Othello: The Moor of Venice

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This second edition of Othello updates the first (Bristol Classical Press, 1987), both chronologically and conceptually. It includes consideration of productions from the last seventeen years, and reconsiders earlier material in the light of more recent critical attitudes. Post-colonial and feminist studies have had an impact on the way Othello is perceived and interpreted. The question of blacked-up/black/colour-blind casting and the significance of white and/or black audiences in different political and racial ...
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Overview

This second edition of Othello updates the first (Bristol Classical Press, 1987), both chronologically and conceptually. It includes consideration of productions from the last seventeen years, and reconsiders earlier material in the light of more recent critical attitudes. Post-colonial and feminist studies have had an impact on the way Othello is perceived and interpreted. The question of blacked-up/black/colour-blind casting and the significance of white and/or black audiences in different political and racial contexts have recently become much more clearly articulated. In the process, Shakespeare himself has not escaped the charge of racism. Equally, the position of Desdemona has received more focused attention, both as the forbidden object of desire within a racial framework and as a woman in her own right. This edition takes account of these developments in criticism, in the theatre, on film and in the adaptations which set out to interrogate Shakespeare's text.

Presents the original text of Shakespeare's play side by side with a modern version, with marginal notes and explanations and full descriptions of each character.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
More than a retelling, this aptly termed "reconceptualization" provocatively modernizes Shakespeare's play. As in the original, the middle-aged general Othello the ``moor'' and young European noblewoman Desdemona fall in love and marry secretly. But Lester (To Be a Slave; John Henry) transplants the action from Venice and Cyprus to Elizabethan England and turns Iago and Emily into Africans like Othello, so that the three of them share a distinctly non-European point of view. Iago's envy of Othello and ability to whip him into a jealous rage at Desdemona are thus cast in a new light, though the tragic outcome remains the same. While the ending feels abrupt, Lester's novel succeeds in holding up a mirror to contemporary society. Phrases and passages directly based on Shakespeare's language are printed in a different typeface, a device that may distract the reader but eases comparisons with the original work. Ages 8-12. (Apr.)
The ALAN Review - Barbara G. Samuels
Shakespeare's plays often retell stories from other sources. In this novel, Julius Lester reverses that order and transforms Othello from drama to novel form. In doing so, he further investigates the characters of Othello, Iago, and Desdemona and provides answers to questions left unanswered by Shakespeare. He transforms Iago and his wife Emilia into Africans, sets the novel in England, and explores the racial issues in the story. Lester, author of books on slavery and African Americans in the United States, makes the mixed-race marriage and the relationships between blacks and whites more relevant and accessible to contemporary young people with his interpretation of the play. Of course most of the language in the novel is changed, but readers familiar with Shakespeare will recognize phrases and sentences as well as modern paraphrasing of allusions to Elizabethan society. Othello: A Novel may provide a transition to help students move into Shakespeare while at the same time raising challenging questions for discussion.
School Library Journal
Gr 10 Up-Naxos AudioBooks' top-drawer Classic Drama Series blissfully continues with this exquisite rendition of Othello starring Hugh Quarshie, Anton Lesser, Emma Fielding, and a full cast of professional English actors with extensive credits in the Royal National Theatre, BBC Radio Drama Company, and the Royal Shakespeare Company. Shakespeare's most domestic tragedy is an exceedingly complex journey through jealousy, self-doubt, inadequacies, and societal acceptance. Passed over for military promotion, Iago, perhaps Shakespeare's most nefarious character, manipulates Othello's downfall, culminating in the murder of his beloved wife, Desdemona, and Othello's subsequent suicide. Under David Timson's stewardship as director, the story is beautifully and simply told, embellished only with intermittent brassy flourishes of classical music and a dramatic echo effect and throbbing heart beat to underscore Othello's chaotic descent and rage. While the entire cast is excellent, the trio of Quarshie (Othello), Lesser (Iago), and Fielding (Desdemona) are outstanding. An outline of each individual cassette, complete synopsis, full notes regarding the text, and cast biographies are included in a compact 24-page supplemental booklet. For all collections.-Barry X. Miller, Austin Public Library, TX Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up-In this beautiful and powerful novelization of Shakespeare's play, Lester has kept the plot intact but made some other changes crucial to his purpose. He shifts the setting from Venice to England and, most significantly, makes Othello, Iago, and Iago's wife all definitively black. They share a three-way friendship that originated in their native Africa. It is important that Iago is black and thereby released from any racist intent; the author is then able to maintain the focus of the tragedy on the weaknesses of the human soul and on problems of perception versus reality. But through the enhanced character development afforded by the novel form, Lester has also explored problems of racial alienation. His prose is an incredibly skillful blend of his own words and Shakespeare's, both paraphrased and quoted directly, interwoven seamlessly into a narrative that transmutes the musical feeling of Shakespeare's language into modern English. This is a book to be enjoyed on its own but is sure to send many readers back to the original with a heightened understanding of and appreciation for it. This wonderful achievement is a must for all libraries.-Margaret Cole, Oceanside Library, NY
Ilene Cooper

