Othello (Pelican Shakespeare Series) [NOOK Book]

Overview

In this tragedy by William Shakespeare, the heroic Moor of Venice is driven to suspicion and finally murderous rage against his true love Desdemona by the cunning and hateful Iago.



This edition features an overview of Shakespeare's works by Sylvan Barnet, former Chairman of the English Department at ...
See more details below
Othello (Pelican Shakespeare Series)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$4.99
BN.com price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

In this tragedy by William Shakespeare, the heroic Moor of Venice is driven to suspicion and finally murderous rage against his true love Desdemona by the cunning and hateful Iago.



This edition features an overview of Shakespeare's works by Sylvan Barnet, former Chairman of the English Department at Tufts University, as well as a comprehensive stage and screen history, dramatic criticism from the past and present, and sources from which Shakespeare derived this great work.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781440628436
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 5/1/2001
  • Series: Shakespeare, Signet Classic
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 180,891
  • File size: 310 KB

Meet the Author


WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE was born at Stratford upon Avon in April, 1564. He was the third child, and eldest son, of John Shakespeare and Mary Arden. His father was one of the most prosperous men of Stratford, who held in turn the chief offices in the town. His mother was of gentle birth, the daughter of Robert Arden of Wilmcote. In December, 1582, Shakespeare married Ann Hathaway, daughter of a farmer of Shottery, near Stratford; their first child Susanna was baptized on May 6, 1583, and twins, Hamnet and Judith, on February 22, 1585. Little is known of Shakespeare’s early life; but it is unlikely that a writer who dramatized such an incomparable range and variety of human kinds and experiences should have spent his early manhood entirely in placid pursuits in a country town. There is one tradition, not universally accepted, that he fled from Stratford because he was in trouble for deer stealing, and had fallen foul of Sir Thomas Lucy, the local magnate; another that he was for some time a schoolmaster.

From 1592 onwards the records are much fuller. In March, 1592, the Lord Strange’s players produced a new play at the Rose Theatre called Harry the Sixth, which was very successful, and was probably the First Part of Henry VI. In the autumn of 1592 Robert Greene, the best known of the professional writers, as he was dying wrote a letter to three fellow writers in which he warned them against the ingratitude of players in general, and in particular against an ‘upstart crow’ who ‘supposes he is as much able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you: and being an absolute Johannes Factotum is in his own conceit the only Shake-scene in a country.’ This is the first reference to Shakespeare, and the whole passage suggests that Shakespeare had become suddenly famous as a playwright. At this time Shakespeare was brought into touch with Edward Alleyne the great tragedian, and Christopher Marlowe, whose thundering parts of Tamburlaine, the Jew of Malta, and Dr Faustus Alleyne was acting, as well as Hieronimo, the hero of Kyd’s Spanish Tragedy, the most famous of all Elizabethan plays.

In April, 1593, Shakespeare published his poem Venus and Adonis, which was dedicated to the young Earl of Southampton: it was a great and lasting success, and was reprinted nine times in the next few years. In May, 1594, his second poem, The Rape of Lucrece, was also dedicated to Southampton.

There was little playing in 1593, for the theatres were shut during a severe outbreak of the plague; but in the autumn of 1594, when the plague ceased, the playing companies were reorganized, and Shakespeare became a sharer in the Lord Chamberlain’s company who went to play in the Theatre in Shoreditch. During these months Marlowe and Kyd had died. Shakespeare was thus for a time without a rival. He had already written the three parts of Henry VI, Richard III, Titus Andronicus, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Love’s Labour’s Lost, The Comedy of Errors, and The Taming of the Shrew. Soon afterwards he wrote the first of his greater plays – Romeo and Juliet – and he followed this success in the next three years with A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Richard II, and The Merchant of Venice. The two parts of Henry VI, introducing Falstaff, the most popular of all his comic characters, were written in 1597–8.

