Other People's Problems

Other People's Problems

by Breton
     
 

Breton's debut album, Other People's Problems, often feels like the next step in dubstep's journey to ubiquity. Where artists like SBTRKT and James Blake developed a more personal, song and vocals-oriented side to the sound, groups like Nedry and Breton go a step further, incorporating…  See more details below

Overview

Breton's debut album, Other People's Problems, often feels like the next step in dubstep's journey to ubiquity. Where artists like SBTRKT and James Blake developed a more personal, song and vocals-oriented side to the sound, groups like Nedry and Breton go a step further, incorporating a rock band feel into dubstep's moody template. Of course, by the time of Other People's Problems' release, you-got-your-rock-in-my-electronic-music/you-got-your-electronic-music-in-my-rock hybrids weren't exactly new, and Breton recall a more streamlined Klaxons, Metronomy, or onetime tourmate Tom Vek as often as they do James Blake; frontman Roman Rappak's half-singing, half-talking vocals are decidedly indie-sounding no matter how sleek their surroundings get. "The Commission" and "Edward the Confessor" sound suitably dark and moody, and "Ghost Note"'s dense vocals and wavering synth lines are commanding. However, Breton sound more natural when they let their rock side dominate, as on the brassy and vividly melodic single "Interference" or "Jostle," where live drums and several breakdowns and buildups show they're more agile than expected. When a glitchy, deconstructed piano morphs into full-out rock on "Wood and Plastic," it's another surprise that shows Breton have potential to burn.

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Product Details

Release Date:
04/03/2012
Label:
Fat Cat
UPC:
0600116510426
catalogNumber:
65104
Rank:
323074

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