Some may wonder what Lester is up to here. A novelization of Shakespeare's "Othello"? Why not just read the play? But in his well-reasoned introduction, Lester tackles that subject head-on, and his answers should convince even purists that there's a place for this book. After all, it's common knowledge that Shakespeare took plots from other works, so Lester is only following the Bard's example. Moreover, Lester firmly states that his book is not a substitute for the play but, rather, a re-imagining of the story

Though he follows the original story line, Lester has made significant changes in the characterizations. Now Iago and Emilia (Emily in the play), like Othello, are black. Lester wanted race to be a more central theme of his novel, and by repositioning these characters, he brings a new and powerful dimension to that aspect of the story. In portraying Othello, Iago, and Emily as Africans who have come to England (the new setting) together, Lester gives them a mutual history that also adds psychological depth to his new conceptualization

Another goal of Lester's is to make his book a bridge to the play. Since Shakespeare's language can be an inhibiting factor for young people, this more modern rendering makes the story accessible. But Lester does not entirely remake Shakespeare's style. Sometimes Lester paraphrases; at other times, he uses exact wording, which is printed in boldface, a useful, if occasionally awkward device

There's only one problem with the book, and it's one that has played around the edges of Shakespeare's work as well. Othello's dramatic about-face concerning Desdemona, ending in her murder, comes with a quickness that will probably startle young readers. Despite the pyschological motivations Lester has tried to establish, Othello's haste to distrust does not seem to mesh with the image of the noble general that's been presented. Perhaps because of the intimacy a novel engenders, this jump seems more jarring here than it does in the play. On the whole, however, this is a fascinating effort. The story of "Othello", with its questions about perceptions, race, and the nature of love and friendship, will be a natural draw for young people, just as it has been for readers worldwide, for centuries.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780451516176
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 5/1/1962
  • Series: Shakespeare Series
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 5.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Terry Des Jardins, M.Ed, RRT is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Respiratory Care at Parkland College in Champaign, IL where he taught for 35 years. He still actively lectures third year medical students on clinical manifestations and assessment of respiratory disease and cardiopulmonary physiology at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at UrbanChampaign.

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Read an Excerpt


Cambridge University Press
0521618762 - Othello - Edited by Jane Coles
Excerpt



List of characters


OTHELLO A black army general in the service of the Duke of Venice
DESDEMONA Othello's wife, daughter of Brabantio
IAGO Othello's ensign (standard-bearer)
EMILIA Iago's wife, companion to Desdemona
CASSIO Othello's lieutenant
BIANCA in love with Cassio
DUKE OF
VENICE
BRABANTIO A Venetian senator, father of Desdemona
RODERIGO A Venetian gentleman, in love with Desdemona
GRATIANO Brabantio's brother
LODOVICO Brabantio's relative
MONTANO Governor of Cyprus
Senators of Venice
Gentlemen of Cyprus
CLOWN Servant to Othello
Herald
Messenger
Musicians, soldiers, attendants, servants
Sailor

The action of the play takes place in Venice and Cyprus.


Two men are in the middle of an argument. Roderigo accuses Iago of cheating him. Iago is angry about failing to gain the promotion that has gone instead to Michael Cassio.

1 A dramatic opening (in pairs)

In the theatres of Shakespeare's time there was no electric lighting and no stage curtain. The playwright had to signal the start of the play by means of a dramatic opening scene. Here, the noisy audience would be silenced by two men in the middle of a heated argument, with much swearing.

  1. Read this opening conversation (lines 1-34) aloud. Try reading it in several different ways to find which way sounds best. Discuss which words in the script gave you clues as to how it should be spoken.
  2. Film and theatre directors have chosen various ways in which to begin the play (see pp. 240-1 for a detailed activity exploring some of these). Think about ways in which you might want to set the scene, how you might have actors enter the stage, and what sound and lighting effects might suggest a street at night.
  3. The play opens half-way through an argument. Make up what you think Iago and Roderigo have been saying before the play begins. End your dialogue on the first line of the play.