The company left the Theatre in 1597 owing to disputes over a renewal of the ground lease, and went to play at the Curtain in the same neighbourhood. The disputes continued throughout 1598, and at Christmas the players settled the matter by demolishing the old Theatre and re-erecting a new playhouse on the South bank of the Thames, near Southwark Cathedral. This playhouse was named the Globe. The expenses of the new building were shared by the chief members of the Company, including Shakespeare, who was now a man of some means. In 1596 he had bought New Place, a large house in the centre of Stratford, for £60, and through his father purchased a coat-of-arms from the Heralds, which was the official recognition that he and his family were gentlefolk.

By the summer of 1598 Shakespeare was recognized as the greatest of English dramatists. Booksellers were printing his more popular plays, at times even in pirated or stolen versions, and he received a remarkable tribute from a young writer named Francis Meres, in his book Palladis Tamia. In a long catalogue of English authors Meres gave Shakespeare more prominence than any other writer, and mentioned by name twelve of his plays.

Shortly before the Globe was opened, Shakespeare had completed the cycle of plays dealing with the whole story of the Wars of the Roses with Henry V. It was followed by As You Like it, and Julius Caesar, the first of the maturer tragedies. In the next three years he wrote Troilus and Cressida, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Hamlet, and Twelfth Night.

On March 24, 1603, Queen Elizabeth died. The company had often performed before her, but they found her successor a far more enthusiastic patron. One of the first acts of King James was to take over the company and to promote them to be his own servants, so that henceforward they were known as the King’s Men. They acted now very frequently at Court, and prospered accordingly. In the early years of the reign Shakespeare wrote the more sombre comedies, All’s Well that Ends Well, and Measure for Measure, which were followed by Othello, Macbeth, and King Lear. Then he returned to Roman themes with Antony and Cleopatra and Coriolanus.

Since 1601 Shakespeare had been writing less, and there were now a number of rival dramatists who were introducing new styles of drama, particularly Ben Jonson (whose first successful comedy, Every Man in his Humour, was acted by Shakespeare’s company in 1598), Chapman, Dekker, Marston, and Beaumont and Fletcher who began to write in 1607. In 1608 the King’s Men acquired a second playhouse, an indoor private theatre in the fashionable quarter of the Blackfriars. At private theatres, plays were performed indoors; the prices charged were higher than in the public playhouses, and the audience consequently was more select. Shakespeare seems to have retired from the stage about this time: his name does not occur in the various lists of players after 1607. Henceforward he lived for the most part at Stratford, where he was regarded as one of the most important citizens. He still wrote a few plays, and he tried his hand at the new form of tragi-comedy – a play with tragic incidents but a happy ending – which Beaumont and Fletcher had popularized. He wrote four of these – Pericles, Cymbeline, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest, which was acted at Court in 1611. For the last four years of his life he lived in retirement. His son Hamnet had died in 1596: his two daughters were now married. Shakespeare died at Stratford upon Avon on April 23, 1616, and was buried in the chancel of the church, before the high altar. Shortly afterwards a memorial which still exists, with a portrait bust, was set up on the North wall. His wife survived him.

When Shakespeare died fourteen of his plays had been separately published in Quarto booklets. In 1623 his surviving fellow actors, John Heming and Henry Condell, with the co-operation of a number of printers, published a collected edition of thirty-six plays in one Folio volume, with an engraved portrait, memorial verses by Ben Jonson and others, and an Epistle to the Reader in which Heming a

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 390 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(276)

4 Star

(39)

3 Star

(23)

2 Star

(25)

1 Star

(27)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 390 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 28, 2009

    An excellent edition of Othello

    This review is not of Othello itself (which is tremendously good), but rather on this edition of Othello (ISBN: 9781411400399), which was edited by Daniel Vitkus and David Scott Kastan.

    I read a lot of heavily annotated books, and I have to say that the Barnes & Noble Shakespeare editions have one of the best book designs I've ever encountered. The various references materials (footnotes and definitions for archaic words) appear in a manner that makes the text very easy to follow.

