF protocol was developed in the first place. Chapter 4 discusses the basics of link-state routing; Chapter 5, how OSPF behaves over various subnet technologies; Chapter 6, its use of hierarchical routing; and Chapter 7, extensions to OSPF. Each chapter not only describes how OSPF works but also explains why it works that way. We explore the reasons behind OSPF's design decisions and how the OSPF protocol has evolved to keep pace with the rapidly changing Internet environment. Part II concludes with an OSPF FAQ (Chapter 8).

Part III (Chapters 9 and 10) describes TCP/IP multicast routing, including broadcast and multicast forwarding, the MBONE, and the two distinct types of multicast routing protocols: source-based trees and shared-tree algorithms. As we did with unicast routing, we go further into the subject of multicast routing through the examination of a particular multicast routing protocol: the Multicast Extensions to OSPF (MOSPF).

Part IV covers the configuration and management of Internet routing. The configuration and management of OSPF is explained in detail in Chapter 11. Chapter 12 describes the tools used to monitor and debug routing in a TCP/IP network. For each tool, we describe its use, how it works, and its advantages and drawbacks.

Part V is a comparison of Internet routing protocols. Chapter 13 compares and contrasts the routing protocols in use in the Internet: RIP, OSPF, BGP, IGRP, and IS-IS. In Chapter 14, we examine the available multicast protocols: DVMRP, MOSPF, PIM Dense and Sparse, and CBT.

Following Chapter 14 is an extensive bibliography arranged and numbered in alphabetical order. Within the text, the citation 85, for example, refers to item 85 in the bibliography. Companion Book: OSPF Complete Implementation

The companion book OSPF Complete Implementation, in keeping with the Internet tradition that reveres "working code" over all else, explores even further the mechanics of Internet routing through examination of a real, working OSPF implementation. The book contains a complete implementation of OSPF on CD. Written in C++, the OSPF implementation is intended to be portable to a wide range of environments. Two sample ports are included: an OSPF routing daemon (called ospfd) for FreeBSD 2.1 and an OSPF routing simulator that can be run on Windows 95. The OSPF implementation has been developed using publicly available tools. Acknowledgments

I would like to thank the technical reviewers who improved this book through their thoughtful and timely reviews: Ran Atkinson, Eural Authement, Fred Baker, Howard Berkowitz, Jeffrey Burgan, Joel Halpern, Mukesh Kacker, Robert Minnear, Jim Reid, and W. Richard Stevens. Thanks also to Tim Stoddard and the Arkansas Public School Computer Network (APSCN) for letting me collect OSPF statistics on the APSCN network and use that network as an example of OSPF configuration in Chapter 11, Configuration and Management. Thanks to S. Randall McLamb for drawing the figures.

I would also like to acknowledge the help of my editors at Addison Wesley Longman over the long life of this project: Carol Long, Karen Gettman, and Mary Harrington.

And special thanks to my wife, Sonya Keene, who designed the book, edited rough drafts, created the index, and gave encouragement while this book was being written. J.M.
October, 1997

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Tables
List of Figures
Preface
Ch. 1 Role of Routers in the Internet 3
Ch. 2 Internet Routing Protocols 27
Ch. 3 Developing the OSPF Protocol 43
Ch. 4 OSPF Basics 71
Ch. 5 OSPF Network Types 101
Ch. 6 Hierarchical Routing in OSPF 119
Ch. 7 OSPF Extensions 135
Ch. 8 An OSPF FAQ 151
Ch. 9 Internet Multicast Routing 171
Ch. 10 MOSPF 187
Ch. 11 OSPF Management 213
Ch. 12 Debugging Routing Problems 243
Ch. 13 Unicast Routing Protocols 275
Ch. 14 Multicast Routing Protocols 309
Bibliography 317
Index 331
Read More Show Less

Preface

The Internet is a global communications network. With connections in more than 100 countries, tens of millions of people use the Internet for business, education, and recreation. Electronic commerce is beginning on the Internet as businesses connect to sell their products and services. Academics collaborate over the Internet by exchanging electronic mail. People can converse using Internet phones, send faxes, participate in online chats and bulletin boards, play multiuser games, and experiment with virtual environments. Special-purpose computers called routers connect the Internet together. As data is forwarded from one place in the Internet to another, it is the routers that make the decisions as to where and how the data is forwarded. The protocols that dynamically inform the routers of the paths that the data should take are called routing protocols. It is the job of these protocols to react quickly to changes in the InternetÕs infrastructure, such as transmission lines going in and out of service, routers crashing, changes in network policies, and so on. Routing is what makes the Internet tick. Although many users of the Internet and the World Wide Web are unaware of the machinery underlying the network applications, routing is an interesting but complicated subject. Routing protocols are sophisticated distributed algorithms that must also be extremely robust to keep a large, decentralized network like the Internet running smoothly.