2 Michael Cassio - why does Iago dislike him?

Iago explains why he believes he has not been promoted to the rank of lieutenant (lines 8-27). Look carefully at the way Iago describes Cassio (lines 19-26) and pick out four key phrases which suggest why Iago is jealous of him.


Othello, the Moor of Venice

Act 1 Scene 1
Venice A street at night


Enter RODERIGO and IAGO.
RODERIGO Tush, never tell me, I take it much unkindly
That thou, Iago, who hast had my purse
As if the strings were thine shouldst know of this.
IAGO 'Sblood, but you will not hear me.
If ever I did dream of such a matter,
5
Abhor me.
RODERIGO Thou told'st me thou didst hold him in thy hate.
IAGO Despise me if I do not: three great ones of the city,
In personal suit to make me his lieutenant,
Off-capped to him; and by the faith of man,
10
I know my price, I am worth no worse a place.
But he, as loving his own pride and purposes,
Evades them with a bombast circumstance,
Horribly stuffed with epithets of war,
And in conclusion,
15
Non-suits my mediators. For 'Certes', says he,
'I have already chosen my officer.'
And what was he?
Forsooth, a great arithmetician,
One Michael Cassio, a Florentine,
20
A fellow almost damned in a fair wife,
That never set a squadron in the field,
Nor the devision of a battle knows
More than a spinster, unless the bookish theoric,
Wherein the togèd consuls can propose
25
As masterly as he. Mere prattle without practice
Is all his soldiership. But he, sir, had the election,



Iago continues to complain about 'the Moor' and the system of promotion. He says he pretends to be a faithful officer, but follows Othello only to serve his own purposes.

1 First impressions of Iago (in small groups)

Read the page of script aloud several times, sharing out the lines.

On a large plain piece of paper, write IAGO in the centre (see the diagram below) and collect together any key things Iago seems to say about himself. Include anything that reveals something about his character or motivation. On the outer layer of the diagram explain in your own words what you believe each quotation might indicate about him.

Image not available in HTML version


When you have finished, join together with other groups and compare your sheet with theirs. Explain how and why you chose your particular words/phrases/lines.

Pool your ideas to produce one final diagram for display on your classroom wall.


And I, of whom his eyes had seen the proof
At Rhodes, at Cyprus, and on other grounds
Christian and heathen, must be lee'd and calmed
30
By debitor and creditor; this counter-caster,
He, in good time, must his lieutenant be,
And I, God bless the mark, his Moorship's ancient.
RODERIGO By heaven, I rather would have been his hangman.
IAGO Why, there's no remedy. 'Tis the curse of service;
35
Preferment goes by letter and affection,
Not by the old gradation, where each second
Stood heir to the first. Now sir, be judge yourself
Whether I in any just term am affined
To love the Moor.
RODERIGO I would not follow him then.
40
IAGO O sir, content you.
I follow him to serve my turn upon him.
We cannot all be masters, nor all masters
Cannot be truly followed. You shall mark
Many a duteous and knee-crooking knave,
45
That doting on his own obsequious bondage,
Wears out his time much like his master's ass
For nought but provender, and when he's old, cashiered.
Whip me such honest knaves. Others there are
Who, trimmed in forms and visages of duty,
50
Keep yet their hearts attending on themselves,
And throwing but shows of service on their lords,
Do well thrive by them; and when they have lined their coats,
Do themselves homage. These fellows have some soul,
And such a one do I profess myself.
55
For, sir,
It is as sure as you are Roderigo,
Were I the Moor, I would not be Iago;
In following him, I follow but myself.
Heaven is my judge, not I for love and duty,
60
But seeming so for my peculiar end.
For when my outward action doth demonstrate
The native act and figure of my heart
In complement extern, 'tis not long after
But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve
65
For daws to peck at. I am not what I am.



Iago suggests a way of taking revenge against Othello. They shout in the street outside Brabantio's house, and tell him the news that he has been 'robbed'.

1 'BRABANTIO [appears] above at a window ' (in pairs)

Turn to page 186, where you will find an illustration of an Elizabethan theatre. It has a deep 'thrust' stage, with two exits at the back and a balcony above. Some of the audience stood crammed in 'the pit' (the 'groundlings'), others sat in tiers of seating around the walls, and a few even sat on the stage.