    The scholarship is also top-notch. The annotations give you enough to make things clear without insulting your intelligence, or without overburdening you with unnecessary detail. The essays are also interesting and informative.

    I've been avoiding Shakespeare ever since high school, which was many years ago. Now that I'm reading him again, I'm glad I'm in such good hands. It is making the experience a joy, rather than a chore.

    My compliments to the editors and the book designer. They have done a superior job of making this difficult text accessible to the modern reader. Highly recommended.

    12 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2013

    ???

    Why give samples of books if the sample is only the introduction or publishers notes? It gives no sample of the actual story itself, so you have no way of knowing how the story is written to see if you understand it. Very annoying.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 9, 2010

    Outstanding edition of a Shakespeare classic

    The story of Othello is one of Shakespeare's best: Iago is the ultimate antagonist you love to hate. On the one hand, it is fascinating to watch him plot, scheme and set his traps. On the other, you are appalled at how quickly Othello turns on his new wife, just on the word of Iago. Shakespeare is the master! The Folger edition is also a classic. These are the editions I bought as a student, and now that I'm teaching Shakespeare, I was delighted that this was the edition my students requested. The edition combines the Folio version and the Quarto version, indicating those words unique to one version. My (middle school) students enjoy the plot summaries at the beginning of each scene and the definitions of unfamiliar words on the left hand page. Definitely a book to keep in your library.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2011

    Take a look

    This is a good book for those who are somewhat familiar with the works of Shakespeare as it provided translation to some of the text (but not all). The beginning gives good insight into Shakespeare.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2008

    Shakespeare's Othello

    I absolutely loved Othello. The love between Othello and Desdemona was beyond comprehension. Shakespeare uses beautiful metaphores and use of language that makes us believe the beauty of love, power of hatred and most of all, jealousy. My all time favorite villain is Iago. Shakespeare gives this particular character its own world. The multiple personality of Iago is very frightening that leads to a great tragedy of this play. Throughout the play, Iago builds his way up to the top and explodes leaving his good side behind. A true Shakespeare classic that will never leave your heart.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 5, 2011

    YES!!!!

    This play was absolutely amazing. It definitely teaches you the result of jealousy without "ocular proof". A great read. I zoomed by it so fast... finished it in two days. Amazing amazing amazing. This addition is absolutely perfect for Shakespeare beginners. :)))
    Whoever said his plays were a bore?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 26, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    My favorite tragedy

    Yes, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, and Macbeth are indeed more famous plays, but Othello deserves more recognition! It's a delightfully convoluted plot, and the characters are so believable. Plus, the dialogue is beautiful, and it deals with a problem relevant to today's society:racism. So, yeah, read this play.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2014

    FORCEMATE

    Clover, a brown tabby with green eyes, is unsuspecting at 'hao' res 1.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    Clawwhisker

    He fake smiles. (He hates smileing)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    Clawwhisker

    He lays down. "Ehy doesn't anyone like me?"

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    Leafstar

    "Thank you." She smiled. [Leafstar... xD]

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    Leafstar - Leader of Darkclan

    The Shecat pads in. "Excuse me, but my Clan, Forestclan, would like to become Darkclan's Allie. Please consider my request. Thank you." She padded back to her Clan at 'light tree' result two. [I cant spell Ally. Or is it Allie? Or Alli? Bleh.]

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    MousePrint

    He dips his head. "Thank you."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    INFO

    Cats who eat water hemlock cant chew. Chew it for her and force it into her mouth

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    &#9786 guess whos back.!!!!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2014

    Leaffall

    NEVER GONNA GIVE YOU UP!
    NEVER GONNA BRING YOU DOWN!
    NEVER GONNA RUN AROUND AND DESERT YOU!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2014

    Mistyfeather

    Oh.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2014

    Shimmerstar2

    "Hello, love." She puured.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2014

    Thunderstrike

    She dipped her head. "And I will strive to be that deputy," she declared.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2014

    StarClan to Mistyfeather

    &star You will have no companions...you must use your strengths and figure out on your own. &star

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 390 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)