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The Other Goose
     

The Other Goose

5.0 1
by Judith Kerr
 

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There once was a goose called Katerina. Everybody liked her. But she was sad because she was the only goose on her pond.

Sometimes Katerina thought she could see another goose in the side of a shiny car. She'd stare and stare at the other goose and think, "One day that goose will come out. Then I'll no longer be the only goose on the pond."

And suddenly one day ..

Overview

There once was a goose called Katerina. Everybody liked her. But she was sad because she was the only goose on her pond.

Sometimes Katerina thought she could see another goose in the side of a shiny car. She'd stare and stare at the other goose and think, "One day that goose will come out. Then I'll no longer be the only goose on the pond."

And suddenly one day ... it did!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
At first glance, Kerr's (When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit) heroine seems to be just another earnestly dimwitted and excitable goose. But with calm, unadorned prose, smooth pacing and the genial realism of her modest colored-pencil drawings, Kerr makes Katerina more than the butt of a joke. Yearning for a companion to share life in the town's pond, Katerina believes that the reflection she sees in a shiny car is actually the other goose of the title: One day that goose will come out, thinks Katerina. Then I'll no longer be the only goose on the pond. But a snowfall that comes between Katerina and the reflection makes her think that her beloved has escaped! The sight of a man carrying a goose-sized thing in [a] goose-sized bag convinces Katerina that her soulmate is the victim of a goose-napping, and she single-mindedly pursues the perceived culprit. In the end, not only does justice prevail Katerina foils a bank robber but true love does, too: as a reward for her bravery, the town acquires a dashing gander named Charlie. The story gains from the English village setting (the mayor appears in a ceremonial robe) and from the supporting role awarded a girl shown admiring her own reflection on the car's surface, she is the only one who understands what Katerina really wants. This confidently unhurried story should evoke sighs of contentment from the audience. Ages 4-8. (June) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Lonely Katerina, the only goose on the village pond, sees what she thinks is another goose in the reflection on the side of a car. She longs for it to come out and join her. When it snows and the goose is gone from the car, Katerina thinks it has emerged, and goes searching for it. She attacks a burglar when she thinks he has the goose in a bag, and thus saves the bank's money. As a reward, a companion named Charlie arrives, soon followed by a host of babies, and she is content. Although the story is a bit prosaic, the naturalistic colored drawings produce a visual narrative with contextual details and engaging characters with decided charm. Katerina, a goose with personality, dominates the pages. The several pages of her attack on the burglar show an exciting sequence of action, while her romance with Charlie moves more gently. 2002 (orig. 2001), HarperCollins Publishers,
— Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-Katerina is the only goose on the pond. Though she is well liked by all the townspeople, she is lonely and wishes for a companion. When she sees her reflection in the side of Mr. Buswell's shiny car she thinks, "One day that goose will come out. Then I'll no longer be the only goose on the pond." Winter arrives and Katerina can no longer see her reflection on the snow-covered car. She believes the other goose has emerged at last and sets off to find it. Mistaking a bag of stolen money for a bag of goose, she chases a robber into the town square. All ends well as the thief is caught and Katerina is rewarded-with another goose for the town pond. The story is illustrated with colored pencil in a limited pastel palette. Bland, generic cartoon figures are barely distinguishable from one another. In fact, the robber and Katerina's friend Bert are so alike in appearance and clothing that some readers might think they are the same person. There are also a few awkward transitions in the narrative. Although readers will find the conclusion satisfying, this contrived story is not a first choice.-Heather E. Miller, Homewood Public Library, AL Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Kerr, author of the beloved Mog books, uses soft, colored pencils and a Mother Goose-meets-The Ugly Duckling story to weave an uneven tale about a lonely goose in search of a mate. As the only goose on the town pond, Katerina wants the other goose-the one she sees reflected in the shiny side of a car-to "come out of the car" and be her friend. When Katerina stops a robbery at the bank, the townspeople reward her; the next day, the shiny car pulls up, the door opens, and Charlie, Katerina's male counterpart, "comes out of the car." The narrative stands on the interplay between text and picture; Kerr's scrawling colored-pencil illustrations complement her text nicely, adding humor where it is lacking. The choice of colored pencils as a medium creates the look of a child's drawings, simple and straightforward. Kerr's dialogue is patchy, at times unoriginal, and yet sometimes wonderfully clever. When Katerina sees the robber carrying a bag, she thinks, "it was a goose-sized bag and there was something in it. There was a goose-sized thing in that goose-sized bag." The logic here follows nicely, as Katerina pieces together the scene and comes to the realization that something is wrong. Yet many of Katerina's actions seem forced, as if placed strategically to arrive at the final "wink" in the story-the "coming out of the car" play on words. While young and old audiences alike will get a kick out of this joke, the wordplay alone does not hold up as the backbone of the work. New readers will be able to "read" the pictures, without ever knowing a word. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780007127351
Publisher:
HarperCollins UK
Publication date:
10/28/2005
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.11(d)
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Judith Kerr was born in Berlin, the daughter of a distinguished German writer. She left Nazi Germany with her family in 1933 and fled across Europe, eventually settling in England. Years later she wrote about her experiences in her best-selling novel for middle-grade readers When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit. She is also the author and illustrator of numerous picture books, including TheTiger Who Came to Tea, which was first published in 1968 and has since sold more than one million copies worldwide. She lives in England.

Judith Kerr was born in Berlin, the daughter of a distinguished German writer. She left Nazi Germany with her family in 1933 and fled across Europe, eventually settling in England. Years later she wrote about her experiences in her best-selling novel for middle-grade readers When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit. She is also the author and illustrator of numerous picture books, including TheTiger Who Came to Tea, which was first published in 1968 and has since sold more than one million copies worldwide. She lives in England.

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Other Goose 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great book about a lonely goose and how she finds a friend. It is exceptionally well written and is my 3 year old's favorite book. Fortunately, it is one that I don't mind reading over and over and over...