Talk together about how you would stage lines 68-93:

  • on the Elizabethan stage
  • on a modern acting space.

Think about use of lighting, and any props which seem appropriate.

2 Iago's role (in groups of three)

Take parts and read lines 68-143 (to 'Light, I say, light!'). Notice the differences in the way the three characters speak. Do Iago and Roderigo take an equal share in giving information to Brabantio? Now look more closely at the way Iago speaks:

  1. Identify each occasion on which Iago uses the imperative form of a verb (lines 68-74).
  2. Find any times Iago uses animal imagery between lines 68 and 92. What kind of animals are they and what are they doing? (This activity is continued on p. 8.)
  3. On the previous page Iago has talked a good deal about himself - count how many times he uses the first-person pronoun in approximately ten lines of script (see lines 57-66).

Discuss what Shakespeare's use of language suggests about Iago and his relationship with the other men at this point in the play.


RODERIGO What a full fortune does the thick-lips owe,
If he can carry it thus!
IAGO Call up her father:
Rouse him, make after him, poison his delight,
Proclaim him in the street, incense her kinsmen,
70
And though he in a fertile climate dwell,
Plague him with flies: though that his joy be joy,
Yet throw such chances of vexation on't
As it may lose some colour.
RODERIGO Here is her father's house; I'll call aloud.
75
IAGO Do, with like timorous accent and dire yell,
As when, by night and negligence, the fire
Is spied in populous cities.
RODERIGO What ho, Brabantio! Signior Brabantio, ho!
IAGO Awake! What ho, Brabantio! Thieves, thieves!
80
Look to your house, your daughter, and your bags!
Thieves, thieves!
BRABANTIO [appears] above at a window.
BRABANTIO What is the reason of this terrible summons?
What is the matter there?
RODERIGO Signior, is all your family within?
85
IAGO Are your doors locked?
BRABANTIO Why, wherefore ask you this?
IAGO Zounds, sir, you're robbed; for shame, put on your gown;
Your heart is burst; you have lost half your soul;
Even now, now, very now, an old black ram
Is tupping your white ewe. Arise, arise;
90
Awake the snorting citizens with the bell,
Or else the devil will make a grandsire of you.
Arise, I say!



Brabantio suspects the two men are drunk. He learns Roderigo's name, but not Iago's. Iago obscenely tells him that Desdemona and Othello are having sexual intercourse and that his descendants will be mere animals.

1 Animals

Read through the script on pages 7 and 9. Identify any references to animals or insects in the dialogue. It may help you to know that a 'Barbary horse' is a North African breed, 'coursers' are racehorses, and 'jennets' are a breed of small Spanish horse.

Write down which characters make the comments, and what significance the choice of each animal image carries for you. Discuss what effect this choice of language might be intended to have. You will find further examples of this type of imagery on page 229.

2 Verse and prose

Brabantio and Roderigo speak in verse. When Iago interjects (at line 109), the script switches to prose. Read 'Verse and prose' on page 228, then suggest why Shakespeare gives Iago prose here.

3 A different perspective (in pairs)

Imagine you are two servants in Brabantio's house, intrigued by the commotion outside. What can you make of the rag-bag of information shouted by the two men in the street? Improvise a 'below-stairs' scene between the two servants.


BRABANTIO What, have you lost your wits?
RODERIGO Most reverend signior, do you know my voice?
BRABANTIO Not I; what are you?
95
RODERIGO My name is Roderigo.
BRABANTIO The worser welcome;
I have charged thee not to haunt about my doors;
In honest plainness thou hast heard me say
My daughter is not for thee. And now in madness,
Being full of supper and distempering draughts,
100
Upon malicious bravery dost thou come
To start my quiet.
RODERIGO Sir, sir, sir -
BRABANTIO But thou must needs be sure
My spirit and my place have in them power
To make this bitter to thee.
RODERIGO Patience, good sir.
105
BRABANTIO What tell'st thou me of robbing? This is Venice;
My house is not a grange.
RODERIGO Most grave Brabantio,
In simple and pure soul I come to you.
IAGO Zounds, sir; you are one of those that will not serve God if the devil bid you. Because we come to do you service and you think we are ruffians, you'll have your daughter covered with a Barbary horse, you'll have your nephews neigh to you, you'll have coursers for cousins, and jennets for germans.
110
BRABANTIO What profane wretch art thou?
IAGO I am one, sir, that comes to tell you your daughter and the Moor are now making the beast with two backs.
115
BRABANTIO Thou art a villain.
IAGO You are a senator.