Audience

This book is for students of data communications, TCP/IP network administrators, protocol designers, developers of routing protocol software, and other professionals involved in the design, development, and management of TCP/IP networks. This book is a practical, hands-on description of Internet routing rather than a theoretical treatment. Although we describe how the various protocols were intended to work, we also describe how well the design has translated into practice. Internet protocol design is a practical undertaking itself, with efficiency of implementation often dictating design choices. For this reason, this book gives an in-depth treatment of how a router really works. Instead of just describing the algorithms, this book goes beyond to show how the algorithms are implemented. We often present ideas in a historical context, showing how Internet protocols have evolved. This is done for two reasons. First, you can learn a lot from the mistakes (and successes) of the past. Second, in order to participate in Internet discussion groups, many of which are dominated by old-timers, it is good to have some context. This book is not an elementary introduction to TCP/IP and its routing. Instead we assume that you have some familiarity with the TCP/IP protocol suite and some exposure to the basic concepts of routing. These assumptions allow us to explore many of the facets of Internet routing in greater detail than possible in an introductory text.

Organization of This Book

This book is organized into five parts. Part I sets the groundwork for a discussion of Internet routing. After a brief description of how routing fits together with the rest of the InternetÕs protocols, Chapter 1 describes in depth how a router forwards packets. This discussion naturally leads to an explanation of IP addressing and CIDR, as well as of the interaction of hosts and routers. Internet routing protocols are introduced in Chapter 2, beginning with a treatment of the end product of all routing protocols: the routerÕs routing table. Chapter 2 ends with an overview of the InternetÕs routing architecture and the two main routing technologies in use in todayÕs Internet: Distance Vector and link-state algorithms.

Part II describes the InternetÕs OSPF routing protocol. We start in Chapter 3 with an explanation of why the OSPF protocol was developed in the first place. Chapter 4 discusses the basics of link-state routing; Chapter 5, how OSPF behaves over various subnet technologies; Chapter 6, its use of hierarchical routing; and Chapter 7, extensions to OSPF. Each chapter not only describes how OSPF works but also explains why it works that way. We explore the reasons behind OSPFÕs design decisions and how the OSPF protocol has evolved to keep pace with the rapidly changing Internet environment. Part II concludes with an OSPF FAQ (Chapter 8).

Part III (Chapters 9 and 10) describes TCP/IP multicast routing, including broadcast and multicast forwarding, the MBONE, and the two distinct types of multicast routing protocols: source-based trees and shared-tree algorithms. As we did with unicast routing, we go further into the subject of multicast routing through the examination of a particular multicast routing protocol: the Multicast Extensions to OSPF (MOSPF).

Part IV covers the configuration and management of Internet routing. The configuration and management of OSPF is explained in detail in Chapter 11. Chapter 12 describes the tools used to monitor and debug routing in a TCP/IP network. For each tool, we describe its use, how it works, and its advantages and drawbacks.

Part V is a comparison of Internet routing protocols. Chapter 13 compares and contrasts the routing protocols in use in the Internet: RIP, OSPF, BGP, IGRP, and IS-IS. In Chapter 14, we examine the available multicast protocols: DVMRP, MOSPF, PIM Dense and Sparse, and CBT.

Following Chapter 14 is an extensive bibliography arranged and numbered in alphabetical order. Within the text, the citation [85], for example, refers to item 85 in the bibliography.

Companion Book: OSPF Complete Implementation

The companion book OSPF Complete Implementation, in keeping with the Internet tradition that reveres Òworking codeÓ over all else, explores even further the mechanics of Internet routing through examination of a real, working OSPF implementation. The book contains a complete implementation of OSPF on CD. Written in C++, the OSPF implementation is intended to be portable to a wide range of environments. Two sample ports are included: an OSPF routing daemon (called ospfd) for FreeBSD 2.1 and an OSPF routing simulator that can be run on Windows 95. The OSPF implementation has been developed using publicly available tools.

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank the technical reviewers who improved this book through their thoughtful and timely reviews: Ran Atkinson, Eural Authement, Fred Baker, Howard Berkowitz, Jeffrey Burgan, Joel Halpern, Mukesh Kacker, Robert Minnear, Jim Reid, and W. Richard Stevens. Thanks also to Tim Stoddard and the Arkansas Public School Computer Network (APSCN) for letting me collect OSPF statistics on the APSCN network and use that network as an example of OSPF configuration in Chapter 11, Configuration and Management. Thanks to S. Randall McLamb for drawing the figures.

I would also like to acknowledge the help of my editors at Addison Wesley Longman over the long life of this project: Carol Long, Karen Gettman, and Mary Harrington.

And special thanks to my wife, Sonya Keene, who designed the book, edited rough drafts, created the index, and gave encouragement while this book was being written.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)