Otherwere: Stories of Transformation

Otherwere: Stories of Transformation

by Laura Anne Gilman
     
 

These masterful tales do not involve werewolves, butr a wonderfully diverse assortment of creatures including a serpent, a child, an elephant--even a right-wing Republican. Blending elements of fantasy, mystery, comedy and mythology, these extraordinary tales take lycanthropy into an entirely new realm.  See more details below

Overview

These masterful tales do not involve werewolves, butr a wonderfully diverse assortment of creatures including a serpent, a child, an elephant--even a right-wing Republican. Blending elements of fantasy, mystery, comedy and mythology, these extraordinary tales take lycanthropy into an entirely new realm.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Karen Herc
Lycanthropy is defined as the ability to become a werewolf. The editors of this anthology expanded the definition to include a were-elephant, were-snake, were-horse, were-deer, and more. Each of the fifteen authors in the collection features some sort of transformation as the centerpiece of his or her story. Three of the most imaginative and compelling stories are written by Nina Kiriki Hoffman, R. A. Salvatore, and Adam-Troy Castro. Hoffman's Inner Child is about a minister who turns into a not-entirely-convincing young boy; a girl in his neighborhood recognizes him for who he truly is after he saves her and her friend from being molested by older boys. Salvatore's The Coach with Big Teeth tells the story of a struggling Little Leaguer who sees his fanatical coach, his teammates, and the fans turn into attacking werewolves after he misses a catch in a big game. Castro's story The Way Things Ought to Be shows how a liberal teacher who accompanies women into an abortion clinic transforms into a right wing ultra-conservative after he's attacked and bitten by protesters outside the clinic. Several other stories are also very strong. Thylacine Dream by Julia Ecklar is told by a wry college student working on an expedition in Tasmania who sees the elusive thylacine, or Tasmanian wolf, and discovers what it becomes to avoid being photographed. Esther M. Freisner's The Strange Case of Ludwig the Unspeakable allows Sherlock Holmes to satisfy his curiosity about lycanthropy by transforming himself into the animal most suited to him. Finally, Debra Doyle and James D. MacDonald have concocted a creepy mystery that would make a fine plot for an episode of The X-Files in Ecdysis, a story about a huge snake that swallows women and uses their skins to provide himself with a human form on full-moon nights. The rest of the stories in the book, while not as memorable as these, are still entertaining, and they all contain unique and clever transformations. Fans who already know the work of these authors will enjoy this collection and newcomers will probably want to seek out their other writings. This anthology would make a solid addition to a YA fantasy collection. VOYA Codes: 4Q 3P J S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses, Will appeal with pushing, Junior High-defined as grades 7 to 9 and Senior High-defined as grades 10 to 12).

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780441003631
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
08/01/1996
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 5.00(h) x 1.00(d)

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