Roderigo tells Brabantio that Desdemona has run away to live with Othello. Brabantio leaves to check if the story is true, saying he has already dreamt of such a happening.

1 Desdemona's flight (in groups of three)

Read Roderigo's report of Desdemona's secret departure from home (lines 119-36).

Mime her flight, using captions taken from Roderigo's story. Share your version with the rest of the class.

2 '. . . a gross revolt' (in small groups)

Desdemona has run away from home to marry a man of whom her father disapproves. There are several of Shakespeare's plays in which young people rebel against their parents' wishes (most famously Romeo and Juliet). Generally speaking, in Shakespeare's comedies the young people are eventually forgiven; in tragedies the situation ends with disaster for them.

Talk together about other stories you have read or films you have seen which include a similar plot element. How is the family split resolved in those stories?

3 Word association (in pairs)

In lines 119-39 Roderigo refers to Desdemona in positive terms (e.g. 'fair'), whereas he uses derogatory language to refer to Othello (e.g. 'gross clasps'). Identify all words/phrases he uses to talk about Othello and Desdemona. Discuss with your partner why you think he makes this distinction.



© Cambridge University Press
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Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Preface
A Note on the Text
The Text of Othello
The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice 2
Textual Commentary 119
Textual Notes 123
Sources and Contexts
Othello in Its Own Time 129
The Moor of Venice 151
Criticism
Othello in Critical History 165
"A Bloody Farce" 201
Comments on Rymer's Othello 210
Shakespeare, the Rules, and Othello 216
Othello's Color: Theatrical versus Literary Representation 221
Iago, Heroic Tragedy, and Othello 222
Comments on Othello 230
"The Most Painfully Exciting and the Most Terrible" of Shakespeare's Tragedies 235
"The Last Great Speech of Othello" 244
Othello: An Essay to Illustrate a Method 244
Othello and Colour Prejudice 248
Othello's Handkerchief: "The Recognizance and Pledge of Love" 262
Othello's Occupation: Shakespeare and the Romance of Chivalry 275
"Nay, That's Not Next": Othello, [5.2] in Performance, 1760-1900 289
Unproper Beds: Race, Adultery, and the Hideous in Othello 306
Othello and Hamlet: Dilation, Spying and the "Secret Place" of Woman 329
Charivari and the Comedy of Abjection in Othello 350
"Too Much Violence": Murdering Wives in Othello 366
Selected Bibliography 389
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 115 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 116 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 12, 2012

    Something wrong....

    There seems to be something wrong with Act IV in this version and it will not open on my Nook or on my PC... Either way I would go with a different version.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2012

    Students only

    It works. Its a book. But there were so many typos and random numbers everywhere, it was annoying to read. But for desperate students, its cheaper than buying the book.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2014

    Not othello

    This sucks

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2013

    Not english

    Not english version

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2014

    Moonflower

    Whoa what just happend?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2014

    Legend

    "Would i mentor?"

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2014

    {:DC:}

    Your symbols.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2014

    Shimmerstar

    I swear l posted the ceremony! Ot didn't post. Darn! I'll do it tomorrow.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2014

    Tigerkit

    Let out a squeak

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    Leafdrop

    Is here

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2014

    Shimmerstar

    "I belive you will be a loyal, brave, deputy."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2014

    FlameStar to StonePaw

    (No. I'm just saying I might.)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2014

    To Ferns

    Actually the Pact Clans are just following the warrior code when they let abandoned kits join.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2014

    𔫘

    Hdh

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2014

    &star Feather &star

    "Married is he? To another fake werewolf? Ha! Fake werewof pups there gonna have right?" She aneered and launched herself at darkness.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2014

    Darkness

    No his married in the black market.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2014

    Grim

    Without a moment of pause, she replied with a annoyed tone. "You must think I am foolish. First off, why am I even talking to you? You not a deputy nor a leader. Second off, I'm not going to just rattle off all my plans to you when the whole world is watching, we have never met, the whole idea is riding on a maybe, and you not a deputy or a leader. Good bye. Ferns, Poisenclaw, come back home with me please." She said with a nod and walked out.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2014

    Poisonclaw

    He flicked his tail, some anger spiking his pelt.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2014

    Sparkkit

    Layed down

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2014

    Hazelfur

    Psst you here? Sparkkit?

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