Other Selves: Animals in the Canadian Literary Imagination

Overview

Other Selves: Animals in the Canadian Literary Imagination begins with the premise, first suggested by Margaret Atwood in The Animals in That Country (1968), that animals have occupied a peculiarly central position in the Canadian imagination. Unlike the longer-settled countries of Europe or the more densely-populated United States, in Canada animals have always been the loved and feared co-inhabitants of this harsh, beautiful land. From the realistic animal tales of Charles G. D. Roberts and Ernest Thompson ...

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Other Selves: Animals in the Canadian Literary Imagination

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Overview

Other Selves: Animals in the Canadian Literary Imagination begins with the premise, first suggested by Margaret Atwood in The Animals in That Country (1968), that animals have occupied a peculiarly central position in the Canadian imagination. Unlike the longer-settled countries of Europe or the more densely-populated United States, in Canada animals have always been the loved and feared co-inhabitants of this harsh, beautiful land. From the realistic animal tales of Charles G. D. Roberts and Ernest Thompson Seton, to the urban animals of Marshall Saunders and Dennis Lee, to the lyrical observations of bird enthusiasts John James Audubon, Thomas McIlwraith, and Don McKay, animals have occupied a key place in Canadian literature, focusing central aspects of our environmental consciousness and cultural symbolism. Other Selves explores how and what the animals in this country have meant through all genres and periods of Canadian writing, focusing sometimes on individual texts and at other times on broader issues. Tackling more than a century of writing, from 19th-century narrative of women travellers, to the "natural" conversion of Grey Owl, to the award-winning novels of Farley Mowat, Marian Engel, Timothy Findley, Barbara Gowdy, and Yann Martel, these essays engage the reader in this widely-acknowledged but inadequately-explored aspect of Canadian literature.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780776606453
  • Publisher: University of Ottawa Press
  • Publication date: 7/12/2007
  • Series: Reappraisals: Canadian Writers Series
  • Pages: 366
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Janice Fiamengo is an associate professor of English at the University of Ottawa. She specializes in Canadian literature and has published widely on early Canadian writers.

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Table of Contents

Contributors     vii
"The Animals in This Country": Animals in the Canadian Literary Imagination   Janice Fiamengo     1
Reading Strategies for Animal Writing
(B)othering the Theory: Approaching the Unapproachable in Bear and Other Realistic Animal Narratives   Gwendolyn Guth     29
"Ontological Applause": Metaphor and Homology in the Poetry of Don McKay   Susan Fisher     50
"Drawn from Nature": Katherine Govier's Audubon and the Trauma of Extinction   Cynthia Sugars     67
Lick Me, Bite Me, Hear Me, Write Me: Tracking Animals between Postcolonialism and Ecocriticism   Travis V. Mason     100
Yann Martel's Life of Pi: Back in the World, Or "The Story with Animals is the Better Story"   Jack Robinson     125
Animal Writers
"So That Nothing May Be Lost": Thomas McIlwraith's Birds of Ontario   Christoph Irmscher     145
Marshall Saunders and the Urbanization of the Animal   Gwendolyn Davies     170
Charles G.D. Roberts's Cosmic Animals: Aspects of "Mythticism" in Earth's Enigmas   Thomas Hodd     184
St. Archie of the Wild: Grey Owl's Account of His "Natural" Conversion   Albert Braz     206
"At War With Nature": Animals in Timothy Findley's The Wars   Peter Webb     227
Fear, Friendship, andDelight: The Appeal of Animals in the Children's Poetry of Dennis Lee   Greg Maillet     245
The Politics of Animal Representation
When Elephants Weep: Reading The White Bone as a Sentimental Animal Story   Ella Soper-Jones     269
"The Mania for Killing": Hunting and Collecting in Seton's The Arctic Prairies   Misao Dean     290
The Politics of Hunting in Canadian Women's Narratives of Travel   Wendy Roy     305
National Species: Ecology, Allegory, and Indigeneity in the Wolf Stories of Roberts, Seton, and Mowat   Brian Johnson     333
Index     353
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